Editor’s Choice Articles

Editor’s Choice articles are based on recommendations by the scientific editors of MDPI journals from around the world. Editors select a small number of articles recently published in the journal that they believe will be particularly interesting to readers, or important in the respective research area. The aim is to provide a snapshot of some of the most exciting work published in the various research areas of the journal.

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23 pages, 3213 KiB  
Article
Seasonal to Multi-Decadal Shoreline Change on a Reef-Fringed Beach
by Thibault Laigre, Yann Balouin, Deborah Villarroel-Lamb and Ywenn De La Torre
Coasts 2023, 3(3), 240-262; https://doi.org/10.3390/coasts3030015 - 01 Sep 2023
Viewed by 1028
Abstract
This study investigates the shoreline dynamics of a Caribbean reef-lined beach by utilizing a long-term satellite dataset spanning 75 years and a short-term, high-frequency dataset captured by a fixed camera over 3 years. An array of statistical methods, including ARIMA models, are employed [...] Read more.
This study investigates the shoreline dynamics of a Caribbean reef-lined beach by utilizing a long-term satellite dataset spanning 75 years and a short-term, high-frequency dataset captured by a fixed camera over 3 years. An array of statistical methods, including ARIMA models, are employed to examine the impact of storms and potential cyclical influences on the shoreline dynamics. The findings indicate that significant storm events trigger a substantial retreat of the vegetation limit, followed by a slow recovery. Given the current frequency of such major events, complete recovery may take several decades, resulting in a minor influence of cyclones on the long-term erosion trend, which remains moderate. The short-term shoreline evolution is primarily driven by the annual cyclicity of the still water level, which generates an annual oscillation—an insight not previously reported. In the context of climate change, alterations to sea-level rise and cyclone frequency could disrupt the observed dynamic equilibrium at different timescales. Such changes could result in an alteration of existing cyclicities, disturbance of recovery periods, increased long-term shoreline retreat rates, and potentially affect overall coastal resilience over time. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Measuring Shoreline Variability and Understanding It's Local Impacts)
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15 pages, 3248 KiB  
Article
Automated Technique for Identification of Prominent Nearshore Sandbars
by Nicole Zuck, Laura Kerr and Jon Miller
Coasts 2023, 3(2), 145-159; https://doi.org/10.3390/coasts3020009 - 26 May 2023
Viewed by 1259
Abstract
Nearshore sandbars are common features along sandy coasts. However, identifying sandbars within a beach profile traditionally requires a large historical dataset or subjective input from an observer. Several existing methodologies rely on reference profiles, which is problematic for new study sites with limited [...] Read more.
Nearshore sandbars are common features along sandy coasts. However, identifying sandbars within a beach profile traditionally requires a large historical dataset or subjective input from an observer. Several existing methodologies rely on reference profiles, which is problematic for new study sites with limited data sets and for nourished beaches that have drastic fluctuations in the cross-shore. This novel technique is suitable for beaches where a reference profile does not exist, as it identifies morphological sandbar features by a quantitative automated process. The technique identifies sandbars with a minimum steepness of 2% grade and a minimum height of 0.2 m. The morphological boundaries of sandbars were previously not well-defined, especially the seaward limit of the sandbar, contributing to difficulty in comparing surveys and sandbar morphologies. This technique standardizes the definitions of the bar limits mathematically via standard MATLAB functions, thus removing subjectivity and allowing results to be replicated. Bar identification is focused on the beach profile below the mean high water line, not cross on-shore positions, making the technique appropriate for nourished shorelines as well as those with large seasonal fluctuations. The automated technique was tested on 840 profiles collected near a recently completed beach nourishment project in Long Branch, NJ, USA. Results indicate success in identifying prominent sandbars within the test data set. Full article
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29 pages, 4887 KiB  
Article
Mapping Social-Ecological-Oriented Dried Fish Value Chain: Evidence from Coastal Communities of Odisha and West Bengal in India
by Sisir Kanta Pradhan, Prateep Kumar Nayak and C. Emdad Haque
Coasts 2023, 3(1), 45-73; https://doi.org/10.3390/coasts3010004 - 20 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3461
Abstract
The production and trade of dried fish are important sources of livelihood and employment for poor people engaged in the dried fish value chain. More importantly, half of them are women. Dried fish makes a significant contribution to the food and nutrition security [...] Read more.
The production and trade of dried fish are important sources of livelihood and employment for poor people engaged in the dried fish value chain. More importantly, half of them are women. Dried fish makes a significant contribution to the food and nutrition security of the poor because it is high in calcium and other vital micronutrients. Despite its importance, work on the dried fish value chain (DFVC) continues to focus on financial value creation and linear interactions among market actors that impede the recognition of human rights, justice, food security, and power across the entire value chain. Such a neoclassical perspective on DFVC tends to undermine the complex human-nature interactions that are contingent upon specific histories, people, places, and practices. Poor fishers and dried fish processors placed at the extractive end of the value chain hold low power in the market and remain vulnerable to changing social-ecological system dynamics. The recent work on a hybrid framework of social-ecological system-oriented dried fish value chain (SESDFVC) makes a departure from the conventional dried fish value chain framework. It values dynamic resource contexts, considers upstream actors as active collaborators, and expands the notion of value to include the social-ecological wellbeing of the value chain actors. This paper, with a mixed method research framework, provides an empirical outlook of the dried fish value chain in relation to SES attributes in the context of the eastern Indian coast of the Bay of Bengal, including Odisha and West Bengal, India. Full article
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51 pages, 13124 KiB  
Article
Ecological and Cultural Understanding as a Basis for Management of a Globally Significant Island Landscape
by Kim E. Walker, Claudia Baldwin, Gabriel C. Conroy, Grahame Applegate, Clare Archer-Lean, Angela H. Arthington, Linda Behrendorff, Ben L. Gilby, Wade Hadwen, Christopher J. Henderson, Chris Jacobsen, David Lamb, Scott N. Lieske, Steven M. Ogbourne, Andrew D. Olds, Liz Ota, Joachim Ribbe, Susan Sargent, Vikki Schaffer, Thomas A. Schlacher, Nicholas Stevens, Sanjeev K. Srivastava, Michael A. Weston and Aaron M. Ellisonadd Show full author list remove Hide full author list
Coasts 2022, 2(3), 152-202; https://doi.org/10.3390/coasts2030009 - 12 Jul 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 5662
Abstract
Islands provide the opportunity to explore management regimes and research issues related to the isolation, uniqueness, and integrity of ecological systems. K’gari (Fraser Island) is an Australian World Heritage property listed based on its outstanding natural value, specifically, the unique wilderness characteristics and [...] Read more.
Islands provide the opportunity to explore management regimes and research issues related to the isolation, uniqueness, and integrity of ecological systems. K’gari (Fraser Island) is an Australian World Heritage property listed based on its outstanding natural value, specifically, the unique wilderness characteristics and the diversity of ecosystem types. Our goal was to draw on an understanding of the natural and cultural environment of K’gari as a foundation on which to build a management model that includes First Nations Peoples in future management and research. Our research involved an analysis of papers in the peer-reviewed scientific literature, original reports, letters, and other manuscripts now housed in the K’gari Fraser Island Research Archive. The objectives of the research were: (1) to review key historical events that form the cultural, social, and environmental narrative; (2) review the major natural features of the island and threats; (3) identify the gaps in research; (4) analyse the management and conservation challenges associated with tourism, biosecurity threats, vegetation management practices, and climate change and discuss whether the requirements for sustaining island ecological integrity can be met in the future; and (5) identify commonalities and general management principles that may apply globally to other island systems and other World Heritage sites listed on the basis of their unique natural and cultural features. We found that the characteristics that contribute to island uniqueness are also constraints for research funding and publication; however, they are important themes that warrant more investment. Our review suggests that K’gari is a contested space between tourist visitation and associated environmental impacts, with an island that has rich First Nations history, extraordinary ecological diversity, and breathtaking aesthetic beauty. This juxtaposition is reflected in disparate views of custodianship and use, and the management strategies are needed to achieve multiple objectives in an environmentally sustainable way whilst creating cultural equity in modern times. We offer a foundation on which to build a co-management model that includes First Nations Peoples in governance, management, research, and monitoring. Full article
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