Innovative Methods for Improving Fresh and Cooked Meat Shelf Life Characteristics

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2022) | Viewed by 9243

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Animal Sciences, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849, USA
Interests: meat products; shelf-life; packaging methodology; meat packaging; surface color
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Special Issue Information

Packaging of meat in consumer-ready materials continues to evolve, with newer technologies within packaging films, packaging trays, and packaging gases. All of these factors are instrumental in the appearance of meat proteins at the consumer level (retail outlet). As changes in technology occur, and the consumer heightens their purchasing intent with greater focus on the surface color of meat proteins, it is necessary to dive into the driving factors that influence the shelf life of meat proteins at the consumer level. It is the intent of this summary to provide some unique viewpoints that influence the storage duration of meat proteins. Through storage temperatures of raw materials, to packaging film variations, and even display methods, the readers of this summary should find that more efforts are needed on the investigation of meat protein shelf life.

Dr. Jason Sawyer
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • meat proteins
  • packaging technologies
  • consumer purchase interest
  • meat storage

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

20 pages, 1996 KiB  
Article
Thiamine Demonstrates Bio-Preservative and Anti-Microbial Effects in Minced Beef Meat Storage and Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-Stimulated RAW 264.7 Macrophages
by Anis Ben Hsouna, Alex Boye, Bouthaina Ben Ackacha, Wissal Dhifi, Rania Ben Saad, Faiçal Brini, Wissem Mnif and Miroslava Kačániová
Animals 2022, 12(13), 1646; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani12131646 - 27 Jun 2022
Cited by 18 | Viewed by 2250
Abstract
This study assessed the anti-inflammatory effect of thiamine (TA) in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW264.7 cells and also assessed the preservative properties of TA in minced beef. TA demonstrated a concentration-dependent antimicrobial effect on microbial contaminants. Inhibition zones and MIC from the effect of TA on [...] Read more.
This study assessed the anti-inflammatory effect of thiamine (TA) in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW264.7 cells and also assessed the preservative properties of TA in minced beef. TA demonstrated a concentration-dependent antimicrobial effect on microbial contaminants. Inhibition zones and MIC from the effect of TA on the tested bacterial strains were respectively within the ranges 15–20 mm and 62.5–700 µg/mL. TA significantly (p < 0.05) decreased all the pro-inflammatory factors [(nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)] monitored relative to LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. TA inhibited the expression of both iNOS and COX-2. In minced beef flesh, the growth of Listeria monocytogenes was inhibited by TA. TA improved physicochemical and microbiological parameters of stored minced beef meat compared to control. Principal component analyses and heat maps elucidate the quality of the tested meats. Full article
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7 pages, 1179 KiB  
Article
Physicochemical Parameters of Raw Pet Food and Dehydrated Pet Treats Developed from Beef Processing Co-Products
by Marc R. Presume, Rigo F. Soler, Moses E. Chilenje, Jorge L. Sandoval, Luis P. Avila, Laura J. Garner, Robert P. Mason, Eric K. Altom and Charles W. Starkey
Animals 2022, 12(3), 278; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani12030278 - 23 Jan 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3627
Abstract
Pet humanization and premiumization of pet foods have led to significant changes in the co-product market, as pet food companies are looking for more profitable protein sources for their products. Co-products such as beef liver (BL) and beef heart (BH) can be combined [...] Read more.
Pet humanization and premiumization of pet foods have led to significant changes in the co-product market, as pet food companies are looking for more profitable protein sources for their products. Co-products such as beef liver (BL) and beef heart (BH) can be combined to generate restructured pet foods rich in vitamins and nutrients. Sodium alginate and encapsulated calcium lactate (ALGIN) can improve the acceptability of meat pieces by transforming them into a singular shape. The objective of this experiment was to assess the physiochemical parameters of co-products for utilization in raw pet foods and restructured pet treats generated from BL and BH by using ALGIN as a structure-forming agent. Results demonstrated increased cooking loss as ALGIN inclusion decreased, but cooking loss decreased as BL proportions increased (p = 0.0056). Expressible moisture of raw pet food decreased as ALGIN inclusion increased, but more moisture was released from treats when BL proportions increased (p < 0.0001). Increasing ALGIN and BH led to increased water activity of cooked treats (p < 0.0001). Thus, we suggest that BL and BH combinations with ALGIN inclusion produces a viable platform for higher inclusions of co-products in pet treats. Additionally, these ingredients improved the finished product quality characteristics of raw pet foods. Full article
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10 pages, 253 KiB  
Article
Shelf-Life Evaluation of Ingredient Combinations and Technologies for Use in Pet Food Formulations
by Madison P. Wagoner, Marc R. Presume, Moses E. Chilenje, Gerardo A. Abascal-Ponciano, Jorge L. Sandoval, Hunter R. Smith, Tristan M. Reyes, Barney S. Wilborn, Justin A. Dunavant, Robert P. Mason, Eric K. Altom, Charles W. Starkey and Jason T. Sawyer
Animals 2022, 12(2), 152; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani12020152 - 8 Jan 2022
Viewed by 2695
Abstract
Poultry co-product chicken frames (CF) and wooden breast (WB) along with ingredient technology use may bring enhanced value to the pet food industry. Therefore, the current study focused on evaluating CF and WB combinations along with sodium alginate and encapsulated calcium lactate pentahydrate [...] Read more.
Poultry co-product chicken frames (CF) and wooden breast (WB) along with ingredient technology use may bring enhanced value to the pet food industry. Therefore, the current study focused on evaluating CF and WB combinations along with sodium alginate and encapsulated calcium lactate pentahydrate (ALGIN) inclusion within a fresh pet food formulation under simulated shelf-life conditions. Fresh chicken frames (CF) and boneless-skinless wooden breast (WB) were ground and allocated randomly to one of ten treatment combinations with either 0.5 or 1.0% added ALGIN. Ground treatments were placed into a form and fill vacuum package and stored using a reach-in refrigerated case for 21 days. Packages were evaluated for instrumental surface color, lipid oxidation, water activity, and pH on days 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 of the display. Packages of pet food were lighter, less red, and more yellow (p < 0.05) with increasing percentages of CF regardless of ALGIN inclusion, whereas pH was greater (p < 0.05) and lipid oxidation was less (p < 0.05) with increasing percentage of WB. Water activity increased (p < 0.05) when WB and ALGIN inclusion increased. The current results suggest that the use of ALGIN in a poultry co-product pet food formulation can improve shelf-life characteristics such as surface color and lipid oxidation in fresh pet food. Full article
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