Special Issue "Africa and its Lusophone and Spanish-Speaking Diaspora: New Horizons of Conceptualization"

A special issue of Humanities (ISSN 2076-0787).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 October 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Joanna Boampong

Centre for Latin American Studies, University of Ghana, P.O. Box LG Legon, Accra, Ghana
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Transatlantic Hispanic Studies; Latin American Studies; Hispanophone Studies; African Literatures; Postcolonial Studies; Feminist Studies

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Bearing in mind that one third of all peoples of the Americas are of African ancestry, and that the majority of the African diaspora can be found in Latin America, an engagement of the two regions must not only be acknowledged but critically promoted and actively sustained. The call for the pursuit of interdisciplinary inquiry in academia is especially pertinent to studies on Africa and its interconnections with its Spanish-speaking and Lusophone diaspora, for the scope of its purview is as vast as varied. The special edition seeks to foster reflections on the nature of the connections between Africa and its Spanish-speaking and Lusophone diaspora and its evolution over the years. The volume seeks to examine the forms that the dialogue on the two regions have taken and explore new horizons of conceptualizations that have opened up in the face of contemporary debates surrounding longstanding issues relating, among others, to the legacy of slavery, deterritorialization, race, transmigration, cultural identity formations/constructions. The volume will examine how the dialogue on these themes are evolving with a view to underscore the pressing issues of our times. Ultimately, the special issue seeks to deepen the conversations surrounding the gestures and overtures to and from both regions

Dr. Joanna Boampong
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Africa
  • Afro-Hispanic
  • Luso-Brazilian
  • Latin America
  • Lusophone
  • Afro-descendent
  • legacy of slavery
  • deterritorialization
  • race
  • transmigration
  • cultural identity formations/constructions

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle A Proposal for Afro-Hispanic Peoples and Culture as General Studies Course in African Universities
Humanities 2019, 8(1), 34; https://doi.org/10.3390/h8010034
Received: 26 November 2018 / Revised: 29 January 2019 / Accepted: 18 February 2019 / Published: 23 February 2019
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Abstract
After centuries of denial, suppression and marginalization, the contributions of Afro-Hispanics/Latinos to the arts, culture, and the Spanish spoken in the Americas is gradually gaining recognition as Afro-descendants pursue their quest for visibility and space in Spanish America. Hand in hand with this [...] Read more.
After centuries of denial, suppression and marginalization, the contributions of Afro-Hispanics/Latinos to the arts, culture, and the Spanish spoken in the Americas is gradually gaining recognition as Afro-descendants pursue their quest for visibility and space in Spanish America. Hand in hand with this development is the young generation of Afro-Latinos who, are proud to identify with the black race. Ironically, the young African student has very little knowledge of the presence and actual situation of Afro-descendants in Spanish-speaking America. This is because many African universities still follow the old colonial system which excludes knowledge of the presence and cultures of the once enslaved Africans in the Spanish speaking world. Thus, while Afro-descendants are fighting for visibility and recognition in Spanish America, they remain almost invisible in the African continent. The aim of this paper is to propose a curriculum, Afro-Hispanic Peoples and Culture, as a general studies course in African universities. Such a curriculum would create in Africa the much-needed visibility and contributions of Afro-descendants in Spanish-speaking America, and also foster collaborative works between young African academics and their counterparts in the Americas. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Language Vitality of Spanish in Equatorial Guinea: Language Use and Attitudes
Humanities 2019, 8(1), 33; https://doi.org/10.3390/h8010033
Received: 18 October 2018 / Revised: 6 February 2019 / Accepted: 17 February 2019 / Published: 21 February 2019
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Abstract
This study investigates the use of and attitudes towards, Spanish in the multilingual Republic of Equatorial Guinea, the only African country with Spanish as an official language. The Spanish dialect of Equatorial Guinea is an understudied area, although descriptive research on the Spanish [...] Read more.
This study investigates the use of and attitudes towards, Spanish in the multilingual Republic of Equatorial Guinea, the only African country with Spanish as an official language. The Spanish dialect of Equatorial Guinea is an understudied area, although descriptive research on the Spanish language spoken there began in the 1950s. Very few research studies have been carried out on the sociolinguistic dynamic of this multilingual country. Four scales of language vitality were utilized and it was demonstrated that Spanish in Equatorial Guinea is not endangered and continues to thrive. An online survey was also performed to assess Spanish language use and attitudes towards the Equatoguinean variety of Spanish. Respondents were highly educated, middle-class and spoke at least two languages. It was observed that Spanish was the functional language in almost all the sociocultural contexts or domains. Equatorial Guineans share that Spanish is important to their identity as the only Spanish-speaking country in Africa. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Hidden in Plain Sight: Tourism Planning, Afro-Colombian Society and Community in Barú, Colombia
Humanities 2019, 8(1), 22; https://doi.org/10.3390/h8010022
Received: 17 September 2018 / Revised: 16 January 2019 / Accepted: 24 January 2019 / Published: 30 January 2019
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Abstract
This article builds upon the scholarship of Alina Helg and other historians working on questions of racial identity in Colombia, and the Caribbean section of that country more specifically. Colombia is unique in that its identity is indigenous, African, as well as European. [...] Read more.
This article builds upon the scholarship of Alina Helg and other historians working on questions of racial identity in Colombia, and the Caribbean section of that country more specifically. Colombia is unique in that its identity is indigenous, African, as well as European. Its Afro-Colombian elements are often overlooked by virtue of the mestizo identity that has dominated settlement of its Andean highlands around the capital, Bogota. Using technical and social reports from tourism development on Barù Island, near Cartagena, this article explores the Afro-Colombian communities that established themselves on the island in the wake of emancipation in the mid-19th century, as well as the efforts of these communities to protect their rights. I also examine recent Constitutional Court decisions supporting the rights of Afro-Colombian communities like those on Barù against the developmental ambitions of governmental and private tourism developers who were intent on transforming the island into a mass tourism destination. The article concludes that recent legal shifts towards protecting Afro-Colombian rights secured a recent victory in favor of the islanders vis-à-vis designs of the state to impose its vision of global tourism development there. Full article
Open AccessArticle Latin American Cities: From Subservient Reproductions to Intercontinental Dialogues
Humanities 2019, 8(1), 18; https://doi.org/10.3390/h8010018
Received: 21 November 2018 / Revised: 15 January 2019 / Accepted: 17 January 2019 / Published: 22 January 2019
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Abstract
This paper investigates the circulation of ideas regarding the city among selected countries in Latin America. It discusses convergences between academic and scientific institutions and investigative weakness in partnerships between Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Colombia, and Mexico. It identifies two historical moments: one of [...] Read more.
This paper investigates the circulation of ideas regarding the city among selected countries in Latin America. It discusses convergences between academic and scientific institutions and investigative weakness in partnerships between Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Colombia, and Mexico. It identifies two historical moments: one of vertical dialogues between Latin America and central countries in the elaboration of urban plans (20th century) and another of contemporary academic exchange signalling a horizontal dialogue that is fragile and sporadic but distinct from those observed in the past. Empirical reference is obtained from the analysis of scientific events and papers published by distinguished post-graduate programs concerning urban topics in selected countries, during the time frame of 2000–2015. The methodological approach is based on a bibliographic review and content analysis. Results indicate that the old “one-way” of transfer of urban planning ideas from central countries to Latin America is changing; slowly, the continent has been growing more independent in terms of knowledge creation and circulation. Full article
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Open AccessArticle African by Exposure: Caregivers, Madness, and the Contagious Other in García Márquez’s Of Love and Other Demons and Rhys’s Wide Sargasso Sea
Humanities 2019, 8(1), 15; https://doi.org/10.3390/h8010015
Received: 19 November 2018 / Revised: 15 December 2018 / Accepted: 15 January 2019 / Published: 18 January 2019
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Abstract
The following article discusses Gabriel García Márquez’s Of Love and Other Demons and Jean Rhys’s Wide Sargasso Sea. Specifically, this article will discuss the parallel ways that two novels critique the nature of postcolonial development in the Caribbean, particularly in regard to [...] Read more.
The following article discusses Gabriel García Márquez’s Of Love and Other Demons and Jean Rhys’s Wide Sargasso Sea. Specifically, this article will discuss the parallel ways that two novels critique the nature of postcolonial development in the Caribbean, particularly in regard to race and hybridity. Within the novels, the child protagonists and their African/black creole nursemaids follow surprisingly similar plots, though the settings, contexts, and styles of the two texts differ greatly. In these two novels while the white protagonists both die because of their hybrid navigation of their environment, their nurse/mothers survive, largely because of their maintenance of African practices. In many ways, the nurse mothers’ survival and attempts to heal their charges present potential antidotes for the “disease” produced by slavery. The purpose of this paper is to explore those parallel developments in plot, and to look at the ways the two texts disrupt and reinforce colonial hegemonic norms through their depictions of both the nurses and their charges. Full article
Open AccessArticle Political Messages in African Music: Assessing Fela Anikulapo-Kuti, Lucky Dube and Alpha Blondy
Humanities 2018, 7(4), 129; https://doi.org/10.3390/h7040129
Received: 30 September 2018 / Revised: 28 November 2018 / Accepted: 30 November 2018 / Published: 6 December 2018
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Abstract
Political communication inquiry principally investigates institutions such as governments and congress, and processes such as elections and political advertising. This study takes a largely unexplored route: An assessment of political messages embedded in music, with a focus on the artistic works of three [...] Read more.
Political communication inquiry principally investigates institutions such as governments and congress, and processes such as elections and political advertising. This study takes a largely unexplored route: An assessment of political messages embedded in music, with a focus on the artistic works of three male African music icons—Fela Anikulapo-Kuti (Nigeria), Lucky Dube (South Africa), and Alpha Blondy (Côte d’Ivoire). Methodologically, a purposive sample of the lyrics of songs by the musicians was textually analyzed to identify the themes and nuances in their political messaging. Framing was the theoretical underpinning. This study determined that all three musicians were vocal against corruption, citizen marginalization, and a cessation of wars and bloodshed in the continent. Full article
Open AccessArticle From Interethnic Alliances to the “Magical Negro”: Afro-Asian Interactions in Asian Latin American Literature
Humanities 2018, 7(4), 110; https://doi.org/10.3390/h7040110
Received: 24 September 2018 / Revised: 25 October 2018 / Accepted: 2 November 2018 / Published: 5 November 2018
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Abstract
This essay studies Afro-Asian sociocultural interactions in cultural production by or about Asian Latin Americans, with an emphasis on Cuba and Brazil. Among the recurrent characters are the black slave, the china mulata, or the black ally who expresses sympathy or even [...] Read more.
This essay studies Afro-Asian sociocultural interactions in cultural production by or about Asian Latin Americans, with an emphasis on Cuba and Brazil. Among the recurrent characters are the black slave, the china mulata, or the black ally who expresses sympathy or even marries the Asian character. This reflects a common history of bondage shared by black slaves, Chinese coolies, and Japanese indentured workers, as well as a common history of marronage. These conflicts and alliances between Asians and blacks contest the official discourse of mestizaje (Spanish-indigenous dichotomies in Mexico and Andean countries, for example, or black and white binaries in Brazil and the Caribbean) that, under the guise of incorporating the other, favored whiteness while attempting to silence, ignore, or ultimately erase their worldviews and cultures. Full article
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