Special Issue "Advances in Computational Geomechanics"

A special issue of Geosciences (ISSN 2076-3263).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2018).

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Chin Leo

School of Computing, Engineering & Math, Western Sydney University, Sydney, NSW 1797, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: computational geomechanics; soft soils; poromechanics; site characterization; geomaterial characterisation
Guest Editor
Prof. Kwai Kwan (Henry) Wong

DR CNRS, LTDS UMR 5513, LGCB, ENTPE, Université de Lyon, 2 rue Maurice Audin, 69100 Vaulx-en-Velin, France
Website | E-Mail
Interests: underground storage of nuclear wastes and CO2, soils from relatively dry state to quasi-saturated with occluded air bubbles, rammed earthen constructions, tunnel excavation with face confinement
Guest Editor
Prof. Yung-ming Cheng

Associate Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, 11 Yuk Choi Rd, Hung Hom, Hong Kong, China
Website | E-Mail
Interests: numerical methods, discrete element analysis, slope and pile, deep excavation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Computations in geomechanics have evolved rapidly, and this Special Issue, “Advances in Computational Geomechanics”, aims to capture some of the recent developments.

There is no doubt that the advent of the digital computer, and more recently the Internet and artificial intelligence, have led to a proliferation of interesting and innovative computational concepts, methods, algorithms and applications related to the solving of problems dealing with the mechanics of geomaterials, namely, soils, rocks, grains and snow.

We invite contributions from researchers and practitioners for this Special Issue in the form of high quality original research articles, reviews and technical notes based on their recent work on computational geomechanicss.

Topics of interest appropriate for this issue include constitutive modelling, limit analysis, multi-scale modelling, numerical modelling, fracture mechanics, artificial intelligence, stochastic methods, plasticity, analytical and semi-analytical methods, back analysis, optimisation, and failure analysis as applied to problems in geomechanics.

If in doubt, it is recommended that authors should contact one of the Guest Editors to seek clarification on the appropriateness of their potential contributions. It would be useful in this case to include a short abstract briefly outlining the objectives of the research and the key results obtained. Finally, the full manuscript is required to be submitted by the closing date of 30 November 2018.

Prof. Chin Leo
Prof. Kwai Kwan (Henry) Wong
Prof. Yung-ming Cheng
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Geosciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • constitutive modelling
  • limit analysis
  • multi-scale modelling
  • numerical modelling
  • fracture mechanics
  • artificial intelligence
  • stochastic methods
  • plasticity
  • analytical and semi-analytical methods
  • back analysis
  • optimization
  • failure analysis

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
On Contraction of Three-Dimensional Multiple Shear Mechanism Model for Evaluation of Large Scale Liquefaction Using High Performance Computing
Geosciences 2019, 9(1), 38; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences9010038
Received: 29 November 2018 / Revised: 19 December 2018 / Accepted: 8 January 2019 / Published: 12 January 2019
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Abstract
For more reliable evaluation of liquefaction, an analysis model of higher fidelity should be used even though it requires more numerical computation. We developed a parallel finite element method (FEM), implemented with the non-linear multiple shear mechanism model. A bottleneck experienced when implementing [...] Read more.
For more reliable evaluation of liquefaction, an analysis model of higher fidelity should be used even though it requires more numerical computation. We developed a parallel finite element method (FEM), implemented with the non-linear multiple shear mechanism model. A bottleneck experienced when implementing the model is the use of vast amounts of CPU memory for material state parameters. We succeeded in drastically reducing the computation requirements of the model by suitably approximating the formulation of the model. An analysis model of high fidelity was constructed for a soil-structure system, and the model was analyzed by using the developed parallel FEM on a parallel computer. The amount of required CPU memory was reduced. The computation time was reduced as well, and the practical applicability of the developed parallel FEM is demonstrated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Computational Geomechanics)
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Open AccessArticle
Use of Geogrids and Recycled Rubber in Railroad Infrastructure for Enhanced Performance
Geosciences 2019, 9(1), 30; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences9010030
Received: 21 November 2018 / Revised: 17 December 2018 / Accepted: 28 December 2018 / Published: 8 January 2019
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Abstract
Railway tracks are conventionally built on compacted ballast and structural fill layers placed above the natural (subgrade) foundation. However, during train operations, track deteriorations occur progressively due to ballast degradation. The associated track deformation is usually accompanied by a reduction in both load [...] Read more.
Railway tracks are conventionally built on compacted ballast and structural fill layers placed above the natural (subgrade) foundation. However, during train operations, track deteriorations occur progressively due to ballast degradation. The associated track deformation is usually accompanied by a reduction in both load bearing capacity and drainage, apart from imposing frequent track maintenance. Suitable ground improvement techniques involving plastic inclusions (e.g., geogrids) and energy absorbing materials (e.g., rubber products) to enhance the stability and longevity of tracks have become increasingly popular. This paper presents the outcomes from innovative research and development measures into the use of plastic and rubber elements in rail tracks undertaken at the University of Wollongong, Australia, over the past twenty years. The results obtained from laboratory tests, mathematical modelling and numerical modelling reveal that track performance can be improved significantly by using geogrid and energy absorbing rubber products (e.g., rubber crumbs, waste tire-cell and rubber mats). Test results show that the addition of rubber materials can efficiently improve the energy absorption of the structural layer and also reduce ballast breakage. Furthermore, by incorporating the work input parameters, the energy absorbing property of the newly developed synthetic capping layer is captured by correct modelling of dilatancy. In addition, the laboratory behavior of tire cells and geogrids has been validated by numerical modelling (i.e., Finite Element Modelling-FEM, Discrete Element—DEM), and a coupled DEM-FEM modelling approach is also introduced to simulate ballast deformation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Computational Geomechanics)
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Open AccessArticle
Hybrid Fixed-Point Fixed-Stress Splitting Method for Linear Poroelasticity
Geosciences 2019, 9(1), 29; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences9010029
Received: 8 November 2018 / Revised: 28 December 2018 / Accepted: 2 January 2019 / Published: 8 January 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2798 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Efficient and accurate poroelasticity models are critical in modeling geophysical problems such as oil exploration, gas-hydrate detection, and hydrogeology. We propose an efficient operator splitting method for Biot’s model of linear poroelasticity based on fixed-point iteration and constrained stress. In this method, we [...] Read more.
Efficient and accurate poroelasticity models are critical in modeling geophysical problems such as oil exploration, gas-hydrate detection, and hydrogeology. We propose an efficient operator splitting method for Biot’s model of linear poroelasticity based on fixed-point iteration and constrained stress. In this method, we eliminate the constraint on time step via combining our fixed-point approach with a physics-based restraint between iterations. Three different cases are considered to demonstrate the stability and consistency of the method for constant and variable parameters. The results are validated against the results from the fully coupled approach. In case I, a single iteration is used for continuous coefficients. The relative error decreases with an increase in time. In case II, material coefficients are assumed to be linear. In the single iteration approach, the relative error grows significantly to 40% before rapidly decaying to zero. This is an artifact of the approximate solutions approaching the asymptotic solution. The error in the multiple iterations oscillates within 10 6 before decaying to the asymptotic solution. Nine iterations per time step are enough to achieve the relative error close to 10 7 . In the last case, the hybrid method with multiple iterations requires approximately 16 iterations to make the relative error 5 × 10 6 . Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Computational Geomechanics)
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Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Simulations of Fine-Meshed Biaxial Tests with Barodesy
Geosciences 2019, 9(1), 20; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences9010020
Received: 28 November 2018 / Revised: 19 December 2018 / Accepted: 25 December 2018 / Published: 29 December 2018
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Abstract
Recent experimental studies showed that shear band development starts at the beginning of triaxial tests. In experimental testing, it is impossible to obtain a soil sample with a homogeneous void ratio. Therefore, a homogeneous deformation, i.e., an element test, is questionable well before [...] Read more.
Recent experimental studies showed that shear band development starts at the beginning of triaxial tests. In experimental testing, it is impossible to obtain a soil sample with a homogeneous void ratio. Therefore, a homogeneous deformation, i.e., an element test, is questionable well before the peak. In this article we carry out finite element simulations of fine-meshed biaxial tests with the constitutive model barodesy, where the stress rate is formulated as a function of stress, stretching and void ratio. The initial void ratio in the simulations is normally distributed over all elements in a narrow range. In this article, we evaluate the pre-peak shear band development. We further compare stress paths and stress-strain curves of the biaxial test of relevant elements (e.g., in- and outside the shear band) with the results of the average response of all elements. We show how the response in an element test differs from the average response of the fine-meshed test. We present the resulting potential for understanding (early) shear band development and stress-strain behaviour in a biaxial test: The inhomogeneous void ratio distribution in a sample favours early shear band development. This effect is modelled with barodesy. The obtained stress paths and stress-strain curves show that the maximum deviatoric stress is higher in the element test than it is in the average response of the fine-meshed test. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Computational Geomechanics)
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Graphical abstract

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