Special Issue "Long-Term Monitoring Tools for Historical Buildings and Heritage Sites in Times of Climate Change"

A special issue of Climate (ISSN 2225-1154).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Lavinia de Ferri
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Collection Management, Museum of Cultural History, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway
Interests: historical buildings; wood; stone; risk assessment; climate change; Non-destructive technique; adaptive capacity; sites management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The efforts constantly put into the preservation of monumental buildings and sites are fundamental for the transferring of cultural backgrounds (history, art, architecture, traditions, politics, religion, etc.) to future generations.

In recent decades, alterations of climate conditions have been observed all over the world with dramatic consequences on many aspects of the society. This has influenced governments’ priorities, including those regarding the conservation of historical buildings and monumental sites.

The fast evolution of climate conditions is affecting the deterioration rates of structures just as quickly, and is completely introducing new degradation phenomena, or new in relation to the geographical area. The reasons must be found in the seasonal and daily variations of environmental parameters, which in turn, for example, affect the movement/migration of water through the capillary structures of building materials and consequently of salts and other dissolved compounds.

In many countries, historical buildings also host museum collections, therefore the correct maintenance of structures is fundamental to guarantee the health of exposed and/or stored artworks, which involve the most different materials, each of them necessitating specific climate conditions. In other cases, the historical buildings underwent further changes in their intended use, for example becoming institutional headquarters, libraries, universities, archives, etc. This means that all of these structures experienced refurbishment interventions to combine the conservation of original structures (and often of the related decorations) within the new building scope and the consequent comfort of the workers/ visitors.

Most of the times, heating systems are used to control both temperature and relative humidity conditions in the cold season, while only the bigger or newer institutions work, including in their design ad hoc heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems (HVAC). Studies carried out in recent decades clearly demonstrated that there is not one single optimal solution for all the situations, and researchers need to carefully study the actual long-term environmental conditions before planning micro/macro climate control systems.

This volume aims to update the community about the most recent studies on the impact of the environment on the conservation of historical buildings and monumental sites. The focus is not only on the documentation of ongoing detrimental effects, but also on the methodologies applied for conducting surveys and assessing the conditions of structures.

Topics of interest to be considered:

  1. The long and short term monitoring of historical buildings/monumental/archaeological sites;
  2. The investigation of decay mechanisms occurring on historical structures;
  3. Evaluation of strategies for the monitoring of climate in historical buildings and of the early stage detection of induced damages;
  4. Climate assessment for the conservation of museums’ collections;
  5. Refurbishment of historical buildings and climate-related issues.

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Climate is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Historical buildings
  • museum environment
  • archaeological/monumental sites
  • climate/microclimate monitoring
  • decay/alteration mechanisms
  • risk assessment
  • refurbishment projects

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Historic Climate in Heritage Building and Standard 15757: Proposal for a Common Nomenclature
Climate 2022, 10(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/cli10010004 - 06 Jan 2022
Viewed by 80
Abstract
Research on the relationship between microclimate and heritage buildings or historic buildings has increased dramatically in the last few decades. Research has focused on indoor climate or indoor microclimate or the environment or micro-environment, and the field of these studies regards several variables, [...] Read more.
Research on the relationship between microclimate and heritage buildings or historic buildings has increased dramatically in the last few decades. Research has focused on indoor climate or indoor microclimate or the environment or micro-environment, and the field of these studies regards several variables, physical—air temperature, air speed, relative humidity—or chemical, dust, CO2, pollution, etc., all of which can have an effect or damage buildings or artifacts inside buildings. Moreover, all these variables should be monitored in a monitoring campaign following the standard EN 15757; in spite of this, scientific literature contains mistakes with regard to the words and objects of study. In this short contribution, the author proposes a common nomenclature in the research field of climate and microclimate in heritage buildings and heritage artifacts. A new nomenclature should be useful for the community of heritage scientists working on preventive measures to distinguish between climate and environment, or the object of study, e.g., the room (wall, wood structure, fresco, etc.) where the artifacts are or the air around them (painting, canvas, statue, piece of furniture, documents, books, etc.). Full article
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Article
Effects of Climate Change on the Future of Heritage Buildings: Case Study and Applied Methodology
Climate 2021, 9(8), 132; https://doi.org/10.3390/cli9080132 - 23 Aug 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1088
Abstract
Heritage buildings and the precious artworks contained therein, represent inestimable cultural and artistic evidence from the past that must be properly preserved for future generations. In the last decades, climate change has gained relevance and is becoming crucial to assess the building performance [...] Read more.
Heritage buildings and the precious artworks contained therein, represent inestimable cultural and artistic evidence from the past that must be properly preserved for future generations. In the last decades, climate change has gained relevance and is becoming crucial to assess the building performance under such effect to provide timely mitigation actions to preserve our cultural heritage. In this regard, this paper outlines a method that combines different experimental activities and tools to forecast possible future risks due to climate change for the conservation of the artworks and provide its application in a relevant case study in Italy, the Duomo di Milano. In detail, the suggested method consists of the monitoring of the building indoor climate to validate a simulation model, defining possible future scenarios based on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) projections, and evaluation of the future conservation risks of the main artworks. The results of the analysis carried out, show that for some artworks (e.g., stone sculptures, some organic materials, etc.), the conservation conditions will not worsen compared to the current situation, while for others (e.g., paintings, wooden objects, etc.) the risk of deterioration is expected to increase substantially. This study helps to understand how the future climate can affect the indoor environment of a huge masonry building and allow to plan targeted mitigation strategies aimed to reduce the future risks. Full article
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