ijerph-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Effects of Environmental Exposures on the Development and Severity of Asthma, COPD and Lung Cancer"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2023 | Viewed by 1603

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Gabriele Grunig
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Environmental Medicine and Division of Pulmonary Medicine in the Department of Medicine, New York University Grossman School of Medicine, Tuxedo, NY 10987, USA
Interests: pulmonary hypertension; asthma; lung immunology; effects of PM2.5 exposure; effects of e-cigarette exposure on health; World Trade Center induced lung diseases
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Nedim Durmus
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Medicine, New York University Grossman School of Medicine, Tuxedo, NY 10987, USA
Interests: asthma; lung cancer; pharmacology; diseases associated with the World Trade Center Disaster (particularly chronic respiratory diseases and cancer)

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

Environmental exposures affect human health mostly via respiratory system. Increased urbanization, time spent indoors, antibiotic usage combined with exposure to indoor and outdoor air and traffic pollution, fungi, infectious agents, tobacco smoke are risk factors for the development and exacerbation of chronic inflammatory diseases of the lungs.  Among these, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have the best documented relationship with environmental exposures. Pulmonary vascular disease including pulmonary hypertension can also be induced by environmental pollution, including cigarette smoke or burn pit dust exposure. 

Among all kinds of cancers, lung cancer remains the leading type in both incidence and mortality, with 2.1 million new cases and 1.8 million deaths predicted in 2018 in USA. This means that nearly one in five (18.4%) cancer deaths is caused by lung cancer and lung cancer rates and trends vary substantially by sex, age, race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and geography because of differences in historical smoking patterns. There is a rise in incidence of lung cancer among non-smokers and this can be attributed to environmental and occupational exposure to various kinds of hazardous substances. Target mutations are high in lung cancer among non-smokers when compared to smokers. 

This special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH) focuses on the current state of knowledge on the links between environmental exposures and chronic inflammatory lung diseases (e.g. asthma, COPD, pulmonary vascular disease) or lung cancer, including metastatic lung cancer. New research papers, translational studies reviews, and conference papers are welcome to this issue. Papers dealing with environmental exposures other than smoking in lung cancer are preferable.  For this Special Issue, papers are also invited that focus on optimizing green-blue space solutions for urban settlements for the prevention or mitigation of environmentally induced diseases of the lungs. 

The special issue will be mainly divided into two subsections

  1. Effects of environmental exposures in the development and severity of chronic inflammatory lung diseases (e.g., asthma, COPD, pulmonary vascular disease)
  2. Effects of environmental exposures in the development and aggressiveness of lung cancer

Prof. Dr. Gabriele Grunig
Dr. Nedim Durmus
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • environmental exposures
  • asthma
  • COPD
  • pulmonary vascular diseases
  • pulmonary hypertension
  • lung cancer
  • metastatic lung cancer

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Influence of Farm Environment on Asthma during the Life Course: A Population-Based Birth Cohort Study in Northern Finland
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(3), 2128; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20032128 - 24 Jan 2023
Viewed by 251
Abstract
We investigated the influence of a farming environment on asthma at three time points from birth to 46 years using the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 (n = 10,926). The prevalence of asthma was investigated by postal questionnaires at 14, 31 and 46 [...] Read more.
We investigated the influence of a farming environment on asthma at three time points from birth to 46 years using the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 (n = 10,926). The prevalence of asthma was investigated by postal questionnaires at 14, 31 and 46 years of age. Exposure to a farming environment was assessed by a postal questionnaire at birth and at 31 and 46 years of age. Odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for the prevalence of asthma were obtained from multinomial logistic regression, stratified by sex. Being born in a farmer family was potentially causally associated with lower risk of asthma in males at 31 years of age (OR 0.56, 95% CI 0.37, 0.85) and in females at 46 years of age (OR 0.64, 95% CI 0.44, 0.95). Working as a farmer was not associated with asthma. Exposure to a farming environment in childhood may have a lifelong impact on developing asthma from birth through young adulthood and until middle age, indicating that ‘immune deviation’ may persist throughout life. Full article
Article
Sex-Specific Association between Environmental Tobacco Smoke Exposure and Asthma Severity among Adults with Current Asthma
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(9), 5036; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19095036 - 21 Apr 2022
Viewed by 1040
Abstract
Background: Tobacco smoke has been associated with negative health outcomes, including those with chronic respiratory illnesses, such as asthma. This study aimed to assess the relationship between exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), as well as tobacco use (cigarette and electronic cigarettes), on [...] Read more.
Background: Tobacco smoke has been associated with negative health outcomes, including those with chronic respiratory illnesses, such as asthma. This study aimed to assess the relationship between exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), as well as tobacco use (cigarette and electronic cigarettes), on asthma severity among adults with current asthma, with stratification by sex to understand potential biological sex differences. Methods: The study population consisted of Californian adults 18 years or older with self-reported physician/health care diagnosis of asthma and still having current asthma from 2020 California Health Interview Survey. All descriptive statistics and analyses were sex-stratified and survey-weighted. Crosstabulations were used to understand the association between asthma attack and ETS or firsthand smoke exposure, while binary logistic regression models were used to assess the effect of ETS exposure, current smoking status, and control variables on asthma attack in the past 12 months, with a sub-analysis among non-smoking adults with asthma. Results: Among the primary variable of interest, 35% of males and 30% of females reported ETS exposure in the past 12 months, while 13% of males and 6% of females reported being a current smoker. Past year asthma attack was reported among 43% and 55% of males and females, respectively. Among males, after adjusting for all control variables, asthma attack was significantly higher among those with ETS exposure (OR: 1.75, 95% CI: 1.01–3.02) and among current smokers (OR: 3.82, 95% CI: 1.49, 9.81). Male non-smokers with ETS exposure had a 109% higher odds of asthma attack, compared to non-exposure individuals. Conclusion: Using a population-based survey, our results highlight the ongoing burden of tobacco use and exposure particularly among males with current asthma, further corroborate the literature on the relationship between tobacco and asthma, and highlight putative sex-specific outcomes. Full article
Back to TopTop