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Disability, Ageing, and Social Capital

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Economics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2021) | Viewed by 25415

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
1. Department of Applied Economics, University of Malaga, Malaga, Spain
2. London School of Economics, London WC2A 2AE, UK
Interests: health economics; labour economics; people with disabilities; the elderly; discrimination; working conditions; loneliness; sports; subjective well-being; women; time use; sleep; tourism

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I am pleased to announce this Special Issue entitled “Disability, Ageing and Social Capital” for the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH). In recent decades, social inclusion of people with disabilities has attracted significant attention from policy makers, governments, disability organizations, health care professionals, and researchers, among others. According to the existing literature, people with disabilities are more likely than people without disabilities to report higher levels of social isolation, labour discrimination, unhappiness, loneliness and poverty. Within this context, this Special Issue seeks to shed further light on the relevance and contribution of the main components of social capital for the case of people with disabilities, particularly for those at older ages.   

Studies on the following topics are welcome for this Special Issue:

  • The association between social gatherings, leisure activities and well-being.
  • Contribution of active ageing to increasing social capital of older people with disabilities.
  • Comparative analyses. Comparisons including emerging and developing countries will be welcomed.
  • Assessment and comparison of loneliness scores by an international perspective.
  • Importance of labour status, social network composition, personality and household characteristics to explain the levels of social inclusion.

Prof. Dr. Ricardo Pagan
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • People with disabilities
  • Social gatherings
  • Leisure activities
  • Relational goods
  • Well-being
  • Active ageing
  • Loneliness
  • Labour status and working time
  • Entrepreneurs
  • Big five personality traits

Published Papers (9 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 2022 KiB  
Article
An Analysis of the Social and Economic Costs of Breast Cancer in Italy
by Francesco Saverio Mennini, Marco Trabucco Aurilio, Simone Gazzillo, Claudia Nardone, Paolo Sciattella, Andrea Marcellusi, Raffaele Migliorini, Valerio Sciannamea, Andrea Piccioni, Matteo Bolcato and Sandro Barni
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(17), 9005; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18179005 - 26 Aug 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2175
Abstract
Background: Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer affecting women and it represents an important economic burden. The aim of this study was to estimate the socio-economic burden of breast cancer (BC) in Italy both from the National Health Service (NHS) and the [...] Read more.
Background: Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer affecting women and it represents an important economic burden. The aim of this study was to estimate the socio-economic burden of breast cancer (BC) in Italy both from the National Health Service (NHS) and the government perspectives (costs borne by the social security system). Methods: The economic analysis was based on the costs incurred by the NHS from 2008 to 2016 (direct costs related to hospitalizations) and by the National Social Security Institute (INPS) from 2009 to 2015 (costs of social security benefits) for patients with breast cancer. The analysis was based on the Hospital Information System (HIS) and Disability Insurance Awards databases. For both databases, patients affected by a malignant neoplasm of the female breast, carcinoma in situ, or secondary malignant neoplasm of the breast were considered. Results: Results show that more than 75,000 women were hospitalized for breast cancer every year, with an overall cost for hospitalization of about €300 million per year. From the Social Security analysis, a number of 29,000 beneficiaries each year was estimated. Considering per patient social costs, breast cancer at the primary stage cost €8828 per year, while secondary neoplasms cost €9780, with an average total economic burden of €257 million per year. Conclusions: This analysis focused on the economic impact of breast cancer in Italy, showing that an advanced stage of the disease was associated with a higher cost. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Disability, Ageing, and Social Capital)
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23 pages, 1648 KiB  
Article
Disability, Human Resources and Behavioral Economics: The Labour Inclusion Case of Ilunion Hotels of the Costa del Sol (Spain)
by Marco Antonio Cruz-Morato, Carmen Dueñas-Zambrana and Josefa García-Mestanza
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(15), 7932; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18157932 - 27 Jul 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2403
Abstract
The situation of labour inclusion of people with disabilities in Spain is still too negative, in spite of the different efforts carried out by public and private sector. Previous research points to social discrimination as one of the main causes of the situation. [...] Read more.
The situation of labour inclusion of people with disabilities in Spain is still too negative, in spite of the different efforts carried out by public and private sector. Previous research points to social discrimination as one of the main causes of the situation. Ilunion Hotels is one of the most important hotel companies in Spain focused on labour inclusion of people with disabilities. The objective of this paper is to explore the social inclusion case of Ilunion Hotels of the Costa del Sol, the actions that they have developed to improve the labour integration of this collective, based on a behavioral economics theoretical model (with a high relevance of the influence of social stigma, stress theories and coping to stress responses). We look into the specific situation of two of the three hotels developed as Special Employment Centres (sheltered employment contexts defined by Spanish legislation) and the possible impact of their Support Units for Professional Activity. Case study methodology is considered the most appropriate, according to the research objective, supported by semi-structured interviews with the hotel managers. The results show that, although Special Employment Centres are effective in improving labour integration in the short term and could contribute to change the long-term social perspectives about workers with disabilities, they could be also reinforcing the social stigma existing in the ordinary market. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Disability, Ageing, and Social Capital)
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11 pages, 341 KiB  
Article
Explanatory Factors of Burnout in a Sample of Workers with Disabilities from the Special Employment Centres (SEC) of the Amica Association, Spain
by Isabel Gutierrez-Martínez, Josefa González-Santos, Paula Rodríguez-Fernández, Alfredo Jiménez-Eguizábal, Jose Antonio del Barrio-del Campo and Jerónimo J. González-Bernal
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 5036; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18095036 - 10 May 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2118
Abstract
Background: we have based our study on the fact that the labour market is progressively becoming more accessible for people with disabilities. This investigation aims to identify the factors that contribute to high levels of work-related stress in a group of disabled individuals [...] Read more.
Background: we have based our study on the fact that the labour market is progressively becoming more accessible for people with disabilities. This investigation aims to identify the factors that contribute to high levels of work-related stress in a group of disabled individuals in order to develop policies to prevent it and promote the health of the workforce. Methods: 131 workers from two Special Employment Centres (SECs) of the Amica Association in Cantabria (Spain) participated in the study. Sociodemographic and job-related variables were collected using a questionnaire. Work-related stress was evaluated using the Maslach Burnout Inventory General Survey (MBI-GS), which analyzes emotional exhaustion, cynicism and personal efficacy. Results: the main explanatory factors for higher levels of emotional exhaustion were more than 5 years of service in the company (OR 3.235–IC 95% 1.392–7.519; p = 0.006) and bad job satisfaction (OR 7.615–IC 95% 2.467–23.503; p = 0.0001); higher levels of cynicism were also explained by bad job satisfaction (OR 8.599–IC 95% 2.481–29.799; p = 0.001). Conclusions: future research is needed to facilitate the design of company policies and promote the well-being of the disabled population in the workplace, to avoid pathological conditions such as burnout syndrome. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Disability, Ageing, and Social Capital)
16 pages, 1178 KiB  
Article
Gender and Age Differences in Loneliness: Evidence for People without and with Disabilities
by Ricardo Pagan
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(24), 9176; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17249176 - 08 Dec 2020
Cited by 29 | Viewed by 3764
Abstract
This study examines the relationships between loneliness, gender, and age for people without and with disabilities (moderate versus severe) in Germany. Using data taken from the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP) for the years 2013 and 2017 and using the UCLA (University of California, [...] Read more.
This study examines the relationships between loneliness, gender, and age for people without and with disabilities (moderate versus severe) in Germany. Using data taken from the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP) for the years 2013 and 2017 and using the UCLA (University of California, Los Angeles) Loneliness Scale, in general we found that males report lower loneliness scores as compared to those for females. Furthermore, we found a strong association between loneliness and the individual’s age, but with differences according to gender and disability status. For example, for males with severe disabilities levels of loneliness decrease with age, whereas for females with severe disabilities the opposite result is found. In addition, we found that participation in leisure activities and having a higher frequency of contacts with family, friends, and social online networks (measured by the relational time index) contribute to reducing loneliness for all individuals. From a public policy perspective, it is necessary to undertake the design, promotion, and implementation of instrumental, emotional, and social support measures for people with disabilities (in particular for females that are severely limited in their daily activities), which can contribute to reducing their loneliness scores and increasing their levels of life satisfaction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Disability, Ageing, and Social Capital)
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14 pages, 563 KiB  
Article
Managers’ Conceptions and Their Effects on the Perception of Employees with Disabilities
by Antônio Luiz Marques, Marina Romeo, Marjorye Matalinares and Montserrat Yepes-Baldó
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(19), 7039; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17197039 - 25 Sep 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3180
Abstract
The research aimed to identify managers’ conceptions of disability and the relationship that was established between these conceptions and their perception of the persons with disabilities (PWD) performance, bond, benefits of hiring, and training needs. 257 managers answered a questionnaire in order to [...] Read more.
The research aimed to identify managers’ conceptions of disability and the relationship that was established between these conceptions and their perception of the persons with disabilities (PWD) performance, bond, benefits of hiring, and training needs. 257 managers answered a questionnaire in order to identify conceptions of disability in organizations. Descriptive statistics, factorial analysis, and hierarchical analysis of grouping were performed while using IBM Statistic 20.0.0. The results show that managers who have the spiritual and the conception based on inclusion perceive the insertion of PWD as beneficial to the organization. Those who conceive disability as a question of normality perceive the PWD performance as inferior to those without disabilities, which implies that PWDs should be segregated; and, the managers who perceive disability as a social problem are likely to place PWDs in the workplace according to their potential. The results can be fruitfully used by managers, human resources’ professionals, academics, and the society to promote inclusion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Disability, Ageing, and Social Capital)
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18 pages, 764 KiB  
Article
Ambassador of People with Disabilities in the Workplace—Conducive Demographic and Professional Characteristics
by Urszula Załuska, Alicja Grześkowiak, Cyprian Kozyra and Dorota Kwiatkowska-Ciotucha
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(19), 7036; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17197036 - 25 Sep 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2315
Abstract
This paper introduces into the analysis the concept of the ambassador of people with disability in the workplace. A kind and friendly person in the workplace, who creates a positive atmosphere around people with disabilities, may play a crucial role in their adaptation [...] Read more.
This paper introduces into the analysis the concept of the ambassador of people with disability in the workplace. A kind and friendly person in the workplace, who creates a positive atmosphere around people with disabilities, may play a crucial role in their adaptation on the open labor market. Presence of such a person is especially important in entities that did not previously employ people with disabilities. It is vital that employers who would like to employ people with disability possess knowledge about demographic and professional characteristics that predispose employees to perform this special role. On the one hand, in this article we attempted to evaluate the differentiation in the perception of the issue of disability due to demographic and professional characteristics of respondents, and, on the other hand, to identify features that favor being an “ambassador of people with disabilities” in the workplace. The study was conducted in 2019 on the representative samples of Internet users from 8 European countries using Computer-Assisted Internet Interviews. For the purposes of the study, we used the Attitudes to Disability Scale WHOQOL Group test and a proprietary questionnaire. As for the methods of analysis, we relied on the classical analysis of variance and logistic regression. The conducted study showed that the perception of the issue of disability is significantly related to demographic and professional characteristics of respondents, and that the role of the ambassador is the most appropriate for a middle-aged woman with a good knowledge of disability issues, indecisive in the workplace. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Disability, Ageing, and Social Capital)
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17 pages, 335 KiB  
Article
Disability-Related Questions for Administrative Datasets
by Rosamond H. Madden, Sue Lukersmith, Qingsheng Zhou, Melita Glasgow and Scott Johnston
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(15), 5435; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17155435 - 28 Jul 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2130
Abstract
High rates of unemployment among people with disability are long-standing and persistent problems worldwide. For public policy, estimates of prevalence and population profiles are required for designing support schemes such as Australia’s National Disability Insurance Scheme; for monitoring implementation of the United Nations [...] Read more.
High rates of unemployment among people with disability are long-standing and persistent problems worldwide. For public policy, estimates of prevalence and population profiles are required for designing support schemes such as Australia’s National Disability Insurance Scheme; for monitoring implementation of the United Nations Convention on Rights of Persons with Disabilities; and for monitoring service access, participation, and equity for people with disability in mainstream systems including employment. In the public sector, creating a succinct identifier for disability in administrative systems is a key challenge for public policy design and monitoring. This requires concise methods of identifying people with disability within systems, producing data comparable with population data to gauge accessibility and equity. We aimed to create disability-related questions of value to the purposes of an Australian state and contribute to literature on parsimonious and respectful disability identification for wider application. The research, completed in 2017, involved mapping and identification of key disability concepts for inclusion in new questions, focus groups to refine wording of new questions, and online surveys of employees evaluating two potential new question sets on the topic of disability and environment. Recommendations for new disability-related questions and possible new data collection processes are being considered and used by the leading state authority. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Disability, Ageing, and Social Capital)
10 pages, 296 KiB  
Article
Involving the Person with Dementia in Crisis Planning: Focus Groups with Crisis Intervention Teams
by Alessandro Bosco, Justine Schneider, Claudio Di Lorito, Emma Broome, Donna Maria Coleston-Shields and Martin Orrell
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(15), 5412; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17155412 - 28 Jul 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2194
Abstract
Dementia leads to progressive critical situations that can escalate to a crisis episode if not adequately managed. A crisis may also resolve spontaneously, or not resolve after receiving professional support. Because of the intensity of the crisis, the extent to which the person [...] Read more.
Dementia leads to progressive critical situations that can escalate to a crisis episode if not adequately managed. A crisis may also resolve spontaneously, or not resolve after receiving professional support. Because of the intensity of the crisis, the extent to which the person engages in decision making for their own care is often decreased. In UK mental health services, ‘crisis teams’ work to avert the breakdown of support arrangements and to avoid admissions to hospital or long-term care where possible. This study aimed to explore the views of crisis teams about promoting the involvement of the person with dementia in decision-making at all points in the care pathway, here defined as co-production. The staff of crisis teams from three NHS Trusts in the UK were interviewed through focus groups. Data were analysed using framework analysis. Three focus groups were run with 22 staff members. Data clustered around strategies used to promote the active involvement of the person with dementia, and the challenges experienced when delivering the care. Staff members reported that achieving a therapeutic relationship was fundamental to successful co-production. Miscommunication and/or lack of proper contact between the team and the individuals and carers receiving support adversely affected the quality of care. Making service users aware of the support provided by crisis teams before they need this may help promote a positive therapeutic relationship and effective care management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Disability, Ageing, and Social Capital)
20 pages, 3367 KiB  
Article
The Impact of a Dementia-Friendly Exercise Class on People Living with Dementia: A Mixed-Methods Study
by Annabelle Long, Claudio Di Lorito, Pip Logan, Vicky Booth, Louise Howe, Vicky Hood-Moore and Veronika van der Wardt
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(12), 4562; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17124562 - 24 Jun 2020
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 4003
Abstract
Exercise has multiple benefits for people living with dementia. A programme of group exercise classes for people with dementia and their family carers has been established in a University sports centre. This study aims to explore the impact of this programme on participants [...] Read more.
Exercise has multiple benefits for people living with dementia. A programme of group exercise classes for people with dementia and their family carers has been established in a University sports centre. This study aims to explore the impact of this programme on participants with dementia and their carers. A mixed-methods design including a prospective, repeated measures cohort study followed by focus groups was employed. Physiological and cognitive outcome measures were repeated at baseline and three months in a cohort of people with dementia attending a group exercise class. Focus groups on the participants’ experiences and their perceptions of the impact of the exercise class on their lives were then conducted. The results were analysed and mapped on a model, to illustrate the components that most likely promote participation. Sixteen participants (n = 8 with dementia, and n = 8 carers) were recruited, and completed both baseline and follow up assessments. Positive mean differences were found in physical activity (4.44), loneliness (1.75), mood (1.33) and cognition (1.13). Ten participants were included in the focus groups, which found that accessibility of the exercise venue, opportunities for socialisation and staff who were experienced working with people living with dementia were key to participants reporting benefits. The four key themes from the focus group data were synthesised to produce a model outlining the components that might generate a positive impact of the exercise classes and promote participation. Exercise classes for people with dementia can be delivered with success in novel environments such as University sports centres. There is some indication of improvement over a short period of time. The model derived from this study will inform strategies to promote attendance at dementia-friendly exercise classes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Disability, Ageing, and Social Capital)
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