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Prevention of Intimate Partner Violence and Child Abuse: Issues and Challenges

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Maria Eriksson
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Social Science, Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, 116 28 Stockholm, Sweden
Interests: what different forms of inequality mean for the political and practical handling of men's violence against women and children

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Victimization through all forms of violence in close relationships constitutes a fundamental violation of both adults’ and children’s rights and integrity. Childhood adversity, such as exposure to intimate partner violence and child abuse, can have detrimental effects for the health and wellbeing both in the short term and in later adult life. This Special Issue welcomes contributions on the prevention of IPV and CA ranging from universal to indicated measures, for example, policy measures including changes to the law and guidance for practitioners, new organizational approaches, and research-based methods for prevention, assessment, support, and treatment. Contributions highlighting issues of interacting inequalities, diversity, and special vulnerabilities are especially welcome.

Prof. Dr. Maria Eriksson
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • child abuse
  • diversity
  • intersectionality
  • intimate partner violence
  • prevention
  • rights

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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10 pages, 439 KiB  
Article
Modern Rape Myths: Justifying Victim and Perpetrator Blame in Sexual Violence
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(3), 1663; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20031663 - 17 Jan 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2143
Abstract
Rape myths are beliefs, stereotypes, and attitudes usually false, widespread, and persistent about rape, victims, and perpetrators. They aim to deny and justify men’s sexual assault against women. This study evaluates the mediating effect of modern rape myths on the relationship between gender [...] Read more.
Rape myths are beliefs, stereotypes, and attitudes usually false, widespread, and persistent about rape, victims, and perpetrators. They aim to deny and justify men’s sexual assault against women. This study evaluates the mediating effect of modern rape myths on the relationship between gender system justification and attribution of blame to both victim and perpetrator in a fictional case of sexual violence. A total of 375 individuals residing in Chile, 255 women and 120 men, 19–81 years (M = 37.6 SD = 13.06) participated in the study. Results from a Structural Equation Model show that gender system justification is directly related to the attribution of blame to the victim, showing an indirect relationship throughout the modern rape myth. However, gender system justification and attribution of blame to the aggressor are indirectly related, being mediated by modern rape myths. The study of the relationship between the acceptance of modern rape myths, gender-specific system justification, and victim and aggressor blame for rape is a contribution to understanding beliefs justifying sexual violence against women. Full article
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Review

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18 pages, 663 KiB  
Review
Intimate Partner Violence in Khaliji Women: A Review of the Frequency and Related Factors
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(13), 6241; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20136241 - 28 Jun 2023
Viewed by 1354
Abstract
The Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC), locally known as Khaliji, is a group of six Arab nations, including Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a significant public health concern in the aforementioned [...] Read more.
The Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC), locally known as Khaliji, is a group of six Arab nations, including Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a significant public health concern in the aforementioned region, but research that synthesises this trend has remained scarce. The present narrative review examines existing research on the prevalence and frequency of IPV among Khaliji women who inhabit the GCC nations. This review synthesised studies on physical and sexual violence, emotional abuse, and controlling behaviours perpetrated by an intimate partner. The prevalence rates of IPV among Khaliji women were observed to be high: women reported facing different types of abuse from their partners, namely physical (7–71%), sexual (3.7–81%), financial (21.3–26%), and psychological (7.5–89%), which is a culmination of controlling behaviour (36.8%), emotional violence (22–69%), and social violence (34%). Existing studies in the GCC region suggest that the most endorsed IPV was psychological abuse (89%), followed by sexual violence (81%). Qualitative analysis of the content of associated factors resulted in four significant descriptors, such as victim demographics, sociocultural factors, socioeconomic factors, and perpetrator-related issues. Research on IPV is still in its nascent stages, with very few studies emanating from the GCC region. The way forward will require developing culturally appropriate interventions that address the unique risk factors for IPV among the Khaliji population, strengthening institutional responses, and increasing awareness and social support for victims of IPV. Full article
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