Special Issue "Business, Open Innovation and Art"

Special Issue Editors

Ms. Beibei Song
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
1. Chief Creative Officer, Song Essinova, LLC, Belmont, CA 94002, USA
2. Editor, Essinova Journal
3. Facilitator and Coach, Executive Education, Stanford Graduate School of Business, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
Interests: creativity; innovation; business; art; management; leadership; science; technology; design; nature
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Piero Formica
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Senior Research Fellow, Innovation Value Institute, Maynooth University, Maynooth, Co Kildare, Ireland
2. Founder, International Entrepreneurship Academy Network
3. Adjunct Professor of Knowledge Economics, Innovation and Entrepreneurship, Faculty of Entrepreneurship, University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran4. Guest Professor, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia
Interests: economics; innovation; entrepreneurship
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Claus Springborg
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. External Lecturer, Copenhagen Business School, Solbjerg Plads 3, DK-2000 Frederiksberg, Denmark
2. Founder, CoCreation Leadership Development
3. Founder, Sensing Mind Institute
Interests: leadership education; art; cognitive science; systems of personal development; co-creation; entrepreneurship
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In spite of modern perceptions of art and business as being polar opposites of the other, both in terms of value systems and of operating fundamentals, business has much to learn from the arts, and management is more of an art than people recognize. Successful artists and executives share common prerequisites. Business can grow artistically by the alchemy of invention. As companies find their business environment increasingly complex to navigate, like perpetual whitewater brought upon by unprecedented technological and social changes, art can be a powerful tool to catalyze innovation and transform culture, helping companies discover/re-discover their compass, create new rafts to conquer the rapids and find “blue ocean” market spaces far ahead of competition.

From industry leaders such as Autodesk and Google to frontier startups such as Planet.com, forward-thinking companies have adopted artist-in-residence programs to maintain creative edge and catalyze new business opportunities. European Commission has launched the START prize, featuring innovative cooperation between art and industry/technology. There have also been some studies demonstrating the linkage between creativity training and the bottom-line. However, such studies are few and far between, and the vast majority of businesspeople cannot see much use for art in business beyond decoration in the lobby and maybe some branding value.

We invite potential contributors to submit essays, case studies and research findings articulating and proving arts’ value for business management, especially for innovation. We particularly welcome insights and data addressing the frequently asked question from the skeptics: “What is the ROI of an art program?” We also encourage any views on the difference between art and design, and any art-thinking framework, which might take the popular design-thinking approach a step further. Insights from creative industries that have broader applicability to the business world would be appropriate as well.

Ms. Beibei Song
Prof. Piero Formica
Dr. Claus Springborg
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Open Innovation: Technology, Market, and Complexity is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Creative leadership
  • Artful management
  • Artful innovation
  • Art
  • Creativity
  • Innovation
  • Creativity training
  • Art-thinking
  • Design-thinking
  • Leadership
  • Management
  • Business

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Art Hacking for Business Innovation: An Exploratory Case Study on Applied Artistic Strategies
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2019, 5(1), 20; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc5010020 - 14 Mar 2019
Abstract
Despite a growing interest in the effects of arts-based interventions on organizational change, concepts aiming at business innovation and product development other than residencies are rare. Furthermore, little is known about the role and impact of artists involved in idea-generating formats. How does [...] Read more.
Despite a growing interest in the effects of arts-based interventions on organizational change, concepts aiming at business innovation and product development other than residencies are rare. Furthermore, little is known about the role and impact of artists involved in idea-generating formats. How does the personal presence of artists in a heterogenous working group influence the procedure? To what extent do artists unfold their creative qualities while dealing with such a non-artistic challenge? The paper introduces a method named Art Hacking that applies professional labour attitudes typical for artists and artistic modes of thinking to business problems and enhances the approach by having artists attend the whole intervention. One of these events was taken as a case for exploring the role of four artists in the collective idea-generation process. The results of participatory observation along critical incident technique substantiate the thesis that in interdisciplinary “playgrounds” artists implicitly become process leaders. They are catalysts for awareness, sensemaking and change of perspective. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Business, Open Innovation and Art)
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Open AccessArticle
From Design Thinking to Art Thinking with an Open Innovation Perspective—A Case Study of How Art Thinking Rescued a Cultural Institution in Dublin
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2018, 4(4), 57; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc4040057 - 03 Dec 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
This article uses a contemporary and revelatory case study to explore the relationship between three conversations in the innovation literature: Design Thinking, creativity in strategy, and the emerging area of Art Thinking. Businesses are increasingly operating in a VUCA environment where they need [...] Read more.
This article uses a contemporary and revelatory case study to explore the relationship between three conversations in the innovation literature: Design Thinking, creativity in strategy, and the emerging area of Art Thinking. Businesses are increasingly operating in a VUCA environment where they need to design better experiences for their customers and better outcomes for their firm and the Arts are no exception. Innovation, or more correctly, growth through innovation, is a top priority for business and although there is no single, unifying blueprint for success at innovation, Design Thinking is the process that is receiving most attention and getting most traction. We review the literature on Design Thinking, showing how it teaches businesses to think with the creativity and intuition of a designer to show a deep understanding of, and have empathy with, the user. However, Design Thinking has limitations. By placing the consumer at the very heart of the innovation process, Design Thinking can often lead to more incremental, rather than radical, ideas. Now there is a new perspective emerging, Art Thinking, in which the objective is not to design a journey from the current scenario, A, to an improved position, A+. Art Thinking requires the creation of an optimal position B, and spends more time in the open-ended problem space, staking out possibilities and looking for uncontested space. This paper offers a single case study of a national arts organisation in Dublin facing an existential crisis, which used an Art Thinking approach successfully to give a much-needed shot in the arm to its commercial innovation activities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Business, Open Innovation and Art)
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Open AccessArticle
Collaborative Innovation: Exploring the Intersections among Theater, Art and Business in the Classroom
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2018, 4(4), 52; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc4040052 - 29 Oct 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
There is a long history of conversations about integrating business and arts-based learning, but they are taking on more urgency today as technology-induced change and global interconnectivity are altering how humans learn, create, and construct new knowledge in unprecedented ways. However, there is [...] Read more.
There is a long history of conversations about integrating business and arts-based learning, but they are taking on more urgency today as technology-induced change and global interconnectivity are altering how humans learn, create, and construct new knowledge in unprecedented ways. However, there is much still to be learned about how the disciplines might be integrated and in what ways they can jointly serve the development not only of university students, but of how professional practice itself is defined. Over the past three years, faculty from the Theater and Dance Performance Studies, Art Practice, and Business disciplines at UC Berkeley have collaborated to create a course, Collaborative Innovation, that explores both collaboration and innovation at the intersection of these three fields. This paper presents a framework for a genuinely integrated interdisciplinary class that interweaves personal development and growth with problem framing and solving skills, and diverse-team participation and leadership. Quotes from student reflection papers bring alive the transformational experiences students went through in this course. The integration of socially engaged art, business, and theater/performance through collaborative teamwork tackling important and challenging social problems opens unexpected potential for student development as future contributors to society. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Business, Open Innovation and Art)
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Open AccessArticle
Joseph Beuys’ Rediscovery of Man–Nature Relationship: A Pioneering Experience of Open Social Innovation
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2018, 4(4), 50; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc4040050 - 23 Oct 2018
Abstract
The emerging paradigm of sustainability represents a challenging field in terms of new technologies, market regulations, and business models. Limits of both linear industrial development and consumerist way of living have been clearly identified since the late 1960s by the first systemic studies [...] Read more.
The emerging paradigm of sustainability represents a challenging field in terms of new technologies, market regulations, and business models. Limits of both linear industrial development and consumerist way of living have been clearly identified since the late 1960s by the first systemic studies on the effect of human activities on Earth. Many contributions from different disciplines have paved the way for an open, participated, and responsible innovation approach, which is presently triggering the transition toward a nonexploitative human development. An anticipation of this conceptual framework can be found in Joseph Beuys’ art, which can still represent a source of inspiration for innovators, entrepreneurs, economists, and community leaders. In his artistic legacy—from the six blackboards of Perugia to the 7000 Oaks of Kassel—Beuys is still asking us to transform our everyday actions, joining the collective effort toward a new evolutionary stage of humanity, founded upon a holistic vision of society and nature. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Business, Open Innovation and Art)
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Open AccessArticle
Classical Guitar Study as Creativity Training: Potential Benefits for Managers and Entrepreneurs
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2018, 4(4), 45; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc4040045 - 25 Sep 2018
Abstract
Divergent thinking ability, as an aspect of creativity, seems valuable to managers and entrepreneurs as they employ the tools of creative problem-solving and innovative thinking in pursuit of business success. Musical study in general, and classical guitar study to a greater degree, has [...] Read more.
Divergent thinking ability, as an aspect of creativity, seems valuable to managers and entrepreneurs as they employ the tools of creative problem-solving and innovative thinking in pursuit of business success. Musical study in general, and classical guitar study to a greater degree, has the potential to improve divergent thinking and creative problem-solving abilities. As such, I suggest that utilizing classical guitar study as a creativity training tool may benefit entrepreneurs and managers within a variety of industries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Business, Open Innovation and Art)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Creativity in Business Education: A Review of Creative Self-Belief Theories and Arts-Based Methods
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2018, 4(4), 55; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc4040055 - 20 Nov 2018
Abstract
Creativity has become one of the most sought-after skills from graduates across business and industry. It is therefore imperative to infuse creativity training within business programs of study and professional development experiences, to remind people of their eternally curious and creative nature. The [...] Read more.
Creativity has become one of the most sought-after skills from graduates across business and industry. It is therefore imperative to infuse creativity training within business programs of study and professional development experiences, to remind people of their eternally curious and creative nature. The objective of this paper is to explore the literature around theories of creative potential and performance—including creative identity, creative mindset, and creative self-efficacy. We consider perspectives that reveal that creativity is a mindset predicated on beliefs and ways of thinking. Educational psychology literature and theories of creative self-belief illustrate how creative identity, mindset, and self-efficacy form the core of an individual’s belief system to think, act, and develop creatively in the world. This connects to the potential of arts-based methods as a means to infuse creative learning into business education. We illustrate how our findings can be put into practice by sharing an example of an art-based intervention that is currently in progress to develop creative capacity among students in an internationally known business program. We conclude with the idea that its incumbent upon business education, professional development, and training to incorporate methodologies that enhance creative capacity by initially eliminating or minimizing self-perceived limitations in people, such as fear, negative personal judgement, and chattering of the mind—and theories of creative self-belief provide a foundation that can undergird arts-based methods toward this goal. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Business, Open Innovation and Art)
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