Next Article in Journal
Thoracic Outlet Syndrome: Biomechanical and Exercise Considerations
Next Article in Special Issue
Orthopedic Professionals’ Recognition and Knowledge of Pain and Perceived Barriers to Optimal Pain Management at Five Hospitals
Previous Article in Journal
A Health System’s Journey toward Better Population Health through Empanelment and Panel Management
Previous Article in Special Issue
Transitioning from Acute to Chronic Pain: An Examination of Different Trajectories of Low-Back Pain
Article Menu
Issue 2 (June) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Healthcare 2018, 6(2), 67; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare6020067

Pain and Pain Medication among Older People with Intellectual Disabilities in Comparison with the General Population

1
Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden
2
Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden
3
Department of Pain rehabilitation, Skane University hospital, 222 85 Lund, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 23 May 2018 / Revised: 11 June 2018 / Accepted: 12 June 2018 / Published: 15 June 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chronic Pain and the Aging Population)
Full-Text   |   PDF [899 KB, uploaded 15 June 2018]   |  

Abstract

Little is known about pain and pain treatment among people with intellectual disabilities (IDs). We aimed to describe pain and pain medications among older people with ID compared to the general population. Data on diagnoses and prescriptions were collected from national registers for the period between 2006 and 2012 for 7936 people with an ID and a referent cohort from the general population. IDs were associated with a decreased risk of being diagnosed with headaches, musculoskeletal pain, and pain related to the circulatory and respiratory systems, but they were associated with increased risk of being diagnosed with pain related to the urinary system. Among men, IDs were associated with an increased risk of being diagnosed with visceral pain. People with IDs were more likely to be prescribed paracetamol and fentanyl regardless of the type of pain but were less likely to be prescribed COX(1+2) and COX2 inhibitors and weak opioids. Healthcare staff and caregivers must be made aware of signs of pain among people with IDs who may not be able to communicate it themselves. Further research is needed to investigate whether people with IDs are prescribed paracetamol rather than other pain drugs due to physicians trying to avoid polypharmacy or if there are other reasons not to prescribe a greater range of pain treatments. View Full-Text
Keywords: cognitive dysfunction; fentanyl; headache; musculoskeletal pain; paracetamol; visceral pain cognitive dysfunction; fentanyl; headache; musculoskeletal pain; paracetamol; visceral pain
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Axmon, A.; Ahlström, G.; Westergren, H. Pain and Pain Medication among Older People with Intellectual Disabilities in Comparison with the General Population. Healthcare 2018, 6, 67.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Healthcare EISSN 2227-9032 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top