Special Issue "Geopolymer Based Fiber Reinforced Composites"

A special issue of Fibers (ISSN 2079-6439).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Faiz Shaikh

Department of Civil Engineering, School of Civil and Mechanical Engineering Curtin University, Kent St, Bentley WA 6102, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 08 9266 9054
Interests: Development of Engineered Geopolymer Composites (EGC); Structural application of Engineered Cementitious Composites (ECC); Application of nano-technology and nano particles in concrete; utilisation of supplementary cementitious materials (SCM), recycled aggregates, polymers and other industrial by-products in concrete and their effects on superior durability of concrete; Durability of reinforced concrete (RC), ECC and EGC; Repair and strengthening of reinforced concrete using ECC and EGC; Numerical modelling of RC

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Geopolymer has emerged as a sustainable alternative to conventional ordinary Portland cement (OPC) binder in construction. Geopolymer binder exhibited superior mechanical, durability and fire resistance properties and significantly lower carbon footprint that its OPC binder. To improve the brittleness of geopolymer various types of both short and continuous fiber are added to increase the tensile and flexural strength, ductility, toughness and energy absorption capacities of fiber reinforced geopolymer composites. This special issue will present original research articles on the fiber reinforced geopolymer composites as well as review article on this emerging topic. Researchers currently working on fiber reinforced geopolymer composites around the world are invited to showcase their research by submitting their original or review article in this special issue of journal of “Fibers”.

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Faiz Shaikh
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Fibers is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Geopolymer
  • Alkali activated slag
  • Natural fiber
  • Metallic fiber
  • Polymeric fiber
  • Continuous fiber
  • Fabric

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Indirect Tensile Behaviour of Fibre Reinforced Alkali-Activated Composites
Fibers 2018, 6(2), 30; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib6020030
Received: 19 February 2018 / Revised: 26 March 2018 / Accepted: 12 April 2018 / Published: 14 May 2018
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Abstract
There are currently still some sustainability-related issues that need to be tackled within the construction sector. Namely, cement production is accountable for nearby 5% of the worldwide total CO2-eq release. Therefore, environmentally viable and economically sustainable solutions need to be pursued
[...] Read more.
There are currently still some sustainability-related issues that need to be tackled within the construction sector. Namely, cement production is accountable for nearby 5% of the worldwide total CO2-eq release. Therefore, environmentally viable and economically sustainable solutions need to be pursued in order to mitigate the use of Portland cement. The incorporation of industrial waste in concrete compositions, such as fly ash (from coal combustion in power stations) is a feasible alternative. The properties of these residues may be enhanced through alkaline activation, which is able to yield aluminosilicate-based materials with excellent physico-chemical properties. Nonetheless, these materials exhibit a brittle behaviour. Therefore, the present work addresses the study of alkali-activated composites reinforced with sisal fibres. For that purpose, alkali-activated Class F fly ash was mixed with natural fibres and the composite mechanical behaviour was assessed through both indirect tensile and compressive tests. Four different fibre contents, in wt % of fly ash (0, 0.2, 0.6 and 1%), two fibre lengths (13 and 50 mm) and four curing periods (14, 28, 56 and 112 days) were considered. Results confirm that the post-cracking response of these composites was improved with the inclusion of sisal fibres. In general, higher residual tensile strengths and dissipated energy were observed for the lengthier fibres, i.e., 50 mm. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geopolymer Based Fiber Reinforced Composites)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Flexural Behavior of Hybrid PVA Fiber and AR-Glass Textile Reinforced Geopolymer Composites
Received: 20 November 2017 / Revised: 8 December 2017 / Accepted: 14 December 2017 / Published: 1 January 2018
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Abstract
Textile reinforced mortar or concrete, a thin cementitious composite reinforced by non-corrosive polymer textile fabric, was developed and has been researched for its role on repair and strengthening of reinforced concrete (RC) structures. Due to embedment of polymeric textile fabric inside the cementitious
[...] Read more.
Textile reinforced mortar or concrete, a thin cementitious composite reinforced by non-corrosive polymer textile fabric, was developed and has been researched for its role on repair and strengthening of reinforced concrete (RC) structures. Due to embedment of polymeric textile fabric inside the cementitious matrix, many researchers argued the superiority of this technology than the externally bonded fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) sheet in RC in terms of prevention of debonding of FRP and durability in fire. However, due to use of cement rich matrix the existing development of textile reinforced concrete (TRC) need to be more environmental friendly by replacing cement based binder with geopolymeric binder. This paper presents a first study on the flexural behavior of alkali resistant glass fiber textile reinforced geopolymer (TRG). In this study, two types of geopolymer binder is considered. One is fly ash based heat cured geopolymer and the other is fly ash/slag blended ambient air cured geopolymer binder. Both geopolymer types are considered in the TRG and the results are benchmarked with the current cement based TRC. The effect of short polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fiber as hybrid reinforced with alkali-resistant (AR) glass fiber textile on the flexural behavior of above TRC and TRGs is also studied. Results show deflection hardening behavior of both TRGs with higher flexural strength in heat cured TRG and higher deflection capacity at peak load in ambient air cured TRG. The increase in PVA fiber volume fraction from 1% to 1.5% did not show any improvement in flexural strength of both TRGs although TRC showed good improvement. In the case of deflection at peak load, an opposite phenomenon is observed where the deflection at peak load in both TRGs is increased due to increase in PVA fiber volume fractions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geopolymer Based Fiber Reinforced Composites)
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Open AccessArticle Enhancement Experiment on Cementitious Activity of Copper-Mine Tailings in a Geopolymer System
Fibers 2017, 5(4), 47; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib5040047
Received: 21 September 2017 / Revised: 7 December 2017 / Accepted: 14 December 2017 / Published: 15 December 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (7280 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Copper-mine tailings are the residual products after the extraction of precious copper metal from copper ores, and their storage can create numerous environmental problems. Many researchers have used copper-mine tailings for the preparation of geopolymers. This paper studies the enhancement of the cementitious
[...] Read more.
Copper-mine tailings are the residual products after the extraction of precious copper metal from copper ores, and their storage can create numerous environmental problems. Many researchers have used copper-mine tailings for the preparation of geopolymers. This paper studies the enhancement of the cementitious activity of copper-mine tailings in geopolymer systems. First, copper-mine tailings are activated through mechanical grinding activation. Then, the mechanically activated copper-mine tailings are further processed through thermal activation and alkaline-roasting activation. The cementitious activity index of copper-mine tailings is characterized through the degree of leaching concentration of Si and Al. It was observed that the Si and Al leaching concentration of mechanically activated tailings was increased by 26.03% and 93.33%, respectively. The concentration of Si and Al was increased by 54.19% and 119.92%, respectively. For alkaline-roasting activation, roasting time, temperature and the mass ratio of copper-mine tailings to NaOH (C/N ratio) were evaluated through orthogonal tests, and the best condition for activation was 120 min at 600 °C with a C/N ratio of 5:1. In this study, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and infra-red (IR) analysis show that mechanical, thermal and alkaline-roasting activation could be used to improve the cementitious activity index of copper-mine tailings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geopolymer Based Fiber Reinforced Composites)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Tensile behaviour of fibre reinforced alkali activated composites
Authors: Nuno Cristelo, Victor M.C.F. Cunha, Filipe Almeida
Abstract: The technological evolution of the construction industry has yet to tackle one significant issue, which is the fact that cement production is responsible for almost 10 % of the total CO2-eq release. To reduce, in the near future, the consumption of Portland cement, environmentally viable and economically sustainable solutions need to be developed. These will include the incorporation of large volumes of industrial waste, like fly ash from the combustion of coal in power stations. One possible way to take advantage of the properties of these residues, possibly the most promising, is the technique known as alkaline activation, capable to produce aluminosilicate-based materials with excellent physical and chemical properties, and a wide range of applications. Nevertheless, one of the drawbacks of these composite materials is their brittle behavior. Thus, the present work aims to study the effects of reinforcing alkali activated composites with sisal fibers. For that, alkali activated fly ash F was mixed with fibres, and resulting response was measured through uniaxial compression tests and indirect tensile tests. Four different fibre contents (0%, 0.2%, 0.6% and 1%), two sizes (13mm and 50mm) and four curing periods (14, 28 , 56 and 112 days) were considered. Results confirm that the behaviour of alkali activated composites is enhanced with the addition of sisal fibres.

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