The Relationship between Nutrition and Diseases 2.0

A special issue of Diseases (ISSN 2079-9721).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 April 2023) | Viewed by 17696

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Center for the Study of Metabolism, Body Composition and Lifestyle, Department of Biomedical, Metabolic and Neural Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, 41125 Modena, Italy
Interests: obesity; obesity-related diseases; sarcopenic obesity; metabolism; energy expenditure; body composition; physical activity; lifestyle
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Diseases is launching a Special Issue entitled “The Relationship between Nutrition and Diseases”. Diseases is an international, peer-reviewed, open-access, multidisciplinary journal that focuses on the latest and most outstanding research on diseases and conditions. It is published quarterly online by MDPI. The first Issue was released in 2013.

Hippocrates said “Let food be thy medicine, and let medicine be thy food”, and since then there has been a great and growing interest in studying the potential link between nutrition and disease, mainly under two disciplines: “nutritional epidemiology” and “lifestyle medicine”. To date, a wide spectrum of results have confirmed this link; however, many of these need to be interpreted with caution before jumping to conclusions in proposing certain nutrients as preventative and therapeutic strategies for diseases. This is because many of these findings derive from cross-sectional studies that indicate only simple associations between a certain nutrient and a specific disease, and do not provide solid information regarding any causal relationships between the two conditions.

This Special Issue will provide a platform for the presentation of recent advances in knowledge of the “real” relationships between nutrition and disease, coming from diverse scientific disciplines.

Prof. Dr. Marwan El Ghoch
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diseases is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cardiovascular diseases
  • diabetes
  • obesity
  • cancer dyslipidemia
  • clinical nutrition
  • weight-related morbidities
  • sarcopenia
  • eating disorders
  • gut microbiota
  • anorexia and bulimia nervosa
  • binge-eating disorder
  • depression

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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11 pages, 1782 KiB  
Article
Assessing Anti-Adipogenic Effects of Mango Leaf Tea and Mangiferin within Cultured Adipocytes
by Sepideh Alasvand Zarasvand, Vivian Haley-Zitlin, Olanrewaju Oladosu, Ikechukwu Esobi, Rhonda Reigers Powell, Terri Bruce and Alexis Stamatikos
Diseases 2023, 11(2), 70; https://doi.org/10.3390/diseases11020070 - 10 May 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3159
Abstract
Obesity is a condition caused by surplus adipose tissue and is a risk factor for several diet-related diseases. Obesity is a global epidemic that has also been challenging to treat effectively. However, one promoted therapy to safely treat obesity is anti-adipogenic therapeutics. Therefore, [...] Read more.
Obesity is a condition caused by surplus adipose tissue and is a risk factor for several diet-related diseases. Obesity is a global epidemic that has also been challenging to treat effectively. However, one promoted therapy to safely treat obesity is anti-adipogenic therapeutics. Therefore, identifying potent anti-adipogenic bioactive compounds that can safely be used clinically may effectively treat obesity in humans. Mango leaf has potential medicinal properties due to its many bioactive compounds that may enhance human health. Mangiferin (MGF) is a primary constituent in mango plants, with many health-promoting qualities. Therefore, this study investigated the effect of MGF, and tea brewed with mango leaves in cultured adipocytes. The anti-adipogenic efficacy of mango leaf tea (MLT) and MGF in 3T3-L1 cells were assessed, along with cell viability, triglyceride levels, adiponectin secretion, and glucose uptake analyzed. In addition, changes in the mRNA expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism within 3T3-L1 cells were determined using quantitative real-time PCR. Our results showed while both MLT and MGF increased glucose uptake in adipocytes, only MLT appeared to inhibit adipogenesis, as determined by decreased triglyceride accumulation. We also observed increased secretory adiponectin levels, reduced ACC mRNA expression, and increased FOXO1 and ATGL gene expression in 3T3-L1 cells treated with MLT but not MGF. Together, these results suggest that MLT may exhibit anti-adipogenic properties independent of MGF content. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Relationship between Nutrition and Diseases 2.0)
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26 pages, 633 KiB  
Article
Vitamin D and Calcium in Osteoporosis, and the Role of Bone Turnover Markers: A Narrative Review of Recent Data from RCTs
by Gavriela Voulgaridou, Sousana K. Papadopoulou, Paraskevi Detopoulou, Despoina Tsoumana, Constantinos Giaginis, Foivi S. Kondyli, Evgenia Lymperaki and Agathi Pritsa
Diseases 2023, 11(1), 29; https://doi.org/10.3390/diseases11010029 - 8 Feb 2023
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 5745
Abstract
Osteoporosis is a common disease, defined primarily by a low measured bone density, which is associated with an increased risk of fragility fractures. Low calcium intake and vitamin D deficiency seem to be positively correlated with the prevalence of osteoporosis. Although they are [...] Read more.
Osteoporosis is a common disease, defined primarily by a low measured bone density, which is associated with an increased risk of fragility fractures. Low calcium intake and vitamin D deficiency seem to be positively correlated with the prevalence of osteoporosis. Although they are not suitable for the diagnosis of osteoporosis, the biochemical markers of bone turnover can be measured in serum and/or urine, enabling the assessment of the dynamic bone activity and the short-term effectiveness of the osteoporosis treatment. Calcium and vitamin D are essential for maintaining bone health. The aim of this narrative review is to summarize the effects of vitamin D and calcium supplementation separately and in combination, on bone density and circulating serum and blood plasma vitamin D, calcium, parathyroid hormone levels, markers of bone metabolism concentrations, and clinical outcomes, such as falls and osteoporotic fractures. We searched the PubMed online database to find clinical trials from the last five years (2016–April 2022). A total of 26 randomized clinical trials (RCTs) were included in this review. The present reviewed evidence suggests that vitamin D alone or in combination with calcium increases circulating 25(OH)D. Calcium with concomitant vitamin D supplementation, but not vitamin D alone, leads to an increase in BMD. In addition, most studies did not detect significant changes in circulating levels of plasma bone metabolism markers, nor in the incidence of falls. Instead, there was a decrease in blood serum PTH levels in the groups receiving vitamin D and/or Ca supplementation. The plasma vitamin D levels at the beginning of the intervention, and the dosing regimen followed, may play a role in the observed parameters. However, further study is needed to determine an appropriate dosing regimen for the treatment of osteoporosis and the role of bone metabolism markers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Relationship between Nutrition and Diseases 2.0)
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16 pages, 606 KiB  
Article
Functional Gastrointestinal Diseases and Dietary Practices among Pakistani Children—A Schools Based Cross-Sectional Study
by Zoha Imtiaz Malik, Muhammad Farooq Umer, Khizar Nabeel Ali, Ayesha Babar Kawish, Muhammad Arshed, Shumaila Zofeen and Awais Farid
Diseases 2022, 10(4), 103; https://doi.org/10.3390/diseases10040103 - 16 Nov 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2026
Abstract
Background: Functional gastrointestinal diseases (FGIDs) are an important yet highly under explored area among public health issues. FGIDs’ complex etiology makes them of interest along with their prevalence in children steadily increasing, especially in the developing world. We aimed to determine the burden [...] Read more.
Background: Functional gastrointestinal diseases (FGIDs) are an important yet highly under explored area among public health issues. FGIDs’ complex etiology makes them of interest along with their prevalence in children steadily increasing, especially in the developing world. We aimed to determine the burden FGIDs pose on school-going children, and to determine its association with the dietary intake patterns in Pakistani children. Methodology: The study included 385 school-children from public and private schools in Pakistan through multistage random sampling, from March to August 2022. We used the Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) and Rome IV Criteria for a comprehensive exploration of the issue. Associations between the FGIDs and dietary factors were analyzed using chi-square and Fischer’s exact tests in SPSS version 26.0. Results: Females constituted 77.4% (n = 298) of all respondents, while 44.9% (n = 173) of the total reported a family history of gastrointestinal diseases. FFQ analysis showed varying consumption frequencies for different food groups. Functional abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) were the highest reported FGIDs with a prevalence of 38.7% (n = 149) and 24.9% (n = 96), respectively. Statistical associations were found between different FGIDs and gender, age, household income, family members, and dietary variables such as fruit, vegetable, beverage and pulse consumption. Conclusion: FGIDs were found to be associated with a number of socio-demographic and dietary factors which calls for small scale and large scale attention to the issue. Results from the current study and further studies may help develop guidelines to manage these disorders in Pakistan. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Relationship between Nutrition and Diseases 2.0)
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7 pages, 899 KiB  
Opinion
Tricking the Brain with Leptin to Limit Post Liposuction and Post Bariatric Surgery Weight Regain?
by Abdelaziz Ghanemi, Mayumi Yoshioka and Jonny St-Amand
Diseases 2022, 10(4), 80; https://doi.org/10.3390/diseases10040080 - 4 Oct 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3317
Abstract
Obesity represents a medical challenge for modern therapists. The main difficulty is that once obesity is established, it is hard to reverse. It is believed that once an increased body weight/adiposity content is reached it becomes the “reference” that energy mechanisms adjust towards [...] Read more.
Obesity represents a medical challenge for modern therapists. The main difficulty is that once obesity is established, it is hard to reverse. It is believed that once an increased body weight/adiposity content is reached it becomes the “reference” that energy mechanisms adjust towards keeping. Thus, following a weight loss, such as following liposuction/bariatric surgery, the metabolic balance would target this “reference” that represents the previously reached body weight/adiposity content. On the other hand, medical procedures of liposuction and bariatric surgery reduce the level of the adipocytes-produced hormone leptin. This leptin level reduction leads to an increase in food intake and a decrease in energy expenditure. Therefore, the reduced leptin would be among the signals received by the brain to trigger weight regain via processes aiming to re-establish the pre-liposuction/pre-bariatric surgery body weight or adiposity content. We suggest administering leptin so that the brain does not detect the post- liposuction/post-bariatric surgery weight loss; thus, limiting the signals toward weight regain, leading to a better weight control. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Relationship between Nutrition and Diseases 2.0)
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8 pages, 687 KiB  
Opinion
In Vitro Mimicking of Obesity-Induced Biochemical Environment to Study Obesity Impacts on Cells and Tissues
by Abdelaziz Ghanemi, Mayumi Yoshioka and Jonny St-Amand
Diseases 2022, 10(4), 76; https://doi.org/10.3390/diseases10040076 - 3 Oct 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2734
Abstract
Obesity represents a heavy burden for modern healthcare. The main challenge facing obesity research progress is the unknown underlying pathways, which limits our understanding of the pathogenesis and developing therapies. Obesity induces specific biochemical environments that impact the different cells and tissues. In [...] Read more.
Obesity represents a heavy burden for modern healthcare. The main challenge facing obesity research progress is the unknown underlying pathways, which limits our understanding of the pathogenesis and developing therapies. Obesity induces specific biochemical environments that impact the different cells and tissues. In this piece of writing, we suggest mimicking obesity-induced in vivo biochemical environments including pH, lipids, hormones, cytokines, and glucose within an in vitro environment. The concept is to reproduce such biochemical environments and use them to treat the tissue cultures, explant cultures, and cell cultures of different biological organs. This will allow us to clarify how the obesity-induced biochemistry impacts such biological entities. It would also be important to try different environments, in terms of the compositions and concentrations of the constitutive elements, in order to establish links between the effects (impaired regeneration, cellular inflammation, etc.) and the factors constituting the environment (hormones, cytokines, etc.) as well as to reveal dose-dependent effects. We believe that such approaches will allow us to elucidate obesity mechanisms, optimize animal models, and develop therapies as well as novel tissue engineering applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Relationship between Nutrition and Diseases 2.0)
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