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Special Issue "eHealth Literacy"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Digital Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Mariusz Duplaga
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Public Health, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Grzegorzecka Str. 20, 31-531 Krakow, Poland
Interests: public health; health promotion; health programmes; health literacy; e health; digital health literacy; telemedicine
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

eHealth is perceived as a great opportunity for increasing the effectiveness of interventions in public health and health promotion. Unfortunately, the communities interested in the development of eHealth and those active in public health do not benefit sufficiently from the synergies between these two fields. The concept of eHealth literacy commonly used in the eHealth field is parallel to the concept of health literacy perceived as a crucial determinant of health by health promotion specialists. As the rationale for the development of the concept of eHealth literacy was related to the growing use of the Internet for accessing health-related content, the most popular tools for its assessment are focused on the assessment of abilities related to handling internet-based health-related information.

The Special Issue on “eHealth Literacy” is planned as an occasion for demonstrating the synergies between eHealth and public health. Therefore, submissions focusing on following issues are particularly welcome:

  • the relationship between eHealth literacy and health literacy in various populations;
  • the revised definition and perception of eHealth literacy adjusted to the current stage of eHealth development;
  • the validation of new tools for measuring eHealth literacy;
  • the impact of eHealth literacy on health-related opinions and health behaviours as well as on the utilisation of health services and self-management;
  • approaches to developing eHealth literacy and the effectiveness of applied interventions.

Apart from these topics, all papers addressing eHealth literacy and presenting related studies are encouraged. Researchers are invited to contribute novel work to be considered for publication in this Special Issue. Submissions should include original articles, critical reviews (systematic reviews or meta-analyses), or brief reports.

Dr. Mariusz Duplaga
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • eHealth literacy
  • health literacy
  • health information
  • health behaviors
  • utilization of health services

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
The Determinants of Conspiracy Beliefs Related to the COVID-19 Pandemic in a Nationally Representative Sample of Internet Users
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(21), 7818; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17217818 - 26 Oct 2020
Cited by 22 | Viewed by 2686
Abstract
An overwhelming flood of misinformation is accompanying the pandemic of COVID-19. Fake news and conspiracy theories are so prevalent that the World Health Organization started as early as February 2020 to use the term “infodemic”. This paper is focused on the assessment of [...] Read more.
An overwhelming flood of misinformation is accompanying the pandemic of COVID-19. Fake news and conspiracy theories are so prevalent that the World Health Organization started as early as February 2020 to use the term “infodemic”. This paper is focused on the assessment of the prevalence of beliefs in conspiracy theories related to COVID-19 in Polish society. The association of support for conspiracy theories with sociodemographic variables, health literacy (HL) and eHealth literacy (eHL) was studied. The analysis reported here was based on the data from an online survey of a representative sample (n = 1002) of the adult population of Polish Internet users. The multivariate linear regression for the COVID-19-related conspiracy belief score (CCBS) and logistic regression models for the support of individual conspiracy theories was developed. The percentage of supporters of particular conspiracy theories in the study sample ranged from 43% to 56%. The CCBS was significantly associated with age, education level, vocational status and both HL and eHL. However, it was lower for persons with higher HL (regression coefficient (B) = −0.04, p < 0.001) but higher for those with higher eHL (B = 0.04, p = 0.038). The most influential predictors of CCBS were age (standardised regression coefficient (β) = −0.21) and education level (β from 0.08 to 0.16 for respondents with lower education levels and those with master’s degrees). In conclusion, younger persons rather than older, those with a lower rather than with a higher level of education, employees rather than students and persons with lower rather than higher HL were more likely to believe the conspiracy theories. Surprisingly, contrary to expectations, higher eHL was significantly associated with greater belief in such theories. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue eHealth Literacy)
Article
Digital Healthy Diet Literacy and Self-Perceived Eating Behavior Change during COVID-19 Pandemic among Undergraduate Nursing and Medical Students: A Rapid Online Survey
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(19), 7185; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17197185 - 30 Sep 2020
Cited by 17 | Viewed by 5496
Abstract
Assessing healthy diet literacy and eating behaviors is critical for identifying appropriate public health responses to the COVID-19 pandemic. We examined the psychometric properties of digital healthy diet literacy (DDL) and its association with eating behavior changes during the COVID-19 pandemic among nursing [...] Read more.
Assessing healthy diet literacy and eating behaviors is critical for identifying appropriate public health responses to the COVID-19 pandemic. We examined the psychometric properties of digital healthy diet literacy (DDL) and its association with eating behavior changes during the COVID-19 pandemic among nursing and medical students. We conducted a cross-sectional study from 7 April to 31 May 2020 at 10 public universities in Vietnam, in which 7616 undergraduate students aged 19–27 completed an online survey to assess socio-demographics, clinical parameters, health literacy (HL), DDL, and health-related behaviors. Four items of the DDL scale loaded on one component explained 71.32%, 67.12%, and 72.47% of the scale variances for the overall sample, nursing, and medical students, respectively. The DDL scale was found to have satisfactory item-scale convergent validity and criterion validity, high internal consistency reliability, and no floor or ceiling effect. Of all, 42.8% of students reported healthier eating behavior during the pandemic. A 10-index score increment of DDL was associated with 18%, 23%, and 17% increased likelihood of healthier eating behavior during the pandemic for the overall sample (OR, 1.18; 95%CI, 1.13, 1.24; p < 0.001), nursing students (OR, 1.23; 95%CI, 1.10, 1.35; p < 0.001), and medical students (OR, 1.17; 95%CI, 1.11, 1.24; p < 0.001), respectively. The DDL scale is a valid and reliable tool for the quick assessment of digital healthy diet literacy. Students with higher DDL scores had a higher likelihood of healthier eating behavior during the pandemic. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue eHealth Literacy)
Article
Social Networking Sites and Perceived Content Influence: An Exploratory Analysis from Focus Groups with French Adolescents
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(19), 7025; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17197025 - 25 Sep 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1204
Abstract
Social networking sites (SNSs) are invested in heavily by marketers aiming to reach a growing number of consumers. Concerns regarding the influence of posts displayed on SNSs in relation to behaviour were raised, in particular the promotion of ill-health behaviour directed to adolescents [...] Read more.
Social networking sites (SNSs) are invested in heavily by marketers aiming to reach a growing number of consumers. Concerns regarding the influence of posts displayed on SNSs in relation to behaviour were raised, in particular the promotion of ill-health behaviour directed to adolescents who may be at risk from suggestible practices. Although adolescents tend to be critical towards traditional forms of advertising, little is known about their perception of influencing strategies developed online, especially where sponsor- and user-generated content coexist. This exploratory study aims to gather information directly from adolescents about their use of SNSs their awareness of the influence that SNS content may have, particularly when it comes to tobacco and alcohol messages. Ten focus groups were conducted with 39 adolescents (11–16 years old; 56.4% male). Qualitative analysis documents the differences associated with adolescents’ favourite SNSs. The different parameters linked to each SNS and the expectation to find entertaining content and values associated with friendship may decrease adolescents’ perception of potential risk for health associated with SNS use. Authors advocate for the development of educational programs based on eHealth literacy and the use of social marketing techniques to facilitate and motivate adolescents to develop their competences. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue eHealth Literacy)
Article
Associations of eHealth Literacy with Obtaining Knowledge about Colorectal Cancer among Internet Users Accessing a Reputable Cancer Website: Internet-Based Survey Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(9), 3302; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17093302 - 09 May 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1083
Abstract
Examining the associations of eHealth literacy (eHL) with obtaining health knowledge from websites would help to clarify the causal pathway between eHL and health knowledge. This study aimed to compare the results obtained from Internet users with high or low eHL in accessing [...] Read more.
Examining the associations of eHealth literacy (eHL) with obtaining health knowledge from websites would help to clarify the causal pathway between eHL and health knowledge. This study aimed to compare the results obtained from Internet users with high or low eHL in accessing a reputable cancer website to obtain colorectal cancer (CRC) knowledge. A total of 105 participants with high eHL and 103 participants with low eHL accessed a reputable CRC website managed by the National Cancer Center and responded to Internet-based surveys before and after accessing a website in 2012. Twelve responses to knowledge statements regarding CRC were selected based on item response theory, and the differences in correct responses of pre- and post-surveys by each eHL group were compared. Two statements showed a significant increase in correct responses in the high eHL group only: “Red meat intake is a risk factor” (p = 0.002), and “Obesity is a risk factor” (p = 0.029), whereas only one response did so in the low eHL group: “Bloody stools are a symptom” (p = 0.004). Low eHL Internet users appeared less capable of obtaining knowledge of CRC by accessing information from a reputable cancer website than high eHL Internet users. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue eHealth Literacy)
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