Special Issue "Mental Health Related to Traumatic and Adverse Experiences"

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Factors and Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 June 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Connie Veazey
Website
Guest Editor
Clinical Psychology, Fielding Graduate University, Houston, TX, USA
Interests: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy; Trauma Recovery; Posttraumatic Stress Disorder; Health Psychology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

There is a wealth of interest and work in the field of trauma recovery. Typically, trauma recovery has focused on researching and understanding the nature of Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). However, more recently, the global community is experiencing events which do not fit neatly into the criteria used to define a trauma which would qualify a person for the diagnosis of PTSD according to established medical diagnostic nomenclature (i.e., DSM, ICD). There is growing recognition that events, which we can term “adverse” (e.g., unemployment, chronic medical illnesses, extreme weather events), require a broadening of the standard diagnostic nomenclature to capture their impact on the mental and physical health of individuals.

The field of trauma recovery is broad and includes researchers and health professionals from across a variety of academic and medical disciplines. It is worthwhile to examine adverse events from a multidisciplinary perspective, which can help capture the true impact of such events on people. There is growing focus on outcomes such as sleep disturbance, chronic pain, spiritual impact, community impact, work performance, to name a few. Such a wholistic perspective also informs recovery, in terms of guiding treating professionals in interventions leading to multiple pathways to recovery.

This special issue of Healthcare, entitled “Mental and Physical Health Related to Traumatic and Adverse Experiences”, has the ambitious goal of garnering research and review papers from scholars from across medical and academic disciplines with the hope of identifying work that will contribute to the recognition and recovery of people experiencing traumatic and adverse experiences. Multidisciplinary research projects are especially encouraged. Papers focusing on both Criterion A traumatic events, using traditional diagnostic nomenclature (i.e., PTSD), and those focusing on adverse events, which are typically not considered as Criterion A, but nonetheless lead to similar stress-related outcomes, are welcomed. In addition, papers focusing on recovery, including identification of mental, physical, and alternative health interventions for such traumatic and adverse events will be considered.

Dr. Connie Veazey

Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Trauma Recovery
  • Traumatic Events
  • PTSD
  • Adverse Events

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
The Glucocorticoid Receptor Gene (NR3C1) 9β SNP Is Associated with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder
Healthcare 2021, 9(2), 173; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9020173 - 05 Feb 2021
Viewed by 340
Abstract
Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been associated with glucocorticoid (GC) hypersensitivity. Although genetic factors account for 30–46% of the variance in PTSD, no associations have been found between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the GC receptor (GR) gene (NR3C1) and risk [...] Read more.
Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been associated with glucocorticoid (GC) hypersensitivity. Although genetic factors account for 30–46% of the variance in PTSD, no associations have been found between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the GC receptor (GR) gene (NR3C1) and risk for this disorder. We studied the association of five SNPs in the GR gene (rs10052957, rs6189/rs6190, rs6195, rs41423247, and rs6198) and haplotypes with PTSD, in a group of Portuguese male war veterans (33 with lifetime PTSD, 28 without). To determine whether the 9β SNP (rs6198) was associated with chronically altered cortisol levels, we evaluated hair cortisol concentrations (HCC) in a sample of 69 veterans’ offspring. The 9β variant (G allele) was significantly associated with lifetime PTSD under a dominant model of inheritance. The 9β variant was also significantly associated with severity of current PTSD symptoms. The haplotype analysis revealed an association between a common haplotype comprising the 9β risk allele and lifetime PTSD. Carriers of the 9β risk allele had significantly lower HCC than non-carriers. We found the 9β risk allele and a haplotype comprising the 9β risk allele of the GR gene to be associated with PTSD in veterans. This 9β risk allele was also associated with lower HCC in their offspring. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Health Related to Traumatic and Adverse Experiences)
Open AccessArticle
Incidence of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder after Coronavirus Disease
Healthcare 2020, 8(4), 373; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8040373 - 30 Sep 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1056
Abstract
Background: The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) emerged from China and rapidly spread to many other countries. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among patients with COVID-19 who were treated and discharged from a university hospital in Daegu, [...] Read more.
Background: The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) emerged from China and rapidly spread to many other countries. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among patients with COVID-19 who were treated and discharged from a university hospital in Daegu, Korea. Methods: In total, 64 patients who were diagnosed with COVID-19 and then hospitalized, treated and discharged from the university hospital between February and April 2020 participated in our study. We conducted telephone interviews with the participants and evaluated the presence of PTSD using the Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist-5 (PCL-5) based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5; score range: 0–80). If a score of ≥33 was obtained, then a diagnosis of PTSD was made. We analyzed the association between PTSD and demographic and clinical characteristics using the Mann–Whitney U and chi-square tests. Results: In total, 13 patients had a PCL-5 score of ≥33, which indicated that 20.3% (n = 64) of the patients had PTSD. No significant differences were observed in demographic characteristics, including, sex, age, hospitalization time and duration after discharge, between patients with PTSD and those without PTSD. Conclusions: The prevalence rate of PTSD was 20.3% in patients with COVID-19 who had been hospitalized, treated and discharged. Accordingly, clinicians should be aware of the high possibility of PTSD among COVID-19 patients. Mental health interventions supporting the mental health of patients should be provided to affected patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Health Related to Traumatic and Adverse Experiences)
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