Special Issue "Dynamic Structure, Surface Properties and Reactivity of Catalytic Systems for Energy Conversion and Storage"

A special issue of Catalysts (ISSN 2073-4344). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Catalysis".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 July 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Ioannis Zegkinoglou
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute for Experimental Physics IV, Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universitätsstrasse 150, 44801 Bochum, Germany
Interests: energy science; surface and interface science; X-ray spectroscopy; nanocatalysis; condensed matter physics; synchrotron research; in situ and operando characterization

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The development through rational design of highly active, selective and stable catalysts for affordable and sustainable energy conversion and storage requires being able to correlate the macroscopic catalytic performance of a material to physicochemical properties at the molecular and atomic level under reaction conditions. Optimizing the surface morphology, structure, elemental composition, chemical state and electronic properties of an electrocatalytic or heterogeneous catalysis system at its interface with the surrounding liquid- or gas-phase environment (that involves reactants, organic solvents, electrolytes etc.) can facilitate the tuning of the catalytic reaction mechanism and kinetics, increase the abundance of catalytically active sites, lower the energy requirements of the reaction (with respect to temperature, pressure or electrochemical potential) and slow down the deactivation or structural deterioration of the catalyst.

This Special Issue aims at covering recent advances in the field of catalyst characterization and optimization under reaction-relevant environmental conditions, particularly for applications in the energy science field, including but not limited to carbon dioxide conversion, photocatalytic water splitting, hydrogen evolution reaction, fuel cell and battery research etc. Spectroscopic, microscopic and scattering-based characterization methods that allow in situ and operando probing of the dynamic nature of the catalysts’ properties during the reaction, such as ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy, in situ optical spectroscopy, environmental X-ray diffraction, high pressure and liquid phase scanning probe and electron microscopy, along with computational approaches that complement such studies, are particularly in focus.

Dr. Ioannis Zegkinoglou
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Catalysts is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • heterogeneous catalysis
  • in situ spectroscopy
  • in situ microscopy
  • operando characterization
  • energy conversion
  • energy storage
  • surface and interface science
  • nanoscience

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Influence of the ZrO2 Crystalline Phases on the Nature of Active Sites in PdCu/ZrO2 Catalysts for the Methanol Steam Reforming Reaction—An In Situ Spectroscopic Study
Catalysts 2020, 10(9), 1005; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal10091005 - 02 Sep 2020
Viewed by 888
Abstract
In this work, the electronic properties of the metal sites in cubic and monoclinic ZrO2 supported Pd and PdCu catalysts have been investigated using CO as probe molecule in in-situ IR studies, and the surface composition of the outermost layers has been [...] Read more.
In this work, the electronic properties of the metal sites in cubic and monoclinic ZrO2 supported Pd and PdCu catalysts have been investigated using CO as probe molecule in in-situ IR studies, and the surface composition of the outermost layers has been studied by APXPS (Ambient Pressure X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy). The reaction products were followed by mass spectrometry, making it possible to relate the chemical properties of the catalysts under reaction conditions with their selectivity. Combining these techniques, it has been shown that the structure of the support (monoclinic or cubic ZrO2) affects the metal dispersion, mobility, and reorganization of metal sites under methanol steam reforming (MSR) conditions, influencing the oxidation state of surface metal species, with important consequences in the catalytic activity. Correlating the mass spectra of the reaction products with these spectroscopic studies, it was possible to conclude that electropositive metal species play an imperative role for high CO2 and H2 selectivity in the MSR reaction (less CO formation). Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview
In Situ TEM Studies of Catalysts Using Windowed Gas Cells
Catalysts 2020, 10(7), 779; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal10070779 - 12 Jul 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1236
Abstract
For decades, differentially pumped environmental transmission electron microscopy has been a powerful tool to study dynamic structural evolution of catalysts under a gaseous environment. With the advancement of micro-electromechanical system-based technologies, windowed gas cell became increasingly popular due to its ability to achieve [...] Read more.
For decades, differentially pumped environmental transmission electron microscopy has been a powerful tool to study dynamic structural evolution of catalysts under a gaseous environment. With the advancement of micro-electromechanical system-based technologies, windowed gas cell became increasingly popular due to its ability to achieve high pressure and its compatibility to a wide range of microscopes with minimal modification. This enables a series of imaging and analytical technologies such as atomic resolution imaging, spectroscopy, and operando, revealing details that were unprecedented before. By reviewing some of the recent work, we demonstrate that the windowed gas cell has the unique ability to solve complicated catalysis problems. We also discuss what technical difficulties need to be addressed and provide an outlook for the future of in situ environmental transmission electron microscopy (TEM) technologies and their application to the field of catalysis development. Full article
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