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Special Issue "Mental Health and Well-Being among LGBTIQ+ People"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Mental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2022)

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Henrique Pereira
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Psychology and Education, Faculty of Social and Human Sciences, University of Beira Interior, Pólo IV, 6200-209 Covilhã, Portugal
Interests: clinical and health psychology; psychotherapeutic processes; human sexuality; LGBTIQ+; sexual stigma; gender studies; psychopathology; mental illness; psychosocial impacts of HIV
Dr. Pedro Costa
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
William James Center for Research, ISPA—Instituto Universitário, 1149-041 Lisbon, Portugal
Interests: LGBT+ families; parenting aspirations; LGBT+ health; lifecourse development; minority stress; sexual stigma; LGBT+ aging
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A large body of epidemiological research has identified factors that put members of sexual minorities at risk for mental health problems, including depression, anxiety, and suicidal behavior. Research usually associates interpersonal discrimination with poor mental health outcomes among lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, intersex, queer people and other (LGBTIQ+), but further investigations of the influence of social contexts or norms on mental health and well-being disparities among sexual minorities are needed. This is an essential task, with relevant implications for health and social interventions and policy measures aimed at prevention. Focusing on enhancing the effectiveness of primary care and related services, while investing in prevention programs, resources, and research, this special issue will contribute to diminishing mental health disparities among LGBTIQ+ people and allow further social inclusion of sexual minority individuals. Sexual orientation and gender identity need to become a part of routine data collection so that inequalities in mental health and well-being can be more fully understood and addressed. For this Special Issue, we welcome original research, reviews and commentaries that provide new knowledge about determinants of mental health and well-being among LGBTIQ+ people from around the world.

Prof. Dr. Henrique Pereira
Dr. Pedro Costa
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • LGBTIQ+ people
  • mental health
  • well-being
  • sexual stigma
  • health behavior
  • risk factors
  • protective factors

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Experience of Sexual Orientation Microaggression among Young Adult Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Individuals in Taiwan: Its Related Factors and Association with Mental Health Problems
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(22), 11744; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182211744 - 09 Nov 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1165
Abstract
Experiences of sexual orientation microaggression (SOM) are prevalent in lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) individuals. The aims of this quantitative cross-sectional survey study were to examine the factors, including demographics, sexual orientation characteristics, and perceived social support related to SOM, as well as [...] Read more.
Experiences of sexual orientation microaggression (SOM) are prevalent in lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) individuals. The aims of this quantitative cross-sectional survey study were to examine the factors, including demographics, sexual orientation characteristics, and perceived social support related to SOM, as well as the relationships of SOM with anxiety, depression, and suicidality among young adult LGB individuals in Taiwan. In total, 1000 self-identified young adult LGB individuals (500 men and 500 women) participated in this study. The experience of SOM was assessed using the Sexual Orientation Microaggression Inventory. We also collected demographic and sexual orientation characteristics; perceived general family support, using the Family APGAR Index; anxiety on the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory; depression on the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale; and suicidality on the suicidality module of the Kiddie-SADS. The factors related to SOM and the associations of SOM with anxiety, depression, and suicidality were examined using multivariate linear regression analysis. The results indicated that males experienced greater SOM than females, and that younger age of identification of sexual orientation and perceived lower general family support were significantly associated with greater SOM. Greater SOM was significantly associated with greater anxiety, depression, and suicidality. The experiences of SOM in LGB individuals with mental health problems warrant assessment and intervention that take the related factors into account. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Health and Well-Being among LGBTIQ+ People)
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