Special Issue "Art, Science and Technology of Human Sexuality"

A special issue of Arts (ISSN 2076-0752). This special issue belongs to the section "Arts and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 October 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Ms. Beibei Song

1. Chief Creative Officer, Song Essinova, LLC, Belmont, CA 94002, USA
2. Editor, Essinova Journal
3. Facilitator and Coach, Executive Education, Stanford Graduate School of Business, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
Website 1 | Website 2 | E-Mail
Interests: creativity; innovation; business; art; management; leadership; science; technology; design; nature
Guest Editor
Dr. Robert Sapolsky

John A. and Cynthia Fry Gunn Professor and Professor of Neurology and of Neurosurgery, School of Humanities & Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: behavior; neurobiology; physiology
Guest Editor
Prof. Clara Boj

Visual Artist, Assistant professor, School of Art, University of Murcia, 30100 Murcia, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: media art; art education; art and science
Guest Editor
Prof. Diego Diaz

New Media Artist, Associate Professor, Department of Industrial Systems Engineering and Design, University Jaume I, Castellón, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: art; science; technology and society; media art

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

With the advent of sexbots, AI and robotics have entered the more intimate domains of human-machine relationship and a highly sensitive cultural territory, now challenging the most primal and elemental aspects of human existence. Granted sex-tech is not new—e-commerce owes much of its early existence to porn—however the latest wave of technologies pushes this part of human experience to yet another edge. A sex robot expert predicts that humans will marry robots in the next 35 years.

Meanwhile, human-to-human marriage rates continue to decline; and assisted reproductive technology is becoming increasingly routine, enabling procreation without a marital or even sexual partner.

While the trinity of “marriage, sex and co-parenting” will continue to dominate for a long time to come, these developments are portending new alternatives, with potentially profound social consequences. They also provide a new context for the examination, expression, celebration and contemplation of human sexuality, from multiple points of view.

From ancient mythology to virtual reality, from feminism to sexology, from Kama Sutra to Ex Machina, from neuroscience and evolutionary biology to behavioral psychology and cultural anthropology… We welcome papers, reviews, images and artworks, etc. from wide-ranging fields and perspectives, on the subject of human sexuality and intimacy.

Ms. Beibei Song
Dr. Robert Sapolsky
Prof. Clara Boj
Prof. Diego Diaz
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Arts is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • art
  • science
  • technology
  • sex
  • sexuality
  • sexology
  • marriage
  • assisted reproductive technology
  • sex therapy
  • gender
  • love
  • reproduction
  • AI
  • robotics
  • porn

Published Papers (3 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-3
Export citation of selected articles as:

Editorial

Jump to: Research, Other

Open AccessEditorial Art, Science, and Technology of Human Sexuality
Received: 28 December 2017 / Revised: 28 January 2018 / Accepted: 29 January 2018 / Published: 5 February 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1066 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In Spring 2017, Abyss Creations, a 20-year old manufacturer of hyper-realistic sex dolls (trade-named “RealDoll”) with a loyal customer base, launched an artificial intelligence app (named “Harmony”) to augment the dolls’ already life-like bodies, giving them customizable personalities and allowing them to flirt
[...] Read more.
In Spring 2017, Abyss Creations, a 20-year old manufacturer of hyper-realistic sex dolls (trade-named “RealDoll”) with a loyal customer base, launched an artificial intelligence app (named “Harmony”) to augment the dolls’ already life-like bodies, giving them customizable personalities and allowing them to flirt and converse with their owners[...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Art, Science and Technology of Human Sexuality)
Figures

Figure 1

Research

Jump to: Editorial, Other

Open AccessArticle Partner Pen Play in Parallel (PPPiP): A New PPPiParadigm for Relationship Improvement
Received: 28 May 2018 / Revised: 16 July 2018 / Accepted: 8 August 2018 / Published: 13 August 2018
PDF Full-text (5057 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Healthy romantic relationships contribute to human physical health and emotional well-being. Technologies that catalyze human sexuality such as silicone sex toys and video-conferencing are increasingly common today, and disruptive sexological artifacts such as sexbots are speculated to eventually compete directly with human-human sexuality.
[...] Read more.
Healthy romantic relationships contribute to human physical health and emotional well-being. Technologies that catalyze human sexuality such as silicone sex toys and video-conferencing are increasingly common today, and disruptive sexological artifacts such as sexbots are speculated to eventually compete directly with human-human sexuality. The consequences of these evolutionary transitions in human sociosexual behavior are entirely unknown at the individual or collective scale. Here we introduce Partner Pen Play in Parallel (PPPiP), the act of simultaneous improvisational drawing on paper without clinical supervision. In this prospective article we sketch out what PPPiP is, then provide interdisciplinary evidence from art therapy, sexology, affective neuroscience, and aesthetics to support PPPiP as a useful strategy for relationship development. PPPiP combines the advantages of individuated artistic practice with the established frameworks of improvisation and dyadic relationship interventions. Relative to traditional art therapy practices, PPPiP is less clinically oriented, features fewer external constraints, and directly encourages the dynamic integration of artistic creation with relationship co-creation. PPPiP emphasizes the importance of narrative structure and controlled novelty at multiple scales in intimate partnerships, connecting art therapy practices more directly to recent neuropsychological research. Evidence from brain imaging in improvisational and aesthetic contexts supports a model in which PPPiP synergistically activates motor and cortico-limbic neural circuits associated with skilled emotive-creative processes. PPPiP thus represents a transdisciplinary answer to the question of what will we carry from our sociosexual past towards a healthier textosexual future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Art, Science and Technology of Human Sexuality)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Other

Jump to: Editorial, Research

Open AccessOpinion Re: Sex-Bots—Let Us Look before We Leap
Received: 2 January 2018 / Revised: 12 March 2018 / Accepted: 12 March 2018 / Published: 10 April 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (172 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
With the understanding that a substantial commerce in sexually-enabled robots represents a plunge into the unknown for humankind, and at the “deep end of the pool”—i.e., involving one of the most important, complex, and problem-ridden aspects of human existence—it is the goal of
[...] Read more.
With the understanding that a substantial commerce in sexually-enabled robots represents a plunge into the unknown for humankind, and at the “deep end of the pool”—i.e., involving one of the most important, complex, and problem-ridden aspects of human existence—it is the goal of this brief opinion piece to help ensure that we remain aware as a society of some of the potential pitfalls—these, as is quite appropriate for an opinion piece of this kind, illustrated via negative but plausible scenarios—and presented as well in the light of the multi-dimensional aspect of human sexuality; and with the reality of a certain level of risk associated with sex-bots having been established, there are presented in conclusion some potentially strategic considerations for those professionals who find themselves involved with their design, production, and/or marketing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Art, Science and Technology of Human Sexuality)
Back to Top