Selected Papers from the 4th International Aviation Management Conference

A special issue of Aerospace (ISSN 2226-4310).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2023) | Viewed by 25217

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Aerospace Engineering and Aviation, School of Engineering, RMIT University, Building 57, Level 3, 115 Queensberry St., Carlton, VIC 3053, Australia
Interests: aircraft maintenance; predictive maintenance; decision support
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Guest Editor
Institute of Applied Research & Technology, Emirates Aviation University, P.O. Box 53044, Dubai, United Arab Emirates
Interests: applied mathematics; data science; dynamical systems; infectious disease modelling

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is cooperating with the 4th International Aviation Management Conference (IAMC-2022), which is the premier forum for presenting new advances and research results in aviation management. The Conference brings together leading professionals and researchers in the domain of interest from around the world. The theme for this year’s conference is ‘The Future of Aviation: COVID-19 Pandemic and Challenges’. IAMC-2022’s topics will include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Airline operation and management.
  • Air transport policy and regulation.
  • Airport planning and management.
  • Aviation management and strategy.
  • Aviation finance and economics.
  • Aviation law.
  • Aviation safety and security.
  • Sustainable aviation.
  • Technical advances and impact.
  • Women in aviation.

Authors are invited to submit original research papers within the scope of the Conference to IAMC-2022. Following the acceptance and presentation of their papers at IAMC-2022, authors are welcome to submit extended versions of their conference work to this Special Issue of Aerospace for review and publication in the journal.

Dr. Wim J. C. Verhagen
Prof. Dr. Zindoga Mukandavire
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Aerospace is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

24 pages, 1876 KiB  
Article
The Influence of Repair Quality on Aircraft Spare Part Demand Variability
by Lars M. Heijenrath and Wim J. C. Verhagen
Aerospace 2023, 10(8), 731; https://doi.org/10.3390/aerospace10080731 - 20 Aug 2023
Viewed by 1512
Abstract
Accurate estimation of spare part demand is challenging in the case of intermittent or lumpy demand, characterised by infrequent demand occurrence and variability in demand size. While prior research has considered the effect of exogenous variables on spare part demand, there is a [...] Read more.
Accurate estimation of spare part demand is challenging in the case of intermittent or lumpy demand, characterised by infrequent demand occurrence and variability in demand size. While prior research has considered the effect of exogenous variables on spare part demand, there is a lack of research considering the effects of repair quality and aggregated spare part demand behaviour across fleets of assets under the influence of multiple simultaneously acting drivers of failure. This research provides new insights towards the problem of estimating variable spare part demand through modelling and simulation of the effects of multiple, simultaneously considered spare part demand drivers. In particular, a contribution to the state of the art is introduced by the use of a Branching Poisson Process (BPP) to model repair quality effects for spare part demand generation in conjunction with several demand drivers. The approach is applied in a numerical study which involves component failure characteristics based on real-life data from an aircraft maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO) provider. It is shown that repair quality improvements drive down the variance in the demand and the total number of failures over time, and outperform the effect of environmental drivers of failure in terms of demand generation. Full article
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23 pages, 4761 KiB  
Article
Optimising Airport Ground Resource Allocation for Multiple Aircraft Using Machine Learning-Based Arrival Time Prediction
by Deepudev Sahadevan, Hannah Al Ali, Dorian Notman and Zindoga Mukandavire
Aerospace 2023, 10(6), 509; https://doi.org/10.3390/aerospace10060509 - 29 May 2023
Viewed by 4122
Abstract
Managing aircraft turnaround is a complex process due to various factors, including passenger handling. Airport ground handling, resource planning, optimal manpower, and equipment utilisation are some cost-cutting strategies, particularly for airlines and ground handling service teams. Scheduled aircraft arrival and departure times are [...] Read more.
Managing aircraft turnaround is a complex process due to various factors, including passenger handling. Airport ground handling, resource planning, optimal manpower, and equipment utilisation are some cost-cutting strategies, particularly for airlines and ground handling service teams. Scheduled aircraft arrival and departure times are critical aspects of the entire ground management and passenger handling process. This research aimed to optimise airport ground resource allocation for multiple aircraft using machine learning-based prediction methodologies to enhance the prediction of aircraft arrival time, an uncontrollable variable. Our proposed models include a multiple linear regression (MLR) model and a multilayer perceptron (MLP)-based model, both of which are used for predicting round-trip arrival times. Additionally, we developed a MLP-based model for multiclass classification of arrival delays based on departure time and delay from the same airport. Under normal weather conditions and operational scenarios, the models were able to predict round-trip arrival times with a root mean squared error of 8 min for each origin–destination pair and classify arrival delays with an average accuracy of 93.5%. Our findings suggest that machine learning-based approaches can be used to predict round-trip arrival times based on the departure time from the same airport, and thereby accurately estimate the number of actual flight movements per hour well in advance. This predictability enables optimised ground resource planning for multiple aircraft based on constrained airport resource deployment and utilisation. Full article
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25 pages, 4174 KiB  
Article
Numerical Investigation of Bio-Aviation Fuel: Dubai’s Future Perspective
by Houreya Aldarrai, Dhabya Alsuwaidi, Beenish Khan, Haoyang Xu and Elham Tolouei
Aerospace 2023, 10(4), 338; https://doi.org/10.3390/aerospace10040338 - 28 Mar 2023
Viewed by 2316
Abstract
As part of the United Arab Emirates’ and the world’s aviation goal of reaching net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, this paper studied the potential of successfully implementing both biofuel “drop-in” alternatives and aerodynamically efficient configurations to decarbonize the aviation industry. By investigating [...] Read more.
As part of the United Arab Emirates’ and the world’s aviation goal of reaching net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, this paper studied the potential of successfully implementing both biofuel “drop-in” alternatives and aerodynamically efficient configurations to decarbonize the aviation industry. By investigating various proposed designs through a PUGH analysis, it was concluded that the optimum design has a Transonic Truss-Braced Wing configuration and runs on 60% biofuel. Although the design stipulates a 1.3% increase in weight, this does not negate the reduction in emissions and fuel consumption. This study also explored the various types of biofuels and found camelina seeds to be the best choice. The effects of biofuels in comparison with Jet-A fuel were further deliberated in a fuel combustion simulation performed on the Ansys-Fluent software. The results of the simulation showed a reduction of 50% in carbon monoxide (CO) and 24% in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions when burning camelina biofuel rather than Jet-A, making it an ideal alternative to those conventional jet fuels. A primary cost analysis of biofuel applications showed an increase of 453 USD (1653.18 AED) per passenger flying on board 100%-biofuel-powered aircrafts. Yet, considering the trend of the cost increase with the biofuel blend ratio, a solution may exist to the increased cost of biofuel-powered aircrafts. Full article
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15 pages, 2063 KiB  
Article
The Introduction of Sustainable Aviation Fuels—A Discussion of Challenges, Options and Alternatives
by Wolfgang Grimme
Aerospace 2023, 10(3), 218; https://doi.org/10.3390/aerospace10030218 - 25 Feb 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 7616
Abstract
The aviation industry is challenged to reduce its climate impact. The introduction of sustainable aviation fuels (SAF) is, among other policy instruments such as the European Emissions Trading Scheme, an option favored by policymakers in Europe to achieve this objective. These fuels feature [...] Read more.
The aviation industry is challenged to reduce its climate impact. The introduction of sustainable aviation fuels (SAF) is, among other policy instruments such as the European Emissions Trading Scheme, an option favored by policymakers in Europe to achieve this objective. These fuels feature substantially reduced carbon life-cycle emissions in comparison to fossil fuels. In Europe, a mandatory quota for the use of sustainable fuels will most likely be introduced, starting in the year 2025. The introduction of a blending mandate by governments and the European Commission is associated with a range of challenges. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the economics of climate change mitigation in aviation and the role SAFs can play. The economic issues associated with the introduction of SAFs are analyzed, with a particular focus on the European Commission’s proposal for a blending mandate. Several suggestions for improvement are discussed. Furthermore, alternatives to SAFs are presented and evaluated. Full article
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13 pages, 4860 KiB  
Article
Emerging from the COVID-19 Pandemic: Aviation Recovery, Challenges and Opportunities
by Kaitano Dube
Aerospace 2023, 10(1), 19; https://doi.org/10.3390/aerospace10010019 - 25 Dec 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 7655
Abstract
This exploratory study examined the impacts of COVID-19 and emerging challenges and opportunities from aviation recovery. Using archival and secondary data analysis, the study found that there are several challenges to aviation recovery chief among them are labour challenges and extreme weather events, [...] Read more.
This exploratory study examined the impacts of COVID-19 and emerging challenges and opportunities from aviation recovery. Using archival and secondary data analysis, the study found that there are several challenges to aviation recovery chief among them are labour challenges and extreme weather events, which have been responsible for traffic disruptions in major aviation markets such as Europe and the USA. Other emerging challenges include high debt, inflation, interest rates, fuel, cost of labour, and general operational costs. The study recommends several interventions to address the sector’s challenges, including adopting risk disaster preparedness and management to foster sustainability. Full article
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