Special Issue "Eating Behaviors"

A special issue of Behavioral Sciences (ISSN 2076-328X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2015).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Paula A. Quatromoni
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Health Sciences, Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA
Interests: studies relating eating behaviors to health or disease outcomes; or studies characterizing eating behaviors of unique or “at risk” populations.

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Eating behavior provides a basis for understanding how diet influences health status and disease risk. However, much of nutritional epidemiology fails to consider eating behavior when categorizing dietary exposures in purely quantitative terms. These categorizations are based on the levels of food and nutrient intake estimated in a population and are often assessed using tools that cannot discern much about eating behaviors. This Special Issue of Behavioral Sciences invites authors to contribute manuscripts on diverse aspects of eating behavior. Most relevant will be those that add to our understanding of eating behavior as either a contributor to or a consequence of health outcomes of interest to practitioners, researchers, educators and clinicians. Studies characterizing eating behaviors of unique or vulnerable populations are also welcome.

Dr. Paula A. Quatromoni
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Behavioral Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.


Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Body Mass Index and Sociodemographic Predictors of School Lunch Purchase Behavior during a Year-Long Environmental Intervention in Middle School
Behav. Sci. 2015, 5(2), 324-340; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs5020324 - 10 Jun 2015
Cited by 2
Abstract
Modifying the school food environment is on the national agenda as one strategy to improve the nutritional quality of children’s diets. Because few environmental-level interventions have been rigorously evaluated, the evidence base to inform programs and policies is limited. Of concern is the [...] Read more.
Modifying the school food environment is on the national agenda as one strategy to improve the nutritional quality of children’s diets. Because few environmental-level interventions have been rigorously evaluated, the evidence base to inform programs and policies is limited. Of concern is the impact that changes to cafeteria offerings will have on participation in school meal programs. This study evaluates school lunch participation in the setting of a year-long middle school cafeteria intervention by examining the association between body mass index (BMI), sociodemographics, and the purchases of school lunch meals. IMOVE meals were healthier choices that met stringent nutritional criteria and were offered alongside standard lunch meals. Students who were overweight had a significantly higher purchase rate for both types of meals compared to those with a healthy BMI. Non-white race, younger age, being male, and low-income status were also significantly associated with participation in school lunch. Results indicate that nutritionally vulnerable students participate in school lunch and are equally likely to buy healthy alternatives or standard meals. This behavioral observation has important implications for school foodservice programs and policies. These results are timely given recent federal legislation to improve the school food environment to influence students’ food choice behaviors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eating Behaviors)
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