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Special Issue "Community Drug Checking to Reduce Harms"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2022 | Viewed by 1359

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Bruce B. Wallace
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Social Work, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC1700, Canada
Interests: substance use; harm reduction; drug checking; health equity; community-based research
Prof. Dr. Tessa Parkes
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Stirling, Scotland FK84LA, UK
Interests: substance use; mental health; homelessness; inclusion health; drug checking; intervention development; policy analysis; peer support
Dr. Hannah Carver
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Stirling, Scotland FK84LA, UK
Interests: substance use; harm reduction; drug checking; homelessness; qualitative research; peer support; inclusion health

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This special issue aims to provide a unique space for researchers and practitioners to publish work on drug checking in community settings. Drug checking services offer people who use drugs and others information on the contents of their drugs to help them to make more informed decisions. While drug checking has often been associated with festival and nightlife settings, there has been a rapid increase in interest and research focused on community drug checking services, often as a response to the unpredictable illicit drug markets and unprecedented rates of overdose. These services seek to respond to a whole region and be more permanent and integrated within overall harm reduction and health services. This special issue will publish research and policy and practice commentaries generated from community drug checking services across the world and provide a ‘go to place’ for those wishing to develop their own services or to share learning. A key advantage of this special edition is that it will help fill an identified knowledge gap in relation to models of community drug checking and questions surrounding implementation, operation, impact and practice-based theory. As guest editors we are keen to hear from anyone that would like to make a contribution so please get in touch. 

Dr. Bruce B. Wallace
Prof. Dr. Tessa Parkes
Dr. Hannah Carver
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • drug checking
  • fixed-site
  • community based
  • harm reduction
  • point-of-care

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Review
A Realist Review of How Community-Based Drug Checking Services Could Be Designed and Implemented to Promote Engagement of People Who Use Drugs
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(19), 11960; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191911960 - 22 Sep 2022
Viewed by 722
Abstract
With rising numbers of drug-related deaths in the UK and globally, exploration of interventions that seek to reduce drug-related harm is essential. Drug checking services (DCS) allow people to submit drug samples for chemical analysis and receive feedback about the sample, as well [...] Read more.
With rising numbers of drug-related deaths in the UK and globally, exploration of interventions that seek to reduce drug-related harm is essential. Drug checking services (DCS) allow people to submit drug samples for chemical analysis and receive feedback about the sample, as well as harm reduction advice. The use of DCS is often linked to festival and/or nightlife settings and to so-called ‘recreational’ drug use, but research has also shown the potential of community-based DCS as an intervention serving more varied demographics of people who use drugs, including more marginalised individuals and those experiencing drug dependence. Whilst there is a growing evidence base on the effectiveness of drug checking as a harm reduction intervention, there is still limited evidence of the underlying mechanisms and processes within DCS which may aid implementation and subsequent engagement of people who use drugs. This presents a challenge to understanding why engagement differs across types of DCS, and how best to develop and deliver services across different contexts and for different populations. To explore the contexts and mechanisms which impact engagement in community-based DCS, a realist review was undertaken to synthesise the international evidence for the delivery and implementation of DCS. There were 133 sources included in the review. From these sources the underlying contexts, mechanisms, and outcomes relating to DCS implementation and engagement were developed and refined into seven programme theories. The findings of this review are theoretically novel and hold practical relevance for the design of DCS, with implications for optimisation, tailoring, and implementing services to reach individuals in different settings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Community Drug Checking to Reduce Harms)
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