Special Issue "Race, Ethnicity, and Drug Addiction"

A special issue of Behavioral Sciences (ISSN 2076-328X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2016).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Karen McElrath, Ph.D.
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Criminal Justice, Fayetteville State University, 1200 Murchison Road, Fayetteville, NC 28301, USA
Interests: opioid dependence; treatment barriers; novel/emerging psychoactive drugs; HIV/HCV prevention

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Behavioral Sciences is currently publishing manuscripts for a Special Issue on race, ethnicity, and drug addiction. This Special Issue will include articles that draw on a range of theoretical and methodological perspectives that will contribute to our understanding about drug addiction among diverse racial and ethnic groups. We welcome articles that utilize quantitative, qualitative, or mixed-method approaches. Given the focus of the journal, we anticipate that several articles will reflect psychological perspectives. However, we also encourage the submission of articles that draw on multidisciplinary work or integrate individual and structural factors in studies of race, ethnicity, and addiction. Articles that focus on measurement or research design as they relate to race, ethnicity, and addiction would also be of special interest. All articles are subject to peer review. For further information, please contact Karen McElrath, Ph.D. ([email protected]).

Karen McElrath, Ph.D.
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Behavioral Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • drug addiction
  • race/ethnicity
  • patterns and trajectories of drug use/addiction
  • prevention and treatment
  • relapse and recovery
  • drug policy and law
  • drug addiction and incarceration
  • health risks and drug addiction
  • dual diagnosis
  • stigma

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
NADA Ear Acupuncture: An Adjunctive Therapy to Improve and Maintain Positive Outcomes in Substance Abuse Treatment
Behav. Sci. 2017, 7(2), 37; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs7020037 - 16 Jun 2017
Cited by 3
Abstract
The National Acupuncture Detoxification Association protocol (NADA) is an adjunctive therapy using 1 to 5 invariant ear acupuncture/acupressure points. This is a randomized prospective study to determine if NADA plus traditional treatment enhance outcomes: quality of life, depression, anxiety and abstinence from substance [...] Read more.
The National Acupuncture Detoxification Association protocol (NADA) is an adjunctive therapy using 1 to 5 invariant ear acupuncture/acupressure points. This is a randomized prospective study to determine if NADA plus traditional treatment enhance outcomes: quality of life, depression, anxiety and abstinence from substance abuse. There were 100 patients enrolled in the Keystone Substance Abuse Services-Winthrop University Department of Sociology and Anthropology NADA study. All patients completed Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale (GAD-7), Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire (Q-LES) prior to starting the program and at program completion. Patients self-reported alcohol, tobacco, and drug use prior to starting the program at program completion and at 3 and 6 month follow- up. Patient characteristics are predictive of completion versus non-completion when race, criminal history and initial drug test is considered. Those identified as nonwhite, (p < 0.05) and patients with positive initial drug test, (p < 0.01) were more likely to complete treatment in the NADA group. Also, among patients with criminal history a higher percentage failed to complete the program in the control group (p < 0.05). Participation in NADA positively associated with Q-LES score (p < 0.05), feeling better about oneself and improved energy (p < 0.05), likelihood of employment upon discharge (p < 0.05), and decreased alcohol use at 3 month follow up (p < 0.05) and 6-month follow-up (p < 0.01). NADA group reported less tobacco use at 6 months (p < 0.05). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Race, Ethnicity, and Drug Addiction)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Black–White Disparities in Criminal Justice Referrals to Drug Treatment: Addressing Treatment Need or Expanding the Diagnostic Net?
Behav. Sci. 2016, 6(4), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs6040021 - 02 Oct 2016
Cited by 2
Abstract
Slightly more than half of admissions to U.S. publicly-funded treatment for marijuana use are referred by the criminal justice system; this pattern has remained for at least 20 years. Nationally, Blacks comprise nearly a third of treatment admissions for marijuana use. This article [...] Read more.
Slightly more than half of admissions to U.S. publicly-funded treatment for marijuana use are referred by the criminal justice system; this pattern has remained for at least 20 years. Nationally, Blacks comprise nearly a third of treatment admissions for marijuana use. This article explores the interplay between race and criminal justice referrals to treatment for marijuana use. Using data from the (U.S.) 2011 Treatment Episode Data Set, we examine the relationship between race and diagnosis of cannabis use disorder (dependence versus abuse) among referrals to community-based treatment in North Carolina. We compare Black/White differences in cannabis diagnoses across four referral sources: the criminal justice system, healthcare providers, self, and other sources. Race was significantly related to type of diagnosis across all four referral sources, however, the nature of the relationship was distinctly different among criminal justice referrals with Whites being more likely than Blacks to be diagnosed with cannabis dependence. Moreover, the marijuana use profiles of criminal justice referrals differed substantially from individuals referred by other sources. The findings suggest that diagnoses of cannabis abuse (rather than dependence) may have worked to widen the diagnostic net by “capturing” individuals under control of the criminal justice system who manifested few problems with marijuana use, other than their involvement in the criminal justice system. The potential for a net-widening effect appeared to be most pronounced for Blacks. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Race, Ethnicity, and Drug Addiction)
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