Special Issue "Novel Photocatalysts for Decomposition of Organic and Inorganic Pollutants"

A special issue of Catalysts (ISSN 2073-4344). This special issue belongs to the section "Photocatalysis".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Katarzyna Siwińska-Ciesielczyk
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Guest Editor
Poznan University of Technology, Faculty of Chemical Technology, Institute of Chemical Technology and Engineering, Berdychowo 4, PL-60965 Poznan, Poland
Interests: titanium dioxide; titania-based multicomponent oxide and hybrid systems; surface chemistry; inorganic pigments; photocatalysts; photocatalysis; electrode materials; environmental protection
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Dr. Marcin Janczarek
Website
Co-Guest Editor
Poznan University of Technology, Faculty of Chemical Technology, Institute of Chemical Technology and Engineering, Berdychowo 4, PL-60965 Poznan, Poland
Interests: photocatalysis, nanomaterials, faceted nanoparticles, solar energy, advanced oxidation technologies
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is dedicated to new trends in research focused on synthesis of novel materials used in the degradation of organic and inorganic pollutants.

The increasing concentration of industrial waste, which is a major threat to the natural environment and living organisms, imposes the necessity to develop methods for their removal or neutralization. It is well known that removal of organic and inorganic pollutants by conventional physicochemical and biochemical methods, such as adsorption, oxidation, ozonation, membrane separation, coagulation, and flocculation, is expensive and ineffective. That is why, in recent years, an increased interest in new wastewater treatment technologies which are based on heterogeneous semiconductor photocatalysis can be observed. This fact is confirmed by the growing number of literature reports regarding the technology of materials, which, when used under appropriate conditions, exhibit the ability to decompose some of the chemicals that are often hazardous to human life and animals. The photocatalytic degradation of pollutants in air and water, carried out in the presence of semiconductor materials, creates new, more effective possibilities of removing pollutants (detergents, pharmaceuticals, pesticides, organic dyes, metal ions, etc.) from the natural environment. Moreover, photocatalytic degradation process is a very promising method of removing contaminants due to low costs and mild operating conditions (temperature and pressure). It is well known that photocatalysts play a fundamental role in the photocatalysis process. There are many semiconductor materials available on the market used in the photocatalysis process; however, there is a constant drive to obtain new materials which would be highly active in the visible and near ultraviolet range, biologically inert, photostable (nonphotocorrosive), resistant to environmental conditions in which they are used, and relatively cheap. Many research centers around the world are conducting studies focused on the development of an effective production method of photocatalytic materials with unique physicochemical properties, including a specific phase composition, crystallite size or BET surface area, which determine their high and constantly growing popularity in many fields of technology. The physicochemical properties of photocatalysts, such as morphology, crystalline structure, crystallite size or textural properties, depend strictly on the selection of their synthesis method and the final thermal treatment.

The proposed scope of this Special Issue includes:

  • Synthesis of novel photocatalysts;
  • Surface treatment and enhancement of photocatalyss properties (modification/grafting/doping/immobilization),
  • Surface chemistry and functionality,
  • Physicochemical characterization of photocatalysts,
  • degradation of harmful inorganic and/or organic pollutants (for example: metal ions, detergents, pesticides, pharmaceuticals, organic dyes, etc.) using novel, synthesized photocatalysts.
Dr. Katarzyna Siwińska-Ciesielczyk
Dr. Marcin Janczarek
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Catalysts is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Heterogeneous photocatalysis
  • UV and visible-light active photocatalysts
  • Organic impurities
  • Inorganic pollutants
  • Surface chemistry
  • Morphological and chemical modification
  • Characterization techniques
  • Environmental protection
  • Water and air contamination

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Synthesis of Titanium Dioxide via Surfactant-Assisted Microwave Method for Photocatalytic and Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Applications
Catalysts 2020, 10(5), 586; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal10050586 - 23 May 2020
Abstract
In this study, titania nanoparticles were obtained using the microwave-assisted technique. Moreover, different surfactants (PEG (Mn = 400), Pluronic P123 and Triton X−100) were used during the synthesis in order to determine their impact on the crystallinity and morphology of the final [...] Read more.
In this study, titania nanoparticles were obtained using the microwave-assisted technique. Moreover, different surfactants (PEG (Mn = 400), Pluronic P123 and Triton X−100) were used during the synthesis in order to determine their impact on the crystallinity and morphology of the final products. Subsequently, techniques such as XRD, SEM and TEM (performed in high contrast and high-resolution mode), diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), low temperature N2 sorption (BET model), FTIR and TGA were carried out. Based on the crystallinity analysis of the obtained materials, it was established that the addition of surfactants results in greater (PEG and Triton X−100) or smaller (Pluronic P123) average crystallite size. The main purpose of this study was to use the synthesized nanomaterials in the photodegradation process (in the UV light range) of the model organic pollutants – phenol (20 mg/L) and etodolac (15 mg/L). Furthermore, it was also pointed out that the dye-sensitized solar cells can be a second application for the synthesized titania nanomaterials. The photo-oxidation and photovoltaic tests have shown that the titanium dioxide obtained using the surfactant-assisted microwave method is characterized not only by better photodegradation efficiency of phenol and etodolac, but also by higher photocurrent density compared to the reference titania samples—the pristine TiO2 and commercial P25. Full article
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