Special Issue "Atmospheric Applications of Lidar"

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Alain M. Dabas
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
CNRM Centre National de Recherches Meteorologiques, Toulouse, France
Interests: Observation of the atmosphere; remote sensing; lidars; atmospheric dynamics; aerosols; fog

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Using laser beams for atmosphere sounding developed soon after the invention of the laser by T. Maiman in 1960. In 1964, for instance, Fiocco and Grams published an article showing for the first time the detection of aerosol particles in the high atmosphere with a ruby laser. The observation and characterization of aerosols throughout the atmosphere have become common with lidars of growing complexity (multi-wavelengths, polarisation diversity), now often integrated in networks. The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) was launched in 2006 and is still orbiting the earth. Lidar aerosol observations are now used for the forecast of air quality. Doppler lidars were developed in the 80s and 90s for the observation of the wind field in the lower or higher atmosphere. They are now commercially available and widely deployed around the world for the wind energy industry, the surveillance of airports, etc. A wind lidar – the AEOLUS mission – has been recently launched into space. Lidar for the measurement of vertical profiles of temperature, humidity, concentration of gaseous components of the atmosphere have also been built, envisaged for space missions, and improve thanks to the progress made in the laser and detector technologies.

The Special Issue will attempt to give an overview of the latest developments in both the lidar technology and scientific as well as industrial applications for the observation of the atmosphere.

Dr. Alain M. Dabas
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Atmosphere is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Cloud
  • Aerosols
  • Wind
  • Temperature
  • Humidity
  • Atmospheric composition
  • Green-house gases
  • Troposphere
  • Stratosphere
  • Space missions
  • Air quality
  • Weather
  • Climate

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Three-Dimensional Wind Measurements with the Fibered Airborne Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar LIVE
Atmosphere 2019, 10(9), 549; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10090549 - 16 Sep 2019
Abstract
A three-dimensional (3D) wind profiling Lidar, based on the latest high power 1.5 µm fiber laser development at Onera, has been successfully flown on-board a SAFIRE (Service des Avions Français Instrumentés pour la Recherche en Environnement) ATR42 aircraft. The Lidar called LIVE (LIdar [...] Read more.
A three-dimensional (3D) wind profiling Lidar, based on the latest high power 1.5 µm fiber laser development at Onera, has been successfully flown on-board a SAFIRE (Service des Avions Français Instrumentés pour la Recherche en Environnement) ATR42 aircraft. The Lidar called LIVE (LIdar VEnt) is designed to measure wind profiles from the aircraft down to ground level, with a horizontal resolution of 3 km, a vertical resolution of 100 m and a designed accuracy on each three wind vector components better than 0.5 m.s−1. To achieve the required performance, LIVE Lidar emits 410 µJ laser pulses repeating at 14 KHz with a duration of 700 ns and uses a conical scanner of 30° total opening angle and a full scan time of 17 s. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Atmospheric Applications of Lidar)
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Open AccessArticle
Optical Energy Variability Induced by Speckle: The Cases of MERLIN and CHARM-F IPDA Lidar
Atmosphere 2019, 10(9), 540; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10090540 - 11 Sep 2019
Abstract
In the context of the FrenchGerman space lidar mission MERLIN (MEthane Remote LIdar missioN) dedicated to the determination of the atmospheric methane content, an end-to-end mission simulator is being developed. In order to check whether the instrument design meets the performance requirements, simulations [...] Read more.
In the context of the FrenchGerman space lidar mission MERLIN (MEthane Remote LIdar missioN) dedicated to the determination of the atmospheric methane content, an end-to-end mission simulator is being developed. In order to check whether the instrument design meets the performance requirements, simulations have to count all the sources of noise on the measurements like the optical energy variability induced by speckle. Speckle is due to interference as the lidar beam is quasi monochromatic. Speckle contribution to the error budget has to be estimated but also simulated. In this paper, the speckle theory is revisited and applied to MERLIN lidar and also to the DLR (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft und Raumfahrt) demonstrator lidar CHARM-F. Results show: on the signal path, speckle noise depends mainly on the size of the illuminated area on ground; on the solar flux, speckle is fully negligible both because of the pixel size and the optical filter spectral width; on the energy monitoring path a decorrelation mechanism is needed to reduce speckle noise on averaged data. Speckle noises for MERLIN and CHARM-F can be simulated by Gaussian noises with only one random draw by shot separately for energy monitoring and signal paths. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Atmospheric Applications of Lidar)
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