Special Issue "Automation in Airborne Wind Energy Systems"

A special issue of Automation (ISSN 2673-4052).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Kelly Cohen
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0070, USA
Interests: collaborative UAV control and task planning; multi-agent decision making; UAV operations for enhanced situational awareness and resource allocation; disaster management using UAVs; UAV flight control design and testing; UAVs for package delivery; estimation and control for feedback aerodynamic flow control; system identification/control of rotorcraft/VTOL aircraft
Dr. Mark Aull
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Windlift, Inc., Morrisville, NC 27560, USA
Interests: Airborne Wind Energy, intelligent systems, robotics, fuzzy logic, vision processing, fault detection

Special Issue Information

Global climate change is one of the most important challenges of our time, neccesitating large-scale adoption of sustainable energy production. Airborne wind energy (AWE) may become a significant contributor to energy production due to reduced material use and installation requirements relative to other methods of harvesting wind energy. However, AWE development faces challenges, many of which result from the increased importance and difficulty of control and automation relative to other forms of wind energy. AWE design is highly integrated and multidisciplinary, including control, electronic, and mechanical disciplines. AWE therefore provides ample prospects for the design, optimization, and integration of advanced automation systems to enable operation, increase performance, reduce design constraints, and increase safety and reliability. The objective of this Special Issue is to compile recent research and development efforts contributing to advances in AWE automation. The Special Issue will also welcome contributions addressing state-of-the-art advances in associated developments and methodologies and perspectives on future developments and applications.

Prof. Dr. Kelly Cohen
Dr. Mark Aull
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Automation is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Sustainable energy
  • Wind energy
  • Airborne wind energy (AWE)
  • Advanced automation systems
  • Automation design for AWE
  • Control for AWE
  • Design and optimization for AWE

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Design Optimization and Sizing for Fly-Gen Airborne Wind Energy Systems
Automation 2020, 1(1), 1-16; https://doi.org/10.3390/automation1010001 - 17 Jun 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1999
Abstract
Traditional on-shore horizontal-axis wind turbines need to be large for both performance reasons (e.g., clearing ground turbulence and reaching higher wind speeds) and for economic reasons (e.g., more efficient land use, lower maintenance costs, and fewer controllers and grid attachments) while their efficiency [...] Read more.
Traditional on-shore horizontal-axis wind turbines need to be large for both performance reasons (e.g., clearing ground turbulence and reaching higher wind speeds) and for economic reasons (e.g., more efficient land use, lower maintenance costs, and fewer controllers and grid attachments) while their efficiency is scale and mass independent. Airborne wind energy (AWE) system efficiency is a function of system size and AWE system operating altitude is less directly coupled to system power rating. This paper derives fly-gen AWE system parameters from small number of design parameters, which are used to optimize a design for energy cost. This paper then scales AWE systems and optimizes them at each scale to determine the relationships between size, efficiency, power output, and cost. The results indicate that physics and economics favor a larger number of small units, at least offshore or where land cost is small. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Automation in Airborne Wind Energy Systems)
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