Special Issue "HIV/AIDS: Transmission, Prevention and Treatment"

A special issue of Infectious Disease Reports (ISSN 2036-7449). This special issue belongs to the section "HIV-AIDS".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Giuseppe Nunnari
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Unit of Infectious Diseases, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Messina, 98100 Messina, Italy
Interests: immunology; antimicrobials; HIV; antimicrobial stewardship; public health
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) is a virus which attacks cells that help the body fight infection, making a person more vulnerable to other infections and diseases. It is spread by contact with certain bodily fluids of a person with HIV, most commonly during unprotected sex, or through sharing injection drug equipment. If left untreated, HIV can lead to the disease AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome). HIV is spread primarily through unprotected sex (including anal and oral sex), contaminated blood transfusions, hypodermic needles and from mother to child during pregnancy, delivery or breastfeeding. Some bodily fluids, such as saliva, sweat and tears, do not transmit the virus.

In 2020, about 37 million people worldwide were living with HIV and 680,000 deaths had occurred in that year. HIV/AIDS has had a large impact on society, both as an illness and as a source of discrimination. 

This Special Issue of Infectious Disease Reports is designed to enable the rapid publication and dissemination of innovative research with the aim of advancing scientific knowledge and highlighting future perspectives on the transmission, prevention and treatment of HIV/AIDS.

Prof. Dr. Giuseppe Nunnari
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Infectious Disease Reports is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • HIV
  • HIV/AIDS
  • transmission
  • HIV prevention and control
  • HIV treatment

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

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Review
Loco-Regional Treatments for Hepatocellular Carcinoma in People Living with HIV
Infect. Dis. Rep. 2022, 14(1), 43-55; https://doi.org/10.3390/idr14010006 - 07 Jan 2022
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Abstract
Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) accounts for approximately 75–90% of primary liver cancers and is the sixth most common cancer and the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. In the HIV-positive population, the risk of HCC is approximately four times higher than in the [...] Read more.
Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) accounts for approximately 75–90% of primary liver cancers and is the sixth most common cancer and the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. In the HIV-positive population, the risk of HCC is approximately four times higher than in the general population, with higher cancer-specific mortality than in HIV-negative patients. In most cases, HCC diagnosis is made in patients younger than the HIV-negative population and in the intermediate-advanced stage, thus limiting the therapeutic possibilities. Treatment choice in HIV-positive patients with HCC is subject to cancer staging, liver function and health status, as for HIV-negative and non-HIV-negative HCC patients. There are relatively few studies on the efficacy and safety in HIV-positive patients to date in loco-regional treatments for HCC. So far, literature shows that curative treatments such as radiofrequency ablation (RFA) have no significant differences in overall survival between HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients, as opposed to palliative treatments such as TACE, where there is a significant difference in overall survival. Although it can be assumed that the most recently discovered loco-regional therapies are applicable to HIV-positive patients with HCC in the same way as HIV-negative patients, further studies are needed to confirm this hypothesis. The purpose of our review is to evaluate these treatments, their efficacy, effectiveness, safety and their applicability to HIV-positive patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue HIV/AIDS: Transmission, Prevention and Treatment)

Other

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Case Report
Extra Corporeal Membrane Oxygenation in the Treatment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Related P. jirovecii Pneumonia
Infect. Dis. Rep. 2021, 13(4), 1009-1017; https://doi.org/10.3390/idr13040092 - 02 Dec 2021
Viewed by 526
Abstract
Despite the undeniable complexity one may encounter while managing critically ill patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection (HIV), intensive care unit-related mortality has declined in recent years, not only because of more efficacious antiretroviral therapy (ART) but also due to the advances in [...] Read more.
Despite the undeniable complexity one may encounter while managing critically ill patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection (HIV), intensive care unit-related mortality has declined in recent years, not only because of more efficacious antiretroviral therapy (ART) but also due to the advances in critical support. However, the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in these patients remains controversial. We report four cases of HIV-infected patients with Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PJP) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) treated with ECMO support and discuss its indications and possible role in the prevention of barotrauma and ventilator- induced lung injury (VILI). The eventually favorable clinical course of the patients that we present suggests that although immune status is an important aspect in the decision to initiate ECMO support, this technology can provide real benefit in some patients with severe HIV-related refractory ARDS. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue HIV/AIDS: Transmission, Prevention and Treatment)
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