Special Issue "Characterization and Simulation of Carbonate Reservoirs"

A special issue of Geosciences (ISSN 2076-3263).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (23 August 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. François Fournier
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centre Européen de Recherche et d’Enseignement des Géosciences de l’Environnement, Aix-Marseille Université, 13331 Marseille Cedex 03, France
Interests: carbonate sedimentology; diagenesis and petroacoustics
Prof. Dr. Jean Borgomano
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centre Européen de Recherche et d’Enseignement des Géosciences de l’Environnement, Aix-Marseille Université, 13331 Marseille Cedex 03, France
Interests: exploration geology; petroleum geology
Dr. Philippe Léonide
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centre Européen de Recherche et d’Enseignement des Géosciences de l’Environnement, Aix-Marseille Université, 13331 Marseille Cedex 03, France
Interests: field geology; petroleum geology; reservoir engineering

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Understanding the mechanism of fluid flow within subsurface carbonate reservoirs has become a major challenge for many engineering processes such as oil and gas extraction, the assessment and production of water resources, and geothermal fluids and the geological sequestration of CO2. Carbonate reservoirs are commonly characterized by considerable and multi-scale heterogeneity, ranging from the micron-scale to the regional scale, due to the complex interaction between geodynamic, climatic, paleoceanographic, diagenetic and biological parameters.

This Special Issue aims to publish innovative studies that include methods for characterizing the three-dimensional depositional, diagenetic, and reservoir architecture of carbonate systems and reservoirs and methods for simulating fluid flows in such heterogeneous media. Special attention will be paid to integrative studies coupling naturalistic (biosedimentology, diagenesis, structural geology) and quantitative (rock physics, quantitative seismics, flow simulation) approaches, based on outcrop and/or subsurface examples. The areas of major interest for this Special Issue include, but are not limited to:

  • sedimentological and diagenetic controls on carbonate reservoir architecture,
  • carbonate rock physics,
  • quantitative seismic characterization of carbonate reservoirs,
  • numerical modelling of static and dynamic properties of carbonate reservoirs,
  • fluid flow simulation in carbonate reservoirs.

We especially welcome submissions related to the keywords presented at the bottom of this page. Authors are invited to send to the Guest Editors a title, list of authors and abstract of the manuscript they would like to submit to this Special Issue.

Dr. François Fournier
Prof. Dr. Jean Borgomano
Dr. Philippe Léonide
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Geosciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • carbonates
  • sedimentology
  • diagenesis
  • stratigraphy
  • rock physics
  • acoustic properties
  • seismic
  • reservoir properties
  • porosity
  • permeability
  • flow simulation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Nano- to Millimeter Scale Morphology of Connected and Isolated Porosity in the Permo-Triassic Khuff Formation of Oman
Geosciences 2020, 10(1), 7; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences10010007 - 23 Dec 2019
Abstract
Carbonate reservoirs form important exploration targets for the oil and gas industry in many parts of the world. This study aims to differentiate and quantify pore types and their relation to petrophysical properties in the Permo-Triassic Khuff Formation, a major carbonate reservoir in [...] Read more.
Carbonate reservoirs form important exploration targets for the oil and gas industry in many parts of the world. This study aims to differentiate and quantify pore types and their relation to petrophysical properties in the Permo-Triassic Khuff Formation, a major carbonate reservoir in Oman. For that purpose, we have employed a number of laboratory techniques to test their applicability for the characterization of respective rock types. Consequently, a workflow has been established utilizing a combined analysis of petrographic and petrophysical methods which provide the best results for pore-system characterization. Micro-computed tomography (µCT) analysis allows a representative 3D assessment of total porosity, pore connectivity, and effective porosity of the ooid-shoal facies but it cannot resolve the full pore-size spectrum of the highly microporous mud-/wackestone facies. In order to resolve the smallest pores, combined mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and BIB (broad ion beam)-SEM analyses allow covering a large pore size range from millimeter to nanometer scale. Combining these techniques, three different rock types with clearly discernible pore networks can be defined. Moldic porosity in combination with intercrystalline porosity results in the highest effective porosities and permeabilities in shoal facies. In back-shoal facies, dolomitization leads to low total porosity but well-connected and heterogeneously distributed vuggy and intercrystalline pores which improves permeability. Micro- and nanopores are present in all analyzed samples but their contribution to effective porosity depends on the textural context. Our results confirm that each individual rock type requires the application of appropriate laboratory techniques. Additionally, we observe a strong correlation between the inverse formation resistivity factor and permeability suggesting that pore connectivity is the dominating factor for permeability but not pore size. In the future, this relationship should be further investigated as it could potentially be used to predict permeability from wireline resistivity measured in the flushed zone close to the borehole wall. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Characterization and Simulation of Carbonate Reservoirs)
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Open AccessArticle
Discrete Fracture Network Modelling in Triassic–Jurassic Carbonates of NW Lurestan, Zagros Fold-and-Thrust Belt, Iran
Geosciences 2019, 9(12), 496; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences9120496 - 26 Nov 2019
Abstract
In this study, discrete fracture network (DFN) modelling was performed for Triassic–Jurassic analogue reservoir units of the NW Lurestan region, Iran. The modelling was elaborated following a multi-scale statistical sampling of the fracture systems characterising the analysed succession. The multi-scale approach was performed [...] Read more.
In this study, discrete fracture network (DFN) modelling was performed for Triassic–Jurassic analogue reservoir units of the NW Lurestan region, Iran. The modelling was elaborated following a multi-scale statistical sampling of the fracture systems characterising the analysed succession. The multi-scale approach was performed at two different observation scales. At the macro-scale, a digital outcrop analysis was carried out by means of a digital line-drawing based on camera-acquired images, focussing on the distribution of major throughgoing fractures; at the meso-scale, the scan line method was applied to investigate the background fractures of the examined formations. The gathered data were statistically analysed in order to estimate the laws governing the statistical distribution of some key fracture set attributes, namely, spacing, aperture, and height. The collected dataset was used for the DFN modelling, allowing the evaluation of the relative connectivity of the fracture systems and, therefore, defining the architecture and the geometries within the fracture network. The performed fracture modelling, confirmed, once again, the crucial impact that large-scale throughgoing fractures have on the decompartmentalization of a reservoir and on the related fluid flow migration processes. The derived petrophysical properties distribution showed in the models, defined the Kurra Chine Fm. and, especially, the Sehkaniyan Fm. as good-quality reservoir units, whereas the Sarki Fm was considered a poor-quality reservoir unit. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Characterization and Simulation of Carbonate Reservoirs)
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