Synthesis and Applications of Hydrogels (2nd Edition)

A special issue of Gels (ISSN 2310-2861). This special issue belongs to the section "Gel Chemistry and Physics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2024) | Viewed by 3836

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Guest Editor
School of Mechanical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061, China
Interests: hydrogels; colloids and interfaces; 3D printing; surface forces
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Dear Colleagues,

Hydrogels have been used for producing contact lenses, flexible sensors and actuators, adhesives, wound dressings, and hygiene products and are critical to achieving the controlled release of bioactive molecules. The synthesis and application of hydrogels have received increasing attention across a number of disciplines over the past twenty years. We have seen increasing publications in hydrogel research, and the scientific field is evolving rapidly. For example, three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting using cell-loaded hydrogel composites has been one of the emerging topics for realizing artificial organs in biomedical research. The significant point of synthesizing a hydrogel is that the obtained gel should have reasonable mechanical and electrical properties and form effective interfacial connections with various substrates. Double- or even triple-network hydrogels have been fabricated to overcome the drawbacks of weak mechanical properties and low interfacial toughness. Additionally, mechanical training, salt precipitation, and the application of electric or magnetic fields have also been applied to hydrogel synthesis to achieve the desired properties. Challenges remain for commercialization, although a number of hydrogel-related patents are filed each year.

This Special Issue aims to report the most recent research and advances in hydrogel synthesis and applications, such as sensors and actuators, adhesives, 3D printing, etc. Research on new methodologies, mechanism studies, and the modeling of hydrogels are also welcome.

Prof. Dr. Jun Huang
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Gels is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biomaterials
  • sensors and actuators
  • adhesives
  • flexible electronics
  • 3D printing
  • drug delivery
  • network

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Published Papers (2 papers)

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12 pages, 2537 KiB  
Article
Cysteine–Silver–Polymer Systems for the Preparation of Hydrogels and Films with Potential Applications in Regenerative Medicine
by Dmitry V. Vishnevetskii, Arif R. Mekhtiev, Dmitry V. Averkin and Elizaveta E. Polyakova
Gels 2023, 9(12), 924; https://doi.org/10.3390/gels9120924 - 23 Nov 2023
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Abstract
Herein, the problem concerning the poorer mechanical properties of gels based on low molecular weight gelators (LMWGs)—L-cysteine and silver nitrate—was solved by the addition of various polymers—polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) and polyethylene glycol (PEG)—to the initial cysteine–silver sol (CSS). The physicochemical [...] Read more.
Herein, the problem concerning the poorer mechanical properties of gels based on low molecular weight gelators (LMWGs)—L-cysteine and silver nitrate—was solved by the addition of various polymers—polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) and polyethylene glycol (PEG)—to the initial cysteine–silver sol (CSS). The physicochemical methods of analysis—viscosimetry, UV spectroscopy, DLS, and SEM—identified that cysteine–silver hydrogels (CSG) based on PVA possess the best rheological properties and porous microstructure (the average pore size is 2–10 µm) compared to gels without the polymer or with PVP or PEG. Such gels are able to form cysteine–silver cryogels (CSC) and then porous cysteine–silver films (CSF) with an average pore size of 10–20 µm and good mechanical, swelling, and adhesion to skin characteristics as long as the structure of CSS particles remains stable. In vitro experiments have shown that hydrogels are non-toxic to normal human fibroblast cells. The obtained materials could potentially be applied to regenerative medicine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Synthesis and Applications of Hydrogels (2nd Edition))
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31 pages, 5162 KiB  
Review
Recent Advances in the Development of Biomimetic Materials
by Maria G. Ciulla, Alessio Massironi, Michela Sugni, Matthew A. Ensign, Stefania Marzorati and Mahdi Forouharshad
Gels 2023, 9(10), 833; https://doi.org/10.3390/gels9100833 - 20 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2364
Abstract
In this review, we focused on recent efforts in the design and development of materials with biomimetic properties. Innovative methods promise to emulate cell microenvironments and tissue functions, but many aspects regarding cellular communication, motility, and responsiveness remain to be explained. We photographed [...] Read more.
In this review, we focused on recent efforts in the design and development of materials with biomimetic properties. Innovative methods promise to emulate cell microenvironments and tissue functions, but many aspects regarding cellular communication, motility, and responsiveness remain to be explained. We photographed the state-of-the-art advancements in biomimetics, and discussed the complexity of a “bottom-up” artificial construction of living systems, with particular highlights on hydrogels, collagen-based composites, surface modifications, and three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting applications. Fast-paced 3D printing and artificial intelligence, nevertheless, collide with reality: How difficult can it be to build reproducible biomimetic materials at a real scale in line with the complexity of living systems? Nowadays, science is in urgent need of bioengineering technologies for the practical use of bioinspired and biomimetics for medicine and clinics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Synthesis and Applications of Hydrogels (2nd Edition))
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