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Special Issue "Lung Involvement in COVID-19: Short and Long-Term Impact and Management"

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032). This special issue belongs to the section "Coronaviruses (CoV) and COVID-19 Pandemic".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2022) | Viewed by 1568

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Diana C. Sanchez-Ramirez
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3E 0T6, Canada
Interests: epidemiology; health services research; pulmonary (tele)rehabilitation; chronic respiratory diseases; post COVID-19 syndrome

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) began to spread rapidly worldwide in December 2019, reaching pandemic level in March 2020. Although most of those infected experience mild to moderate symptoms, a considerable number of cases develop severe pneumonia and respiratory failure. Growing evidence suggests that even in cases that did not require hospitalization, COVID-19 survivors may experience lung changes, as well as short- and long-term respiratory effects such as decreased lung capacity and breathlessness.  

This Special Issue of Healthcare seeks to explore various aspects related to the lungs’ involvement in COVID-19. We welcome original epidemiology or clinical research, short reports, and reviews leading to the advancement of knowledge of the impact of COVID-19 on lung health, as well as potentially effective management interventions at different stages of infection.

Dr. Diana C. Sanchez-Ramirez
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • COVID-19
  • post COVID-19 syndrome
  • epidemiology
  • pneumonia
  • inflammation
  • mechanical ventilation
  • oxygen use
  • lung fibrosis
  • healthcare use
  • pulmonary function
  • dyspnea
  • disability
  • rehabilitation

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Abnormal Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Levels and Other Risk Factors Associated with Lung Function Impairment at 6 and 12 Months after Hospitalization Due to COVID-19: A Cohort Study
Healthcare 2022, 10(12), 2341; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10122341 - 22 Nov 2022
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Abstract
Respiratory function deficits are common sequelae for COVID-19. In this study, we aimed to identify the medical conditions that may influence lung function impairment at 12 months after SARS-CoV2 infection and to analyze the role of alpha-1 antytripsin (AAT) deficiciency (AATD). A cohort [...] Read more.
Respiratory function deficits are common sequelae for COVID-19. In this study, we aimed to identify the medical conditions that may influence lung function impairment at 12 months after SARS-CoV2 infection and to analyze the role of alpha-1 antytripsin (AAT) deficiciency (AATD). A cohort study was conducted on hospitalized COVID-19 pneumonia patients in Granada (Spain) during the first infection wave who were referred to a post-COVID-19 hospital clinic. The patients were monitored with three follow-up visits from May 2020 to May 2021. Previous medical history, hospital admission data, baseline parameters and physical examination data were collected at the first visit. Pulmonary function tests were performed at 6 and 12 months together with the determination of AAT level and AATD genotype. After 12 months, 49 out of 157 patients (31.2%) continued to have lung function impairment. A multivariate analysis showed a statistically significant association of lung function impairment with: higher Charlson index; pneumonia with a central and/or mixed distribution; anemia on admission; time in intensive care; need for corticosteroid boluses; abnormal respiratory sounds at 6 months; elevated lactate dehydrogenase at 12 months; abnormal AAT; and MZ genotype. Our results suggest that these medical conditions predispose COVID-19 patients to develop long-term lung function sequelae. Full article
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Review

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Review
A Systematic Review and Quality Evaluation of Studies on Long-Term Sequelae of COVID-19
Healthcare 2022, 10(12), 2364; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10122364 - 24 Nov 2022
Viewed by 447
Abstract
COVID-19 made its debut as a pandemic in 2020; since then, more than 607 million cases and at least 6.5 million deaths have been reported worldwide. While the burden of disease has been described, the long-term effects or chronic sequelae are still being [...] Read more.
COVID-19 made its debut as a pandemic in 2020; since then, more than 607 million cases and at least 6.5 million deaths have been reported worldwide. While the burden of disease has been described, the long-term effects or chronic sequelae are still being clarified. The aim of this study was to present an overview of the information available on the sequelae of COVID-19 in people who have suffered from the infection. A systematic review was carried out in which cohort studies, case series, and clinical case reports were included, and the PubMed, Scielo, SCOPUS, and Web of Science databases were extracted. Information was published from 2020 to 1 June 2022, and we included 26 manuscripts: 9 for pulmonary, 6 for cardiac, 2 for renal, 8 for neurological and psychiatric, and 6 for cutaneous sequelae. Studies showed that the most common sequelae were those linked to the lungs, followed by skin, cutaneous, and psychiatric alterations. Women reported a higher incidence of the sequelae, as well as those with comorbidities and more severe COVID-19 history. The COVID-19 pandemic has not only caused death and disease since its appearance, but it has also sickened millions of people around the globe who potentially suffer from serious illnesses that will continue to add to the list of health problems, and further burden healthcare systems around the world. Full article
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Other

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Systematic Review
Effectiveness of Pulmonary Rehabilitation among COVID-19 Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Healthcare 2022, 10(11), 2130; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10112130 - 26 Oct 2022
Viewed by 656
Abstract
Background: Many COVID-19 patients presented with detrimental features, such as impaired respiratory function, physical capacity, and overall poor quality of life. The present study evaluates the effectiveness of pulmonary rehabilitation on COVID-19 patients. Methods: We searched PubMed, Scopus, ScienceDirect, and Google Scholar from [...] Read more.
Background: Many COVID-19 patients presented with detrimental features, such as impaired respiratory function, physical capacity, and overall poor quality of life. The present study evaluates the effectiveness of pulmonary rehabilitation on COVID-19 patients. Methods: We searched PubMed, Scopus, ScienceDirect, and Google Scholar from 2019 to 2021. The protocol was registered in PROSPERO with the registration number CRD42021273618. We performed statistical analyses via random effects and expressed the outcomes as standardized mean difference (SMD) for continuous variables, with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: We included six trials involving 432 patients. The primary outcome showed a significant improvement in physical function (SMD 0.83, 95% CI −0.58 to 1.09; p < 0.001; four trials, 266 participants; high-quality evidence). There was significant difference in anxiety (SMD −0.80, 95% CI −1.23 to −0.37; p = 0.003), physical activity intensity levels (SMD −1.27, 95% CI −2.23 to −0.32; p = 0.009), sleep quality (MD −0.05, 95% CI −0.83 to −0.16; p = 0.004), peripheral muscle performance of lower limbs (SMD 0.90, 95% CI −0.60 to 1.20; p < 0.001), and dyspnoea outcomes (SMD −0.55, 95% CI −0.87 to −0.23; p = 0.007). Conclusions: Pulmonary rehabilitation is an effective adjuvant therapy that minimizes COVID-19 severity in the intervention group compared to the conventional treatment. The findings of this study will need to be considered in the framework of the clinical outcome as observed in the intervention outcome. Additionally, safer data on guideline rehabilitation would be needed to examine whether pulmonary rehabilitation would be a fruitful intervention to reduce COVID-19 severity. Full article
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