Special Issue "Palliative Care in Kidney Disease"

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032). This special issue belongs to the section "Nursing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Joanne Reid
Website
Guest Editor
School of Nursing and Midwifery, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast BT9 7BL, UK
Interests: cancer; palliative care; patient and lay carer experience; mixed methods research; renal; cachexia
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Clare McKeaveney
Website
Guest Editor
School of Nursing and Midwifery, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast BT9 7BL, UK
Interests: Renal disease; cachexia; quality of life; palliative care; conservative management
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This special issue of Healthcare will focus on palliative care in kidney disease. Patients with renal disease live with a serious chronic illness and can present with a range of conditions highlighting the multifaceted nature of this patient population. Patients with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) experience significant morbidity and mortality issues, yet are less likely to receive palliative care services compared to other diseases. Renal management at any stage of the disease involves an intensive routine of clinical care however living with renal disease requires significant self-management and care. It is strongly advocated that ESKD requires an interdisciplinary palliative care approach starting at the point of diagnosis and continuing throughout the patient’s life. In such cases, palliative care presumes a holistic comprehensive supportive role addressing the physical, psychosocial, spiritual and existential needs of patients and their families. This includes end of life issues for patients, as well as families having the appropriate bereavement support. However, clinicians working in nephrology have called for more training in aspects of palliative care in ESKD.

We will feature original research and include interesting clinical studies, reviews, short reports, narratives and opinion pieces from researchers interested in this research topic. We welcome papers focused on: (1) the role of supportive and palliative care in kidney disease for both patients, carers and/or healthcare staff; (2) provide specific learning points for multidisciplinary HCPs working in renal healthcare where palliative care is provided; (3) advocate for an interdisciplinary palliative care approach for patients and families; (4) highlight the need for continued appropriate and integrated psychosocial care for people living with kidney disease.

Prof. Dr. Joanne Reid
Dr. Clare McKeaveney
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Healthcare
  • Supportive and Palliative Care
  • Kidney Disease

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Factors Influencing Self-Efficacy and Self-Management among Patients with Pre-End-Stage Renal Disease (Pre-ESRD)
Healthcare 2021, 9(3), 266; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9030266 - 02 Mar 2021
Abstract
Aim: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an emerging major public health issue that leads to end-stage kidney disease (ESRD). Factors influencing the self-management and self-efficacy of ESRD patients are still under investigation. The objective of this study is to evaluate the association of [...] Read more.
Aim: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an emerging major public health issue that leads to end-stage kidney disease (ESRD). Factors influencing the self-management and self-efficacy of ESRD patients are still under investigation. The objective of this study is to evaluate the association of depression and anxiety with self-management and self-efficacy in patients with pre-ESRD. Methods: Patients in the department of nephrology of a regional hospital in Taiwan were invited to participate and were included in our study if they had a confirmed diagnosis of early-stage CKD, were more than 20 years old, and could converse in Mandarin Chinese or Taiwanese. Patients diagnosed with depression, who could not execute self-care, or who had cognitive deficits were excluded. In total, this cross-sectional study included 112 pre-ESRD patients. We used the Chinese versions of the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS), the chronic kidney disease self-efficacy instrument (CKD-SE), and the chronic kidney disease self-management instrument (CKD-SM) as the questionnaire. Spearman’s rank correlation and logistic regressions were used to analyze the data. Results: The top quartile of self-management and self-efficacy scores (28 patients) was defined as high self-management and -efficacy, respectively, and the lower three quartiles as low self-management and -efficacy. The logistic regression analysis showed that having depression decreased the odds of having high self-management by 75.4% and high self-efficacy by 75.1%. Having an education level of senior high school or above increased the odds ratios for having high self-management and high self-efficacy to 4.47 and 3.56 (all p-values < 0.05). Conclusion: Controlling depression as well as increasing the level of education can potentially increase self-management and self-efficacy in pre-ESRD patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Palliative Care in Kidney Disease)
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