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Hazards in Aquatic Ecosystems: Ecological, Environmental, and Human Health Impacts

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2025 | Viewed by 1782

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Research Group of Experimental and Applied Aquatic Ecology, Federal University of the State of Rio de Janeiro (UNIRIO), Rio de Janeiro 22290-240, Brazil
Interests: aquaculture and fisheries; coastal pollution; biomarkers; bioindicators and sentinel species; ecotoxicology; emerging contaminants; harmful algal blooms; marine ecology; metals; plastic pollution

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Guest Editor
Laboratory of Theoretical and Applied Ichthyology, Department of Ecology and Marine Resources, Federal University of the State of Rio de Janeiro (UNIRIO), Rio de Janeiro 22290-240, Brazil
Interests: aquatic ecology; fish ecology; fisheries; freshwater ecosystems; habitats; invasive species; hydroelectric reservoir

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Center for Functional Ecology (CFE), University of Coimbra, 3000-456 Coimbra, Portugal
2. LAQV-REQUIMTE, University of Coimbra, 55142 Porto, Portugal
Interests: ecology; environmental risk assessment; contaminants; food safety

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Aquatic environments provide several ecosystem services that are essential to human beings. However, these ecosystems are experiencing unprecedented levels of change and impacts due to human activities that establish sources of contaminants and pollutants threatening biodiversity, environmental and human health.

This Special Issue will focus on multiple hazards in aquatic ecosystems with  ecological, environmental, and human health impacts, including chemical contamination, eutrophication, fecal contamination, harmful algal blooms (HABs), invasive species, metals, plastic pollution (e.g., macro, meso, micro and nano), and wastewater and solid waste pollution. We welcome experimental and in situ research performed in coastal, marine, or freshwater environments.

The scope of this Special Issue includes, but is not limited to, the following topics: (1) sources, distribution, and fate of contaminants or pollutants in aquatic systems; (2) toxicity and/or impacts of contaminants or pollutants on aquatic organisms and potential risk for human; (3) bioindicators or sentinel species in aquatic systems; (4) impacts of human activities in aquatic ecosystems; (5) environmental risk assessment.

For this Special Issue, different types of manuscripts (research, reviews, and case reports) within the scope of “Hazards in Aquatic Ecosystems” will be considered for publication.

Dr. Raquel A. F. Neves
Dr. Luciano Neves dos Santos
Dr. Sara Leston
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • chemical contaminants
  • emerging contaminants
  • eutrophication
  • fecal contamination
  • harmful algal blooms (HABs)
  • invasive species
  • metals
  • plastic pollution
  • solid wastes
  • wastewater

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

14 pages, 1453 KiB  
Article
First Record of Microplastic Contamination in the Non-Native Dark False Mussel Mytilopsis leucophaeata (Bivalvia: Dreissenidae) in a Coastal Urban Lagoon
by Raquel A. F. Neves, Tâmara B. Guimarães and Luciano N. Santos
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2024, 21(1), 44; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph21010044 - 27 Dec 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1500
Abstract
Microplastic contamination is a global concern due to its conspicuous presence in aquatic ecosystems and its toxic nature to environmental and human health. False mussels are among the most notable fresh- and brackish water invaders. The invasive Mytilopsis leucophaeata in Rodrigo de Freitas [...] Read more.
Microplastic contamination is a global concern due to its conspicuous presence in aquatic ecosystems and its toxic nature to environmental and human health. False mussels are among the most notable fresh- and brackish water invaders. The invasive Mytilopsis leucophaeata in Rodrigo de Freitas Lagoon-RFL (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil) is the most abundant macrofaunal invertebrate, widely established and distributed throughout the lagoon. This study aimed to assess microplastic contamination in this invasive filter feeder and evaluate its potential use as a bioindicator. Agglomerates (~100 mussels) were manually collected using a stainless-steel spatula in ten sampling areas distributed throughout the whole lagoon and kept frozen. In the laboratory, 60 individuals were sorted by area for soft-tissue digestion. Each pool of 10 soft-tissue mussels (n = 6 by area) was wet-weighted and then placed in a 150-mL decontaminated glass beaker with 50 mL of 10% KOH. Samples were heated (40 °C) for 48 h, and digested samples were filtered in glass-fiber membranes. Microplastics were found in all samples of mussels (n = 60) from RFL; the particles were mostly lower than 100 µm with a mean concentration (±SD) of 35.96 ± 47.64 MPs g wet-weight−1. Microplastics were distinguished in seven shapes with different occurrences in samples (%): fiber (43.3%); fragment (34.3%); film (16.3%); sponge/foam (4.9%); pellet (0.57%), rope/filaments (0.17%); and undefined (0.4%). Thirteen colors of microplastics were found, but transparent (54.94%), black (10.77%), and white (9.36%) were the most common. Mytilopsis leucophaeata were useful to assess microplastic contamination in RFL and might be preferentially used in other invaded brackish systems instead of native and often threatened bivalves. Our results confirm the effective application of bivalves as an indicator of coastal microplastic pollution. Full article
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