Special Issue "Enhancing Fertilizer-Use Efficiency in Organic Cropping Systems"

A special issue of Agriculture (ISSN 2077-0472).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2017).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Guodong Liu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Horticultural Sciences Department, University of Florida/IFAS, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
Interests: plant physiology, plant nutrition, vegetable and fruit production, plant abiotic stress such as flooding/hypoxia, low-phosphorus, salinity

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Based on the FAO/WHO Codex Alimentarius Commission in 1999, as a holistic production management system, organic farming promotes and enhances agro-ecosystem health, including biodiversity, biological cycles, and soil biological activity. It emphasizes the use of management practices. An organic cropping system is run by using only agronomic, biological, and mechanical methods to fulfil a specific function within the system. Since 1990, the market for organic food products has grown rapidly worldwide. Organic farming has accordingly expanded and is globally practiced in more than 170 countries. Almost 44 million hectares of agricultural land are organically managed in 2014. Economically, the global sales of organic commodities of food and drink reached US$ 80 billion. Socially, organic farming provided approximately 2.3 million full-time job opportunities. Organic cropping systems mull over potential environmental and social impacts by eliminating the input of artificial products, e.g., synthetic fertilizers, pesticides, herbicides, and genetically modified seeds. These inputs are all replaced with site-specific management practices in order to sustain and enhance soil fertility and prevent crops from biotic and low-fertility stresses. Consequently, it has aroused new challenges in efficient-use of fertilizers and hence, crop productivity. It is, therefore, imperative to maximize fertilizer-use efficiency in organic cropping systems. This Special Issue serves as a forum for all of active researchers over the world to get together and share their new ideas and advances in this exciting area of research. Original contributions to this Special Issue include the following topics:

•    4R nutrient stewardship
•    Vegetable grafting
•    Synergizing biochar with farming
•    Crop biodiversity and identification of elite genotypes
•    Application of compost
•    Cover cropping
•    Intercropping  
•    Crop rotation
•    Polyculture
•    Permaculture
•    Ley farming

Dr. Guodong Liu
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • fertilizer-use efficiency
  • 4R nutrient stewardship
  • potential yield
  • constraints to growth, water status
  • compost
  • crop rotation

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Effect of Organic, Inorganic Fertilizers and Plant Spacing on the Growth and Yield of Cabbage
Agriculture 2017, 7(4), 31; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture7040031 - 29 Mar 2017
Cited by 3
Abstract
The impact of chemical farming and the negative consequences on the environment and human health in Bangladesh are on the rise. Organic farming is gaining attention and increasing globally because it is eco-friendly, safe and has benefits for human health. A field study [...] Read more.
The impact of chemical farming and the negative consequences on the environment and human health in Bangladesh are on the rise. Organic farming is gaining attention and increasing globally because it is eco-friendly, safe and has benefits for human health. A field study was conducted at the horticulture farm of Bangladesh Agricultural University (BAU), Mymensingh, to evaluate the growth and yield performance of cabbage cv. Atlas—70 using organic and inorganic fertilizers in various plant spacing arrangements. Two factor experiments were conducted on plant spacings of 60 cm × 40 cm (S1), 60 cm × 50 cm (S2) and 60 cm × 60 cm (S3) and fertilizers vermicompost (T1), biogen (T2), integrated plant nutrient system (IPNS) Organic (⅔) + inorganic (⅓) (T3) and inorganic (T4). IPNS (T3) application increased the marketable yield (54.77 t·ha−1) of cabbage. The highest marketable yield (48.75 t·ha−1) was obtained with a plant spacing of 60 cm × 40 cm (S1). No significant variation was found in plant spacings S1 and S2. The treatment combination of S2T3 recorded the highest plant height (37.81 cm), plant spread (47.75 cm), cabbage head (21.80 cm), stem length (12.31 cm), thickness of the cabbage head (12.53 cm) and marketable yield (65.0 t·ha−1). The results suggest that IPNS (T3) combining organic and inorganic fertilizer applications with a 60 cm × 50 cm spacing (S2T3) increases the yield performance of cabbage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Enhancing Fertilizer-Use Efficiency in Organic Cropping Systems)
Open AccessArticle
Effect of Organic and Inorganic Fertilizers on Soil  Properties and the Growth, Yield and Quality of  Tomato in Mymensingh, Bangladesh
Agriculture 2017, 7(3), 18; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture7030018 - 07 Mar 2017
Cited by 5
Abstract
Field trials were conducted on tomato for yield and quality of fruits using different types of organic and inorganic fertilizers at the horticulture farm of Bangladesh Agricultural University (BAU), Mymensingh. Fertilizer treatments were tested on two varieties of tomato ca. Roma VF and [...] Read more.
Field trials were conducted on tomato for yield and quality of fruits using different types of organic and inorganic fertilizers at the horticulture farm of Bangladesh Agricultural University (BAU), Mymensingh. Fertilizer treatments were tested on two varieties of tomato ca. Roma VF and BARI 15. The fertilization treatments were T1, vermicompost (12 t/ha); T2, compost (10 t/ha); T3, integrated plant nutrient system (IPNS) or mixed fertilizers (organic 2/3 part and inorganic 1/3 part); T4, inorganic fertilizers; and a control (T5). Results showed growth and yield (20.8 t/ha) in tomato were higher in the IPNS treatment. A higher number of fruits per plant (73.7) and plant height (73.5 cm) were obtained from mixed fertilizers (organic 2/3 + inorganic 1/3) or IPNS (integrated plant nutrient system) in Roma VF than other treatments. Fruit yield and diameter were found statistically significant. No significant difference was observed in the quality (total soluble solids) of tomato fruits in both varieties’ response to the treatments. The electrical conductivity and pH of the soil were improved by the application of organic manure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Enhancing Fertilizer-Use Efficiency in Organic Cropping Systems)
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Open AccessArticle
Can Phosphate Salts Recovered from Manure Replace Conventional Phosphate Fertilizer?
Agriculture 2017, 7(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture7010001 - 07 Jan 2017
Cited by 18
Abstract
Pig farming produces more manure than can reasonably be spread onto surrounding fields, particularly in regions with high livestock densities and limited land availability. Nutrient recycling offers an attractive solution for dealing with manure excesses and is one main objective of the European [...] Read more.
Pig farming produces more manure than can reasonably be spread onto surrounding fields, particularly in regions with high livestock densities and limited land availability. Nutrient recycling offers an attractive solution for dealing with manure excesses and is one main objective of the European commission-funded project “BioEcoSIM”. Phosphate salts (“P-Salt”) were recovered from the separated liquid manure fraction. The solid fraction was dried and carbonized to biochar. This study compared the fertilizing performance of P-Salt and conventional phosphate fertilizer and determined whether additional biochar application further increased biomass yields. The fertilizers and biochar were tested in pot experiments with spring barley and faba beans using two nutrient-poor soils. The crops were fertilized with P-Salt at three levels and biochar in two concentrations. Biomass yield was determined after six weeks. Plant and soil samples were analysed for nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium contents. The P-Salt had similar or even better effects than mineral fertilizer on growth in both crops and soils. Slow release of nutrients can prevent leaching, rendering P-Salt a particularly suitable fertilizer for light sandy soils. Biochar can enhance its fertilizing effect, but the underlying mechanisms need further investigation. These novel products are concluded to be promising candidates for efficient fertilization strategies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Enhancing Fertilizer-Use Efficiency in Organic Cropping Systems)
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