Youth Mental Health and Family Support

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032). This special issue belongs to the section "Community Care".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 September 2022) | Viewed by 20413

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Social Work, California State University Monterey Bay, Monterey, CA 93955, USA
Interests: children’s mental health and family; work and community support; social sustainability

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Social Work & Criminal Justice, University of Washington Tacoma, Tacoma, WA 98402, USA
Interests: resilience and economic security at the intersection of disability and community

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Social Work, Portland State University, Portland, OR 97201, USA
Interests: youth mental health; youth peer support; youth and sustainability; transition to adulthood; cultural diversity

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Young people experiencing mental health difficulties often receive treatment and support in their own communities, while living with family members. This Special Issue focuses on innovation in community-based care for young people aged 6–29, and on identifying supportive approaches that foster their success in school, higher education, employment, and social relationships. Of particular interest are services focused on youth aged 14–29 who need support to successfully transition to adulthood. Additionally, papers can examine ways in which families obtain support making it possible for young people to live in their homes or the community while they develop coping skills and successfully integrate into key settings. Particularly welcome are papers focusing on innovative strategies such as peer support for both young people experiencing mental health challenges and their family members. Of considerable interest are ways in which family members manage to care for the young people and engage in employment. We encourage the submission of articles examining social and cultural influences on these processes, and proposing and testing culturally appropriate supports for youth and family. Papers that report original quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods research, reviews of existing research studies, cross-national comparisons, and theoretical examinations of the topic are also welcomed.

Dr. Lisa M. Stewart
Dr. Claudia Sellmaier
Dr. Eileen Brennan
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Community-based mental health services
  • Culturally –appropriate supports
  • School aged youth
  • Transition-aged young people
  • Peer support
  • Family support
  • Social determinants of health

Published Papers (8 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

17 pages, 303 KiB  
Article
Expanding Workplace Inclusion of Employees Who Are Parents of Children with Disabilities through Diversity Training
by Lisa M. Stewart, Julie M. Rosenzweig, Anna M. Malsch Tamarkin, Eileen M. Brennan and Jessica Lukefahr
Healthcare 2022, 10(12), 2361; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10122361 - 24 Nov 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1726
Abstract
Employed parents raising children with disabilities manage exceptional care responsibilities along with their work careers. This study examines the effects of targeted diversity training on human resource (HR) professionals’ knowledge of the work–family experiences of these parents, and on their self-efficacy in providing [...] Read more.
Employed parents raising children with disabilities manage exceptional care responsibilities along with their work careers. This study examines the effects of targeted diversity training on human resource (HR) professionals’ knowledge of the work–family experiences of these parents, and on their self-efficacy in providing workplace supports. Using computer-based training in field settings, 64 U.S. human resource professionals in an international company participated in two diversity training sessions. Data related to knowledge and efficacy of dependent and disability care were collected before the first training and immediately after the second. HR participants demonstrated significant increases from pretest to posttest on the trained items: knowledge of dependent and disability care and self-efficacy regarding provision of workplace supports. There was no change in relevant but untrained variables over time. Training HR professionals on parents’ exceptional care responsibilities, specific community resources, and heightened self-efficacy promoted their likelihood to grant flexible work arrangements. Results suggest HR self-efficacy is developmental, building on prior knowledge of dependent care and tenure in HR positions. This is one of the first studies that address the effects of HR diversity training regarding employees providing exceptional care. Theoretical developments and implications for inclusive practices are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Youth Mental Health and Family Support)
12 pages, 225 KiB  
Article
Black Youths’ Perspectives: Importance of Family and Caregiver Involvement in the Mentor–Mentee Relationship
by Lakindra Mitchell Dove
Healthcare 2022, 10(11), 2181; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10112181 - 31 Oct 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1470
Abstract
Research shows that mentorship can significantly influence the lives of youth. As a society we are becoming more diverse and aware that cultural needs for youth of color are more complex. We have seen an increase in formal mentoring programs that offer services [...] Read more.
Research shows that mentorship can significantly influence the lives of youth. As a society we are becoming more diverse and aware that cultural needs for youth of color are more complex. We have seen an increase in formal mentoring programs that offer services to Black youth. As this shift continues, it is imperative that culturally responsive services are considered. Little research exists that explores the importance of family engagement within the mentor–mentee relationship. When working with Black youth, it is important to understand cultural practices found within the Black family that could have an influence on the mentor–mentee relationship. This study uses qualitative inquiry to explore the perspectives of 12 Black adolescents, ages 14–18, participating in a youth mentoring program. Through individual interviews, the participants described their experiences and observations of their mentor’s engagement with their family/caregiver. Findings suggest that Black youth value a genuine connection between their mentor and family/caregiver, they often assign a familial role to their mentor, and they adhere to cultural practices observed within the Black family. These results have implications for culturally responsive practices for youth mentoring programs to incorporate when working with Black youth and families. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Youth Mental Health and Family Support)
15 pages, 335 KiB  
Article
Somatic, Emotional and Behavioral Symptomatology in Children during COVID-19 Pandemic: The Role of Children’s and Parents’ Alexithymia
by Alessia Renzi, Giulia Conte and Renata Tambelli
Healthcare 2022, 10(11), 2171; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10112171 - 30 Oct 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1442
Abstract
The COVID-19 pandemic has deeply affected the psychophysical wellbeing of children worldwide. Alexithymia, a personality trait involving difficulties in identifying and expressing feelings represents a vulnerability factor for stress-related disorders. Under pandemic stress exposure, we aimed to investigate the role of parents’ and [...] Read more.
The COVID-19 pandemic has deeply affected the psychophysical wellbeing of children worldwide. Alexithymia, a personality trait involving difficulties in identifying and expressing feelings represents a vulnerability factor for stress-related disorders. Under pandemic stress exposure, we aimed to investigate the role of parents’ and children’s alexithymia in the psychophysical symptomatology shown by children and to evaluate possible differences according to age, gender and history of COVID-19 infections. The perception of parents and children about the impact of the pandemic on children’s emotional, social and physiological wellbeing was also explored. Sixty-five familial triads were surveyed in the period from March to May 2022: children (n = 33 males; mean age = 9.53, sd = 1.55), mothers (mean age = 44.12; sd = 6.10) and fathers (mean age = 47.10; sd = 7.8). Both parental and children’s alexithymia scores were significantly associated with somatic and externalizing symptomatology in children. Self-reported anger and externally oriented thinking scores were higher in younger children (age 8–9.9 years) than in older ones (10–12 years). Girls scored higher than boys in somatic complaints, as reported by parents. No difference emerged between children affected/not affected by COVID-19. Notably, children reported a greater negative impact of the pandemic on their emotional and psychosocial well-being than their parents. The findings emphasize the role of alexithymia in the occurrence of psychophysical symptoms in children during the COVID-19 pandemic. The reduced parental awareness of the emotional burden imposed by the pandemic on children indicates the need to better consider how epidemics affect children’s mental health and to develop adequate preventive strategies to support them in these exceptional times. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Youth Mental Health and Family Support)
11 pages, 278 KiB  
Article
Parental Control and College Students’ Adversarial Growth: A Discussion on Chinese One-Child Families
by Ting Nie, Gaoxi Hu and Tengfeng Qiu
Healthcare 2022, 10(10), 1872; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10101872 - 26 Sep 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2283
Abstract
Parental control can affect a children’s attitudes and their ability to cope with adversity after they become adults. This study explored the influence mechanism of parental control on adversity growth and the moderating effect of a growth mindset through a questionnaire survey completed [...] Read more.
Parental control can affect a children’s attitudes and their ability to cope with adversity after they become adults. This study explored the influence mechanism of parental control on adversity growth and the moderating effect of a growth mindset through a questionnaire survey completed by 354 Chinese college students born in one-child families. Hierarchical regression and structural equation analysis results show that parental control negatively affects adversarial growth, and self-identity plays a mediating role between parental control and adversarial growth. A higher degree of parental control will reduce the individual’s self-identity, which is not conducive to the occurrence of adversarial growth. A growth mindset negatively moderates the indirect effect of parental control on adversarial growth through self-identity. Individuals with a strong growth mindset have reduced negative effects of parental control on self-identity and adversarial growth. Even in countries with collectivist cultures, parental controls also need to be implemented carefully, and controlling parenting styles may be detrimental to individual growth after adversity. At the same time, it is necessary to consciously cultivate children’s growth mindsets, so as to inhibit the negative impact of parental control on adversarial growth. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Youth Mental Health and Family Support)
16 pages, 592 KiB  
Article
Peer Academic Supports for Success (PASS) for College Students with Mental Illness: Open Trial
by Maryann Davis, Dori S. Hutchinson, Paul Cherchia, Laura Golden, Emily Morrison and Amanda Baczko
Healthcare 2022, 10(9), 1711; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10091711 - 7 Sep 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1926
Abstract
Increasing numbers of college students have serious mental health conditions, but their dropout rates are high and debt accrual is common. A well-specified intervention that colleges can directly offer their undergraduates with serious mental health conditions that sustains their academic persistence is greatly [...] Read more.
Increasing numbers of college students have serious mental health conditions, but their dropout rates are high and debt accrual is common. A well-specified intervention that colleges can directly offer their undergraduates with serious mental health conditions that sustains their academic persistence is greatly needed. The Peer Academic Supports for Success (PASS) coaching model was developed to address this need. This study’s goal was to conduct an open trial of the initial PASS model to test the feasibility of the model and research methods in preparation for more rigorous testing. Ten college juniors and seniors, with and without lived mental health experience, were hired, trained, and supervised to be PASS peer coaches. Twelve undergraduate students with academically impairing mental health conditions served as study participants and received PASS. Student data were collected at baseline and two semesters post baseline. Intervention feasibility data were assessed through coach report. Results indicate PASS can be delivered with fidelity by peer coaches, can attract and retain students, and is safe. Results also suggest that PASS has significant effects on most of the targeted proximal outcomes. The PASS findings are promising as a college-based intervention to support young adult students with mental health conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Youth Mental Health and Family Support)
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 305 KiB  
Article
Factors Contributing to Employment Status over Time for Caregivers of Young People with Mental Health Disorders
by Ana María Brannan, Eileen M. Brennan, Claudia Sellmaier and Julie M. Rosenzweig
Healthcare 2022, 10(8), 1562; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10081562 - 18 Aug 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1455
Abstract
This study utilized the conservation of resources theory to guide the examination of employment outcomes for caregivers of children with emotional and/or behavioral disorders. The sample included 2455 caregivers whose children received services through federally funded systems of care. Of special interest was [...] Read more.
This study utilized the conservation of resources theory to guide the examination of employment outcomes for caregivers of children with emotional and/or behavioral disorders. The sample included 2455 caregivers whose children received services through federally funded systems of care. Of special interest was whether receiving services and supports predicted change in employment status. We examined change in employment between baseline data collection and the six-month follow-up including: (1) gaining employment, and (2) retaining employment. Findings indicated that the relationship between service/supports and caregiver employment differed depending on initial employment status, and type of service received. Accessing any service was associated with gaining employment. For families who accessed any services, receiving behavioral aide services was associated with gaining employment. Caregivers of children who used residential services were less likely to lose employment. Several child, caregiver, and demographic variables also predicted employment status over time. Taken together, the findings suggest that caregivers of children with emotional and behavioral challenges are at risk for downward cycles of resource loss, and that services and supports have the potential to mitigate that risk. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Youth Mental Health and Family Support)
14 pages, 254 KiB  
Article
Sibling Support Program: A Novel Peer Support Intervention for Parents, Caregivers and Siblings of Youth Experiencing Mental Illness
by Joshua Feriante, Ariella Shayani, Emily Lauer, Adele Pressman and Emily Rubin
Healthcare 2022, 10(5), 908; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10050908 - 13 May 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2309
Abstract
Caregivers and siblings of youth with mental illness often experience role-related psychological challenges, and it is important to focus on the needs of these family members. Existing literature demonstrates that caregivers and affected children benefit from participation in peer support and family-centered programs. [...] Read more.
Caregivers and siblings of youth with mental illness often experience role-related psychological challenges, and it is important to focus on the needs of these family members. Existing literature demonstrates that caregivers and affected children benefit from participation in peer support and family-centered programs. This paper describes the Sibling Support Program: A Family-Centered Mental Health Initiative (SSP), a novel intervention for families of youth with mental illness. The SSP distinguishes itself from existing family-centered programs in that it utilizes a unique combination of peer support, parent mentor guidance, and clinician-led group therapy. The paper details the structure of the treatment model and presents preliminary data from participant surveys. Results show preliminary indications that the program provides both emotional and practical benefits. Along with high satisfaction ratings, family members report decreased feelings of isolation, gains in knowledge, and more positive thinking after program participation. Caregivers report that the SSP helped improve their understanding about the impact of a child’s mental illness on family members, and that they learned about effective family management strategies and access to resources. Siblings report learning coping strategies and feeling better after meeting peers with shared experiences. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Youth Mental Health and Family Support)

Review

Jump to: Research

7 pages, 355 KiB  
Review
Medical–Legal and Psychosocial Considerations on Parental Alienation as a Form of Child Abuse: A Brief Review
by Oana-Maria Isailă and Sorin Hostiuc
Healthcare 2022, 10(6), 1134; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10061134 - 17 Jun 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3008
Abstract
Parental alienation, an entity situated at the limit of psychiatry, sociology, and justice, still represents a controversial concept despite the legal dispositions that take it into account. The scope of this paper is to consider the relationship between parent and child, and child [...] Read more.
Parental alienation, an entity situated at the limit of psychiatry, sociology, and justice, still represents a controversial concept despite the legal dispositions that take it into account. The scope of this paper is to consider the relationship between parent and child, and child abuse from a psychosocial perspective, as well as to depict parental alienation, considered a form of child abuse, without omitting contradictory arguments which are also based on prudence in the minor’s interest, turning the attention to parental estrangement. Although parental alienation is not a psychiatric diagnosis per se and neither is parental estrangement, recognizing the difference between them is vital to adequately manage the situation at the time of establishing custody. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Youth Mental Health and Family Support)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop