Special Issue "Human–Animal Relationships and Reservoir Host Status for Zoonoses"

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Nicole Gottdenker
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Pathology, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA
Interests: disease ecology; wildlife disease ecology; wildlife pathology; theoretical ecology; tropical ecology; zoonotic diseases

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Zoonotic disease transmission between domestic and wild animals and humans requires direct or indirect contact between animals and humans. The types of relationships between humans and animals, as well as human awareness of zoonotic disease risk, may impact the risk of transmission of zoonotic pathogens from animals to humans. These human–animal relationships take many forms, including pet ownership, livestock ownership, wildlife harvesting, wildlife conservation activities, tourism, and intended and unintended resource provisioning of wildlife. In this Special Issue, we invite the submission of articles that explore the wide variety of functional relationships, including disease awareness and attitudes, that humans have in relation to animal reservoirs of zoonotic diseases, and how these relationships impact disease risk assessments.

Dr. Nicole Gottdenker
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • human–animal relationships
  • zoonotic diseases
  • reservoir host
  • zoonotic disease transmission

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Beliefs, Attitudes and Self-Efficacy of Australian Veterinary Students Regarding One Health and Zoonosis Management
Animals 2019, 9(8), 544; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani9080544 - 10 Aug 2019
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1209
Abstract
This study aimed to explore the beliefs and attitudes of a group of senior veterinary students regarding One Health and to evaluate their levels of confidence in advising the general public on preventative health issues at the human–animal interface. An online survey was [...] Read more.
This study aimed to explore the beliefs and attitudes of a group of senior veterinary students regarding One Health and to evaluate their levels of confidence in advising the general public on preventative health issues at the human–animal interface. An online survey was communicated to senior veterinary students who were in their last two years of study. The questionnaire covered beliefs and attitudes, issues concerning the animal–human interface and participants’ confidence in diagnosing zoonoses. In total, 175 students from five Australian veterinary schools/colleges completed the online survey. The majority (96%) of students considered it their duty to promote the One Health approach, but only 36% believed there were sufficient practical frameworks for Australian veterinarian graduates to promote One Health. Interestingly, 81% (142/175) of respondents believed that veterinarians were more knowledgeable than physicians in managing zoonotic cases. Of the final-year students (n = 77), only 39% and 36% were confident in their ability to diagnose zoonoses in common companion animals and production animals, respectively. However, the number of those confident to diagnose zoonoses transmitted from wildlife was notably lower (22% (17/77)). Next-generation Australian veterinarians are keen to embrace their role in interprofessional collaboration; however, training efforts are required to reassure future veterinarians on aspects of zoonoses and One Health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human–Animal Relationships and Reservoir Host Status for Zoonoses)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
The Presence of Toxocara Eggs on Dog’s Fur as Potential Zoonotic Risk in Animal-Assisted Interventions: A Systematic Review
Animals 2019, 9(10), 827; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani9100827 - 19 Oct 2019
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1292
Abstract
Animal-assisted interventions (AAIs) usually contribute to the well-being and health of users/patients, but it is essential that the animals involved in these activities do not represent a source of zoonoses. This systematic review focused on the evaluation of the potential risk of the [...] Read more.
Animal-assisted interventions (AAIs) usually contribute to the well-being and health of users/patients, but it is essential that the animals involved in these activities do not represent a source of zoonoses. This systematic review focused on the evaluation of the potential risk of the transmission of Toxocara by dogs’ fur, considering their involvement as the main animal species in AAIs. Three databases were considered: MEDLINE/PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science, and the PRISMA guidelines were used. Out of 162 articles found, 14 papers were identified as eligible for inclusion in the review. Although the findings were very heterogeneous, they showed that regular parasitological surveillance to plan effective control programs is strongly needed to guarantee the health of pets and consequently the public health, according to the concept of One Health. Since AAIs involve patients and/or users potentially susceptible, it is very important to appropriately treat dogs enrolled in these interventions after an accurate diagnosis of parasitic zoonoses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human–Animal Relationships and Reservoir Host Status for Zoonoses)
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