Special Issue "Geovisualization: Current Trends, Challenges, and Applications"

A special issue of Geographies (ISSN 2673-7086).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2023 | Viewed by 10916

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Vassilios Krassanakis
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Surveying and Geoinformatics Engineering, School of Engineering, University of West Attica, 12243 Egaleo, Greece
Interests: cartography; eye tracking; geovisualization; GIS; visual perception
Dr. Andriani Skopeliti
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Cartography Laboratory, School of Rural, Surveying and Geoinformatics Engineering (SRSE), National Technical University of Athens, 15780 Zographos, Greece
Interests: cartographic generalization; web mapping; VGI quality; spatial data quality visualization
Dr. Merve Keskin
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geoinformatics and Cartography, Finnish Geospatial Research Institute (FGI), National Land Survey of Finland, 02430 Kirkkonummi, Finland
Interests: cartography; spatial cognition; cartographic usability; eye tracking; GIS
Dr. Paweł Cybulski
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Cartography and Geomatics, Faculty of Geographical and Geological Sciences, Adam Mickiewicz University, 61-680 Poznań, Poland
Interests: cartographic animation; eye tracking; geovisualization; multimedia cartography; visual perception
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The process of geovisualization involves scientific techniques which are implemented in order to represent spatiotemporal information that describes geographic entities and phenomena. The application of geovisualization methods allows the visual exploration of geospatial data using static, animated, and interactive cartographic products. The majority of spatial analysis and geographic information system applications resulted in specific representations which could substantially support the identification of potential relationships, patterns and trends related to the spatial and temporal distribution of geographic data. Hence, the geovisualization process has become an essential part of different crucial research/scientific and professional domains. Undoubtedly, the immense availability of both open source and proprietary software tools, the considerable number of available sensors and devices, as well as the freely distributed geospatial data have contributed toward this direction. However, the popularity that geovisualization methods have gained implies several challenges and new solutions, especially considering the advent of the Big Data era.

This Special Issue aims to collect innovative and high-quality research articles related to current trends and challenges in the field of geovisualization in 2D and 3D. Additionally, possible contributions could describe specific applications in several related domains. Comprehensive and systematic literature review articles in the field are also welcome.

More specifically, potential topics include (but are not limited to) the followings:

  • New geovisualization design methods;
  • Geovisualization variables and principles;
  • Evaluation and/or comparison of different geovisualization methods;
  • New geovisualization software tools;
  • Theoretical and experimental studies in geovisualization;
  • Geovisualization and Big Data;
  • Geovisualization and VR/AR applications;
  • Geovisualization in local, mobile, and web environments;
  • Printed and digital map collections;
  • Geovisualization applications in different fields (e.g., spatial analysis and planning, environment, climate change, hydrology, geology, history, education, archaeology, epidemiology, biology);

Comprehensive and systematic literature reviews on any of the aforementioned topics.

Dr. Vassilios Krassanakis
Dr. Andriani Skopeliti
Dr. Merve Keskin
Dr. Paweł Cybulski
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Geographies is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • geovisualization
  • map design
  • cartographic applications
  • software tools
  • geospatial (big) data
  • cartography
  • geographic information science
  • geoinformatics
  • geography
  • spatial analysis and planning

Published Papers (6 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Other

Article
Studying the Utilization of a Map-Based Visualization with Vitality Datasets by Domain Experts
Geographies 2022, 2(3), 379-396; https://doi.org/10.3390/geographies2030024 - 30 Jun 2022
Viewed by 1138
Abstract
With the rapid growth of information technology and geographic information science, many map-based visualization applications for decision-making have been proposed. These applications are used in various contexts. Our study provides empirical evidence of how domain experts utilize map-based data visualization for generating insights [...] Read more.
With the rapid growth of information technology and geographic information science, many map-based visualization applications for decision-making have been proposed. These applications are used in various contexts. Our study provides empirical evidence of how domain experts utilize map-based data visualization for generating insights into vitality with respect to health-related concepts. We conducted a study to understand domain experts’ knowledge, approach, and experience. Nine domain experts participated in the study, with three experts each from the fields of government, business, and research. The study followed a mixed-methods approach involving an online survey, open-ended tasks, and semi-structured interviews. For this purpose, a map-based data visualization application containing various vitality-related datasets was developed for the open-ended tasks. Our study confirms the importance of maps in this domain but also shows that vitality is strongly geographical. Furthermore, we found that map-based visualizations require multiple data sources and dimensions to enhance the utilization of them in the context of vitality. Therefore, our study suggests the necessity of a combination of multiple datasets as ‘vitality themes’ to efficiently communicate this particular subject to experts. As such, our results provide guidelines for designing map-based data visualizations that support the decision-making process across various domain experts in the field of vitality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geovisualization: Current Trends, Challenges, and Applications)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Geovisualization of Hydrological Flow in Hexagonal Grid Systems
Geographies 2022, 2(2), 227-244; https://doi.org/10.3390/geographies2020016 - 29 Apr 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1194
Abstract
Recent research has extended conventional hydrological algorithms into a hexagonal grid and noted that hydrological modeling on a hexagonal mesh grid outperformed that on a rectangular grid. Among the hydrological products, flow routing grids are the base of many other hydrological simulations, such [...] Read more.
Recent research has extended conventional hydrological algorithms into a hexagonal grid and noted that hydrological modeling on a hexagonal mesh grid outperformed that on a rectangular grid. Among the hydrological products, flow routing grids are the base of many other hydrological simulations, such as flow accumulation, watershed delineation, and stream networks. However, most of the previous research adopted the D6 algorithm, which is analogous to the D8 algorithm over a rectangular grid, to produce flow routing. This paper explored another four methods regarding generating flow directions in a hexagonal grid, based on four algorithms of slope aspect computation. We also developed and visualized hexagonal-grid-based hydrological operations, including flow accumulation, watershed delineation, and hydrological indices computation. Experiments were carried out across multiple grid resolutions with various terrain roughness. The results showed that flow direction can vary among different approaches, and the impact of such variation can propagate to flow accumulation, watershed delineation, and hydrological indices production, which was reflected by the cell-wise comparison and visualization. This research is practical for hydrological analysis in hexagonal, hierarchical grids, such as Discrete Global Grid Systems, and the developed operations can be used in flood modeling in the real world. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geovisualization: Current Trends, Challenges, and Applications)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Spatial Modelling and Geovisualization of House Prices in the Greater Athens Region, Greece
Geographies 2022, 2(1), 111-131; https://doi.org/10.3390/geographies2010008 - 21 Feb 2022
Viewed by 1201
Abstract
In this article, geovisualization is used for the presentation and interpretation of spatial analysis results concerning several house attributes. For that purpose, point data for houses in the region of Attica, Greece are analyzed. The data concern houses for sale and comprise structural [...] Read more.
In this article, geovisualization is used for the presentation and interpretation of spatial analysis results concerning several house attributes. For that purpose, point data for houses in the region of Attica, Greece are analyzed. The data concern houses for sale and comprise structural characteristics, such as size, age and floor, as well as locational attributes. Geovisualization of house characteristics is performed employing spatial interpolation techniques, kriging techniques, in particular. Spatial autocorrelation in the data is examined through the calculation of the Moran’s I coefficient, while spatial clusters of houses with similar characteristics are identified using the Getis-Ord Gi* local spatial autocorrelation coefficient. Finally, a model is developed in order to predict house prices according to several structural and locational characteristics. In that respect, a classic hedonic pricing model is constructed, which is consequently developed as a geographically weighted regression (GWR) model in a GIS environment. The results of this model indicate that two characteristics, i.e., size and age, account for most of the variability in house prices in the study region. Since GWR is a local model producing different regression parameters for each observation, it is possible to obtain the spatial distribution of the regression parameters, which indicate the significance of the house characteristics for price determination in different locations in the study area. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geovisualization: Current Trends, Challenges, and Applications)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Article
Cartography and Art: A Comparative Study Based on Color
Geographies 2022, 2(1), 87-110; https://doi.org/10.3390/geographies2010007 - 15 Feb 2022
Viewed by 1505
Abstract
Color occupies a prominent place in the bibliography of cartography, as it is an important element in the formation of cartographic symbolization. Apart from the technical issues of its application to maps, color theory is one of the elements that connect maps with [...] Read more.
Color occupies a prominent place in the bibliography of cartography, as it is an important element in the formation of cartographic symbolization. Apart from the technical issues of its application to maps, color theory is one of the elements that connect maps with art. In this paper various cartographic trends and their origins are examined and correlated with the artistic periods in which they were developed in order to investigate and document the extent to which maps follow the artistic movements and, particularly in the art of painting, concerning the form and the content of the maps and whether color can be used as an identification element of the art trend and the corresponding period. The research spans from the end of the Middle Ages to the 21st century and is referred spatially in Western Europe, including Italy. The comparison of colors is made in both descriptive and quantitative terms through the commentary of hue, brightness, and saturation, as well as through plotting them in the color wheel, a process that allows an overview of the range and location of color sequences. Concluding, the paintings and maps that were selected and examined in detail support the effect of painting on maps, without implying that it is intentional. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geovisualization: Current Trends, Challenges, and Applications)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Article
Automatic Unfolding of CityGML Buildings to Paper Models
Geographies 2021, 1(3), 333-345; https://doi.org/10.3390/geographies1030018 - 01 Dec 2021
Viewed by 1988
Abstract
3D city models are mainly viewed on computer screens, but many municipalities also use 3D printing to make urban planning tangible. Since 3D color printing is still comparatively expensive and the colors often fade over time, many of these models are monochrome. Here, [...] Read more.
3D city models are mainly viewed on computer screens, but many municipalities also use 3D printing to make urban planning tangible. Since 3D color printing is still comparatively expensive and the colors often fade over time, many of these models are monochrome. Here, color textured paper models offer an inexpensive and under-appreciated alternative. In this paper, a greedy algorithm adapted to CityGML building models is presented, which creates print templates for such paper models. These 2D layouts consist of cut edges and fold edges that bound polygons of a building. The polygons can be textured or left blank depending on the existence of CityGML textures. Glue tabs are attached to cut edges. In addition to the haptic 3D visualization, the quality of the 3D models can sometimes be better assessed on the basis of the print templates than from a perspective projection. The unfolding procedure was applied to parts of the freely available CityGML model of Berlin as well as to parts of models of the cities of Dortmund and Krefeld. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geovisualization: Current Trends, Challenges, and Applications)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research

Technical Note
Mapping Construction Costs at the National Level
Geographies 2022, 2(1), 132-144; https://doi.org/10.3390/geographies2010009 - 01 Mar 2022
Viewed by 1639
Abstract
The construction industry relies on construction cost indexes to prepare cost estimate benchmarks and develop cost estimates. Subsequently, government agencies, non-profit organizations, and private companies routinely publish construction cost indexes for cities. Currently, all construction cost indexes are released in a tabular format [...] Read more.
The construction industry relies on construction cost indexes to prepare cost estimate benchmarks and develop cost estimates. Subsequently, government agencies, non-profit organizations, and private companies routinely publish construction cost indexes for cities. Currently, all construction cost indexes are released in a tabular format for 649 cities across the conterminous United States, which is not effective in illustrating construction cost variations at the national level. This study explored the utility of various established interpolation methods and mapping techniques to visualize construction cost indexes at the national level. Geovisualization techniques such as thematic mapping provide a visual representation of construction cost data in addition to traditional tabular formats. This study explored the utility of Thiessen polygon and inverse distance weighted (IDW) methods to create thematic maps which can be used to interactively visualize construction costs at the national level. A qualitative comparison revealed that the IDW method can produce the most intuitive, interactive, and continuous surface maps to identify dynamic and previously unrecognized patterns. These continuous surface maps allow construction practitioners and academics, real estate developers, and the public to locate the geographic proximity of high or low construction costs while cost change maps allow investors and businesses to identify patterns in changing construction costs over a certain period. This work contributes to the body of knowledge by introducing interpolated maps for visualizing any construction cost-related indexes at a large scale such as the national level. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geovisualization: Current Trends, Challenges, and Applications)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop