Special Issue "Rock Fall Protection for Surface Mining"

A special issue of Geosciences (ISSN 2076-3263).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 May 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Daniele Peila
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Environment, Land and Infrastructure Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Torino, Italy
Interests: tunnelling; mining; TBM; rock fall protection; quarry exploitation
Dr. Maddalena Marchelli
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Environment, Land and Infrastructure Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Torino, Italy
Interests: hazard and risk analysis; rockfall protection techniques; landslide propagation analysis; mitigation measures

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Rockfall represents one of the most dangerous landslide phenomena, due to its unpredictability, its abruptness, and the very high energy involved. The detachment of rock blocks can affect not only natural slopes but it also represents a serious hazard in mining environments, causing possible damage to personnel, machinery, and infrastructures.

Consequently, an accurate and effective predisposal and design of mitigation measures and, above all, structural protection works are required.

The development of new rockfall protective assembling systems, products, and technologies can significantly improve risk mitigation. Nevertheless, a codified design procedure is often missing.

This Special Issue aims to attract world-leading researchers in the area of rockfall and mining to highlight the importance of the design of effective and efficient mitigation measures, outlining innovative solutions and technologies, as well as design procedures. A special focus has to also be devoted to the effects of aging, corrosion, exceptional loads, and other phenomena that can occur during the working life of the protective devices, providing profitable solutions to evaluate the residual efficiency, and to predispose maintenance and repair works.

Dr. Daniele Peila
Dr. Maddalena Marchelli
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • rockfall mitigation measures
  • rockfall protection structures
  • surface mine
  • underground mine
  • full-scale tests
  • numerical models

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Review
Digital Elevation Models of Rockfalls and Landslides: A Review and Meta-Analysis
Geosciences 2021, 11(6), 256; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences11060256 - 14 Jun 2021
Viewed by 887
Abstract
The scope of this paper is to summarize previous research pertaining to the use of digital elevation models (DEMs) and digital terrain models (DTMs) in the study of rockfalls and landslides. Research from 1983 to 2020 was surveyed in order to understand how [...] Read more.
The scope of this paper is to summarize previous research pertaining to the use of digital elevation models (DEMs) and digital terrain models (DTMs) in the study of rockfalls and landslides. Research from 1983 to 2020 was surveyed in order to understand how the spatial resolution of DEMs and DTMs affects landslide detection, validation, and mapping. Another major question examined was the relationship between the DEM resolution and the extent of the rockfall or landslide event. It emerged from the study that, for landslides, the majority of researchers used DEMs with a spatial resolution of between 10 m and 30 m, while for rockfalls, they used DEMs with a spatial resolution of between 5 m and 20 m. We concluded that DEMs with a very high resolution (less than 5 m) are suitable for local-scale occurrences, while medium-resolution (from 20 m to 30 m) DEMs are suitable for regional-scale events. High resolution is associated with high accuracy and detailed structural characteristics, while medium accuracy better illustrates the topographic features. A low pixel size (more than 90 m) is not recommended for this type of research. Susceptibility maps, inventory maps, hazard risk zones, and vulnerability assessments are some of the main tools used in landslide/rockfall investigations, and topographic indexes, methods, models, and software optimize the reliability of the results. All of these parameters are closely related to DEMs and DTMs as the cell size affects the credibility of the final outcome. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rock Fall Protection for Surface Mining)
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