ijerph-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Health Promotion and Quality of Life Improvement among Patients with Prostate Cancer

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Care Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 December 2024 | Viewed by 954

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Health Disparities Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA
Interests: health disparities; social determinants of health; cancer survivorship and prevention

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Prostate cancer ranks as the second most prevalent cancer among men worldwide. With the aging population, the burden of prostate cancer is expected to increase. Despite the high 5-year relative survival rate among prostate cancer patients (e.g., >97% in the US), it is important to recognize that longevity does not necessarily guarantee a high quality of life. Thus, it is important to promote health and enhance the quality of life for individuals post prostate cancer treatment. This is particularly crucial for underserved prostate cancer survivors, including those from racial/ethnic minority backgrounds and those coping with advanced prostate cancer. Thus, I am delighted to extend an invitation for the submission of unpublished research to the Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. The scope of the issue will cover unpublished and novel research, including a wide range of methodologies such as clinical trials, interventional studies, observational studies, qualitative research, systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, health and quality of life enhancement, with a specific emphasis on racial/ethnic minority populations (such as Black, Hispanic, Asian) and other medically underserved groups affected by prostate cancer. The health and quality of life enhancement may focus on mental health or behavioral/psychosocial interventions (e.g., exercise, mind–body). Additionally, we welcome submissions examining concerns relating the quality of life in men diagnosed with advanced prostate cancer.

Dr. Dalnim Cho
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • prostate cancer
  • quality of life
  • health and well-being
  • cancer disparities
  • social determinants of health
  • advanced prostate cancer

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

11 pages, 737 KiB  
Article
A Community-Based Prostate Cancer Screening and Education Program for Asian American Men in Medically Underserved Communities
by Dalnim Cho, Beverly Gor, Hyunsoo Hwang, Xuemei Wang, Mike Hernandez, Lovell A. Jones, Jacqueline Frost, Pamela Roberson and Curtis A. Pettaway
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2024, 21(4), 415; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph21040415 - 28 Mar 2024
Viewed by 787
Abstract
This study analyzed data from a community-based prostate cancer (PCa) education and screening program (Prostate Outreach Project; POP) to enhance PCa-related knowledge among medically underserved Asian American men. It also examined PCa screening history, clinical abnormalities based on prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests and [...] Read more.
This study analyzed data from a community-based prostate cancer (PCa) education and screening program (Prostate Outreach Project; POP) to enhance PCa-related knowledge among medically underserved Asian American men. It also examined PCa screening history, clinical abnormalities based on prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests and digital rectal examination (DRE) results, and follow-up and PCa diagnosis rates. Participants—521 Asian men (251 Vietnamese, 142 Chinese, and 128 South Asians)—were offered PCa screening using PSA tests and/or DRE and an educational session on PCa. Of these men, 277 completed PCa-related knowledge surveys before and after viewing an educational video. Significant between-group differences in PCa-related knowledge were found at pre-assessment (p < 0.001) but not at post-assessment (p = 0.11), at which time all groups showed improved PCa-related knowledge. Most participants (77.9%) had never received PCa screening, but Vietnamese men had the lowest previous screening rate (17.3%). Chinese men had elevated PSA values and the highest abnormal DRE rates. Of the 125 men with abnormal screening outcomes, only 15.2% had adequate follow-up. Of the 144 men diagnosed with PCa in POP, 11.1% were Asians (seven Chinese, six Vietnamese, and three South Asian). Despite the ethnic heterogeneity among Asian men, a community outreach program may successfully enhance their PCa-related knowledge. Full article
Back to TopTop