Topical Collection "Additive Manufacturing of Metal Components"

A topical collection in Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This collection belongs to the section "Mechanical Engineering".

Editors

Dr. Lonnie J. Love
E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
Manufacturing Systems Research Group, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 2350 Cherahala Blvd, Knoxville TN, USA
Interests: design; robotics; hydraulics; additive manufacturing; nanomaterials
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Ryan R. Dehoff
E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
Manufacturing Systems Research Group, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 2350 Cherahala Blvd, Knoxville, TN, USA
Interests: electron beam melting; laser metal deposition; ultrasonic additive manufacturing
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

Metal additive manufacturing enables the rapid, low-volume production of highly complex metallic components. Numerous industries are highly interested in directly manufacturing metallic components, but there remains great uncertainty in terms of the processes and controls slowing widespread industrialization. This is complicated due to the tremendous flexibility in materials and processes, with each having their own strengths and weaknesses. Approaches vary from direct energy deposition to powder bed fusion, extrusion, and thermal and cold spray, to name just a few. Each of these processes, while simple in principle, exhibits its own complexity in terms of material properties that are a function of processing parameters, toolpaths, and systems and controls. In many cases, there seems to be more art than science when it comes to reliably being able to manufacture components using these advanced manufacturing processes. This uncertainty can lead to the slow adoption of the technologies in industrial settings.

We invite authors to contribute original research articles, as well as review articles, that will contribute to the area of metal additive manufacturing materials, processes, and controls.

Potential topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • Advanced materials for additive manufacturing;
  • Advanced metrology and control technology for metal additive manufacturing;
  • Data analytics and AI approaches to partial certification and control;
  • New metal additive manufacturing processes.

Dr. Lonnie J. Love
Dr. Ryan R. Dehoff
Collection Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • metal additive manufacturing
  • metrology
  • data analytics
  • machine learning

Published Papers (1 paper)

2021

Article
Mechanical Properties of White Metal on SCM440 Alloy Steel by Laser Cladding Treatment
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(6), 2836; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11062836 - 22 Mar 2021
Viewed by 534
Abstract
The bearing is a machine element that plays an important role in rotating the shaft of a machine while supporting its weight and load. Numerous bearings have been developed to improve durability and life, depending on the functions and operating conditions in which [...] Read more.
The bearing is a machine element that plays an important role in rotating the shaft of a machine while supporting its weight and load. Numerous bearings have been developed to improve durability and life, depending on the functions and operating conditions in which they are desired. White metal is one of method to improve durability that is soft and bonded to the inner surface of the bearing to protect the bearing shaft. Currently, the centrifugal casting process is used as a white metal lamination method, but it involves problems such as long processing times, high defect rates and harmful health effects. In this paper, a laser cladding treatment is applied to bond powdered white metal to SCM440 alloy steel, which is used as bearing material in terms of replacing the risks of a centrifugal process. In order to understand whether laser cladding is a suitable process, this paper compares the mechanical properties of white metal produced on SCM440 alloy steel by centrifugal casting and the laser cladding process. The laser power, powder feed rate and laser head speed factors are varied to understand the mechanical properties and measure the hardness using micro Vickers and conduct field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and friction testing to understand the mechanical properties and surface characteristics. Based on the results, the hardness values of the cladding (white metal) layer ranged between 24 and 26 HV in both the centrifugal casting and laser cladding methods. However, the hardness of the white metal produced by laser cladding at about a depth of 0.1 mm rose rapidly in the cladding process, forming a heat-affected zone (HAZ) with an average hardness value of 200 HV at a laser power of 1.1 kW, 325 HV at 1.3 kW and 430 HV at 1.5 kW. The surface friction testing results revealed no significant differences in the friction coefficient between the centrifugal casting and laser cladding methods, which allows the assumption that the processing method does not significantly influence the friction coefficient. Full article
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