Biomass-Based Green Technologies for Modern Bioeconomy

A special issue of Clean Technologies (ISSN 2571-8797).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 October 2023) | Viewed by 2651

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. College of Engineering, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070, China
2. College of Horticulture and Forestry Science, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070, China
Interests: cellulose; lignin; biopolymers; biomass conversion; agriculture nanobiotechnology; agriculture carbon sequestration
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Guest Editor
State Key Laboratory of Pulp and Paper Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641, China
Interests: development and application research of specialty paper; biomass-based functional materials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

Lignocellulosic biomass represents green, renewable, and sustainable feedstock for next-generation advanced manufacturing, which has enabled the massive replacement of traditional petroleum-derived products that build up the foundation of a modern bioeconomy. Current biomass-related technologies include feedstock design, biorefining, manufacturing, waste handling, waste valorization, etc., which have generated green and sustainable products of bio-energies, biofuels, chemicals, biomaterials, and multifunctional devices. Meanwhile, the field still faces challenges in implementing biorefinery and industrializing these bioproducts because of the difficulties in reaching product quality, cost-effectiveness, processing optimization, and net carbon footprint. In this Special Issue, we aim to collect recent advancements in green technologies that use biomass as the feedstock to achieve a modern bioeconomy. The covered topics include: 

  1. Biomass feedstock design and development;
  2. Biofuels and bioenergy;
  3. Biomass-derived advanced multifunctional materials and devices;
  4. Biomass-derived nanomaterials, such as nanocellulose and nanolignin;
  5. Cellulose-, hemicellulose-, and lignin-derived chemicals and products;
  6. Biomass-derived plastic alternatives;
  7. Technology, processing, devices, and equipment developments for efficient biomass conversion;
  8. Life cycle, economic, and sustainability assessment of biomass-derived products.

Prof. Dr. Qiang Li
Prof. Dr. Rendang Yang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • biomass feedstock design and development
  • biofuels and bioenergy
  • biomass-derived advanced multifunctional materials and devices
  • biomass-derived nanomaterials like nanocellulose and nanolignin
  • cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin-derived chemicals and products
  • biomass-derived plastic alternatives
  • technology, processing, devices, and equipment developments for efficient biomass conversion
  • life cycle, economic, and sustainability assessment of biomass-derived products

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

18 pages, 1522 KiB  
Article
A Green Approach to Valorizing Abundant Aquatic Weeds for Nutrient-Rich Edible Paper Sheets Production in Bangladesh
by Sharmin Suraiya, Suraiya Afrin Bristy, Md. Sadek Ali, Anusree Biswas, Md. Rasal Ali and Monjurul Haq
Clean Technol. 2023, 5(4), 1269-1286; https://doi.org/10.3390/cleantechnol5040064 - 23 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1990
Abstract
The rapid and unprecedented expansion of the global population highlights concerns about the sufficiency of food resources to sustain this growth. This study investigates and substantiates the feasibility of renewable food resources in order to meet the nutritional requirements of consumers. Three edible [...] Read more.
The rapid and unprecedented expansion of the global population highlights concerns about the sufficiency of food resources to sustain this growth. This study investigates and substantiates the feasibility of renewable food resources in order to meet the nutritional requirements of consumers. Three edible aquatic weeds, helencha (Enhydra fluctuans), malancha (Alternanthera philoxeroides), and kalmi (Ipomoea aquatica), were used to produce edible paper sheets. The composition of the raw aquatic weeds and paper sheet samples was analyzed, including the proximate composition, amino acid content, minerals and heavy metal contents, and bioactive compounds. The dried raw aquatic weeds and paper sheets showed similar proximate compositions, with carbohydrates being the highest component (50.38–64.63%), followed by crude protein (15.25–19.13%), ash (9.30–15.88%), and lipid (1.55–3.43%). The raw weeds and paper sheets were rich in essential minerals like Na, Ca, and Zn with contents ranging from 27.7 mg/100 g to 30.4 mg/100 g, 126.8 mg/100 g to 489.65 mg/100 g, and 4.5 mg/100 g to 16.3 mg/100 g, respectively. Acceptable levels of heavy metals, including Ni, Pb, and Cu, were found. The paper sheets contained seven essential and eight non-essential amino acids. Among the essential amino acids, the phenylalanine content was the highest at 2735.9 mg/100 g in E. fluctuans paper sheets, followed by methionine at 2377.29 mg/100 g in the raw E. fluctuans and histidine at 1972.6 mg/100 g in E. fluctuans paper sheets. A. philoxeroides sheets showed the highest total amino acid content (16,146.81 mg/100 g), while I. aquatica showed the lowest (13,118.67 mg/100 g). The aquatic weed paper sheets were rich in bioactive compounds, and the numbers in E. fluctuans, A. philoxeroides, and I. aquatica paper sheets were 31, 33, and 40, respectively. There were no significant changes in the nutritional content of the aquatic weeds in paper sheet form compared with the raw weeds, which suggests promising prospects for their production and consumption as a source of nutrition and bioactive compounds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomass-Based Green Technologies for Modern Bioeconomy)
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