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Traversing the Nexus: The Impact of Environmental Disruptions on Environmental Equity and Health—Finding Resilience in the Coming Decades

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2024 | Viewed by 1968

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Health Sciences, College of Health and Behavioral Studies, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA 22807, USA
Interests: environmental health; biogeochemical cycle; environmental equity; disadvantages of difference

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Co-Guest Editor
Independent Immunologist and Author, Massillon, OH 44646, USA
Interests: environmental disruptions; environmental equity; future health challenges; multidisciplinary cooperation; innovative solutions

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Both large and small environmental disruptions can have profound impacts upon health and well-being. Such disruptions include interruptions in the quality, quantity, or location of materials found naturally in the environment as well as compounds that are introduced and their distribution throughout the environment. The latter consists of any of a wide variety of materials and can include industrial and agricultural pollutants, radiation, traditional and alternative medicinal compounds, antibiotics, and personal care product residues as well as their metabolites and products of the interactions of these materials. This increases the likelihood of non-beneficial human exposures to compounds. 

Human health impacts resulting from environmental exposure can become magnified by social and economic inequities in ways that further deteriorate human health and environmental integrity in a reinforcing, non-virtuous cycle. This Special Issue is soliciting research and review articles that explore this area and/or identify innovative solutions to these challenges. These solutions may be interdisciplinary or could open the door for further discussions on this timely subject.

Prof. Dr. Catherine L. Zeman
Dr. Lisa Beltz
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • environmental health
  • biogeochemical cycle
  • environmental equity
  • disadvantages of difference

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

16 pages, 3646 KiB  
Article
Correlations between Educational Struggle, Toxic Sites by School District and Demographic Variables, with Geographical Information System Projections
by Junu Shrestha, Raihan K. Khan, Shane McClintock, John DeGroote and Catherine L. Zeman
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(24), 7160; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20247160 - 9 Dec 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1511
Abstract
This correlational study associated data on children enrolled in individualized educational plans in their K-12 schools (IEP) and an algorithm-calculated score of neurotoxins at contaminated sites located in each school district. The study also mapped and projected the correlations using Geographical Information System [...] Read more.
This correlational study associated data on children enrolled in individualized educational plans in their K-12 schools (IEP) and an algorithm-calculated score of neurotoxins at contaminated sites located in each school district. The study also mapped and projected the correlations using Geographical Information System (GIS) technology. These data were populated in ArcMap 10.5 (a GIS software) for generating maps and data to conduct geospatial analysis. A total of 1 Superfund site and 39 CERCLA sites were identified as contaminated sites for this analysis. The majority of contaminants were heavy metals such as lead, arsenic, mercury, and cadmium. The mean toxic score of all contaminated sites combined was 13.4 (SD 14.4). Correlational analysis between the IEP numbers from each school district and toxic scores from the contaminated school district sites exhibited a positive relationship (F = 23.7, p < 0.0001). Correlations were also seen among higher toxics scores, IEP numbers, and children under the age of 10 (p < 0.00052) as well as higher proportions of black students in areas with high toxics scores (p = 0.0032). Black students were also far more likely to be enrolled in an IEP (p < 0.0001). Household income and poverty percentage in contaminated areas were also correlated (p = 0.0002). Individuals without college degrees were overrepresented in high toxic score school districts (p < 0.0001). The important low socio-economic status indicator of free and reduced lunch programs also correlated with increasing toxic scores (p = 0.0012) and IEP numbers (p = 0.0416). This study emphasizes the need to account for multiple exposures to wholistically appreciate environmental factors contributing to negative health outcomes. Full article
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