Special Issue "Youth Mental Health and Family Support"

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032). This special issue belongs to the section "Community Care".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 September 2022 | Viewed by 3861

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Lisa M. Stewart
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Social Work, California State University Monterey Bay, Monterey, CA 93955, USA
Interests: children’s mental health and family; work and community support; social sustainability
Dr. Claudia Sellmaier
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Social Work & Criminal Justice, University of Washington Tacoma, Tacoma, WA 98402, USA
Interests: resilience and economic security at the intersection of disability and community
Prof. Dr. Eileen Brennan
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Social Work, Portland State University, Portland, OR 97201, USA
Interests: youth mental health; youth peer support; youth and sustainability; transition to adulthood; cultural diversity

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Young people experiencing mental health difficulties often receive treatment and support in their own communities, while living with family members. This Special Issue focuses on innovation in community-based care for young people aged 6–29, and on identifying supportive approaches that foster their success in school, higher education, employment, and social relationships. Of particular interest are services focused on youth aged 14–29 who need support to successfully transition to adulthood. Additionally, papers can examine ways in which families obtain support making it possible for young people to live in their homes or the community while they develop coping skills and successfully integrate into key settings. Particularly welcome are papers focusing on innovative strategies such as peer support for both young people experiencing mental health challenges and their family members. Of considerable interest are ways in which family members manage to care for the young people and engage in employment. We encourage the submission of articles examining social and cultural influences on these processes, and proposing and testing culturally appropriate supports for youth and family. Papers that report original quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods research, reviews of existing research studies, cross-national comparisons, and theoretical examinations of the topic are also welcomed.

Dr. Lisa M. Stewart
Dr. Claudia Sellmaier
Dr. Eileen Brennan
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Community-based mental health services
  • Culturally –appropriate supports
  • School aged youth
  • Transition-aged young people
  • Peer support
  • Family support
  • Social determinants of health

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Sibling Support Program: A Novel Peer Support Intervention for Parents, Caregivers and Siblings of Youth Experiencing Mental Illness
Healthcare 2022, 10(5), 908; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10050908 - 13 May 2022
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Abstract
Caregivers and siblings of youth with mental illness often experience role-related psychological challenges, and it is important to focus on the needs of these family members. Existing literature demonstrates that caregivers and affected children benefit from participation in peer support and family-centered programs. [...] Read more.
Caregivers and siblings of youth with mental illness often experience role-related psychological challenges, and it is important to focus on the needs of these family members. Existing literature demonstrates that caregivers and affected children benefit from participation in peer support and family-centered programs. This paper describes the Sibling Support Program: A Family-Centered Mental Health Initiative (SSP), a novel intervention for families of youth with mental illness. The SSP distinguishes itself from existing family-centered programs in that it utilizes a unique combination of peer support, parent mentor guidance, and clinician-led group therapy. The paper details the structure of the treatment model and presents preliminary data from participant surveys. Results show preliminary indications that the program provides both emotional and practical benefits. Along with high satisfaction ratings, family members report decreased feelings of isolation, gains in knowledge, and more positive thinking after program participation. Caregivers report that the SSP helped improve their understanding about the impact of a child’s mental illness on family members, and that they learned about effective family management strategies and access to resources. Siblings report learning coping strategies and feeling better after meeting peers with shared experiences. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Youth Mental Health and Family Support)

Review

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Review
Medical–Legal and Psychosocial Considerations on Parental Alienation as a Form of Child Abuse: A Brief Review
Healthcare 2022, 10(6), 1134; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10061134 - 17 Jun 2022
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Abstract
Parental alienation, an entity situated at the limit of psychiatry, sociology, and justice, still represents a controversial concept despite the legal dispositions that take it into account. The scope of this paper is to consider the relationship between parent and child, and child [...] Read more.
Parental alienation, an entity situated at the limit of psychiatry, sociology, and justice, still represents a controversial concept despite the legal dispositions that take it into account. The scope of this paper is to consider the relationship between parent and child, and child abuse from a psychosocial perspective, as well as to depict parental alienation, considered a form of child abuse, without omitting contradictory arguments which are also based on prudence in the minor’s interest, turning the attention to parental estrangement. Although parental alienation is not a psychiatric diagnosis per se and neither is parental estrangement, recognizing the difference between them is vital to adequately manage the situation at the time of establishing custody. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Youth Mental Health and Family Support)
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