Chronic Pain and the Aging Population

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 December 2018) | Viewed by 16202

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Psychology, College of Science, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019, USA
Interests: pain management; biopsychosocial research; clinical health psychology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleauges,

As noted by Piotrowski (2014): "... the study of chronic pain in the elderly has developed into a sub-specialty" (p. 16). Indeed, with the rapidly aging population, more clinical research is essential to develop a better understanding of various issues in this population, such as the most effective pain management interventions, physical and mental health comorbidities, pain medication use (especially the use of opioids), etc. As a result, this Special Series will include the most updated articles addressing such issues.

Reference:

Piotrowski, C. Chronic Pain and the Elderly: Mapping the Mental Health Literature. Journal of Instructional Psychology 2014, 41(1), 16–18.

Prof. Dr. Robert Gatchel
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • chronic pain
  • the aging population
  • pain interventions
  • comorbid conditions
  • pain medications

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 263 KiB  
Article
Orthopedic Professionals’ Recognition and Knowledge of Pain and Perceived Barriers to Optimal Pain Management at Five Hospitals
by Fadi Bouri, Walid El Ansari, Shady Mahmoud, Ahmed Elhessy, Abdulla Al-Ansari and Mohamed Al Ateeq Al-Dosari
Healthcare 2018, 6(3), 98; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare6030098 - 13 Aug 2018
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 4753
Abstract
Pain is a challenge for orthopedic healthcare professionals (OHCP). However, pain studies examined the competencies of a single OHCP category, did not consider various pain management domains or barriers to optimal pain service, and are deficient across the Arabic Eastern Mediterranean region. We [...] Read more.
Pain is a challenge for orthopedic healthcare professionals (OHCP). However, pain studies examined the competencies of a single OHCP category, did not consider various pain management domains or barriers to optimal pain service, and are deficient across the Arabic Eastern Mediterranean region. We surveyed OHCP’s recognition and knowledge of pain and perceived barriers to optimal pain service (361 OHCP, five hospitals). Chi square compared doctors’ (n = 63) vs. nurses/physiotherapists’ (n = 187) views. In terms of pain recognition, more nurses had pain management training, confidently assessed pediatric/elderly pain, were aware of their departments’ pain protocols, and felt that their patients receive proper pain management. More doctors comfortably prescribed opiate medications and agreed that some nationalities were more sensitive to pain. For pain knowledge, more nurses felt patients are accurate in assessing their pain, vital signs are accurate in assessing children’s pain, children feel less pain because of nervous system immaturity, narcotics are not preferred due respiratory depression, and knew pre-emptive analgesia. As for barriers to optimal pain service, less nurses agreed about the lack of local policies/guidelines, knowledge, and skills; time to pre-medicate patients; knowledge about medications; complexity of the clinical environment; and physicians being not comfortable prescribing pain medication. We conclude that doctors required confidence in pain, especially pediatric and geriatric pain, using vital signs in assessing pain and narcotics use. Their most perceived barriers were lack of local policies/guidelines and skills. Nurses required more confidence in medications, caring for patients on narcotics, expressed fewer barriers than doctors, and the complexity of the clinical environment was their highest barrier. Educational programs with clinical application could improve OHCPs’ pain competencies/clinical practices in pain assessment and administration of analgesics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chronic Pain and the Aging Population)
12 pages, 899 KiB  
Article
Pain and Pain Medication among Older People with Intellectual Disabilities in Comparison with the General Population
by Anna Axmon, Gerd Ahlström and Hans Westergren
Healthcare 2018, 6(2), 67; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare6020067 - 15 Jun 2018
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 4439
Abstract
Little is known about pain and pain treatment among people with intellectual disabilities (IDs). We aimed to describe pain and pain medications among older people with ID compared to the general population. Data on diagnoses and prescriptions were collected from national registers for [...] Read more.
Little is known about pain and pain treatment among people with intellectual disabilities (IDs). We aimed to describe pain and pain medications among older people with ID compared to the general population. Data on diagnoses and prescriptions were collected from national registers for the period between 2006 and 2012 for 7936 people with an ID and a referent cohort from the general population. IDs were associated with a decreased risk of being diagnosed with headaches, musculoskeletal pain, and pain related to the circulatory and respiratory systems, but they were associated with increased risk of being diagnosed with pain related to the urinary system. Among men, IDs were associated with an increased risk of being diagnosed with visceral pain. People with IDs were more likely to be prescribed paracetamol and fentanyl regardless of the type of pain but were less likely to be prescribed COX(1+2) and COX2 inhibitors and weak opioids. Healthcare staff and caregivers must be made aware of signs of pain among people with IDs who may not be able to communicate it themselves. Further research is needed to investigate whether people with IDs are prescribed paracetamol rather than other pain drugs due to physicians trying to avoid polypharmacy or if there are other reasons not to prescribe a greater range of pain treatments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chronic Pain and the Aging Population)
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12 pages, 361 KiB  
Article
Transitioning from Acute to Chronic Pain: An Examination of Different Trajectories of Low-Back Pain
by Robert J. Gatchel, Kelley Bevers, John C. Licciardone, Jianzhong Su, Ying Du and Marco Brotto
Healthcare 2018, 6(2), 48; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare6020048 - 17 May 2018
Cited by 25 | Viewed by 6518
Abstract
Traditionally, there has been a widely accepted notion that the transition from acute to chronic pain follows a linear trajectory, where an injury leads to acute episodes, subacute stages, and progresses to a chronic pain condition. However, it appears that pain progression is [...] Read more.
Traditionally, there has been a widely accepted notion that the transition from acute to chronic pain follows a linear trajectory, where an injury leads to acute episodes, subacute stages, and progresses to a chronic pain condition. However, it appears that pain progression is much more complicated and individualized than this original unsupported assumption. It is now becoming apparent that, while this linear progression may occur, it is not the only path that pain, specifically low-back pain, follows. It is clear there is a definite need to evaluate how low-back pain trajectories are classified and, subsequently, how we can more effectively intervene during these progression stages. In order to better understand and manage pain conditions, we must examine the different pain trajectories, and develop a standard by which to use these classifications, so that clinicians can better identify and predict patient-needs and customize treatments for maximum efficacy. The present article examines the most recent trajectory research, and highlights the importance of developing a broader model for patient evaluation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chronic Pain and the Aging Population)
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