COVID-19 Academic Resources Center

MDPI Comment on the COVID-19 Virus

Since 1996, MDPI has been committed to supporting the research community by providing the latest research freely available and making relevant and useful research available as quickly as possible. The world is current experiencing a pandemic of COVID-19, and researchers are working extremely hard to understand it and find a cure.

The values MDPI holds strongly are particularly important at the moment, and we will continue to publish relevant, peer-reviewed research as quickly as possible in open access format. This means that it will immediately be available for researchers, health professionals, and the general public to read, distribute, and reuse. We believe that scientific advancements will be crucial to overcoming this pandemic, and will do everything we can to support researchers working looking for solutions.

This page contains a variety of information related to COVID-19 available from MDPI, including journal articles, special issues, and preprints, among others.

Recent Publications

Open AccessStudy Protocol
Comprehensive Assessment of Incidence, Risk Factors, and Mechanisms of Impaired Medical and Psychosocial Health Outcomes among Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer: Protocol of the Prospective Observational COMPRAYA Cohort Study
by , , , , , , , , and
Cancers 2021, 13(10), 2348; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers13102348 (registering DOI) - 13 May 2021
Abstract
Adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer patients suffer from delay in diagnosis, and lack of centralized cancer care, age-adjusted expertise, and follow-up care. This group presents with a unique spectrum of cancers, distinct tumor biology, cancer risk factors, developmental challenges, and treatment regimens [...] Read more.
Adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer patients suffer from delay in diagnosis, and lack of centralized cancer care, age-adjusted expertise, and follow-up care. This group presents with a unique spectrum of cancers, distinct tumor biology, cancer risk factors, developmental challenges, and treatment regimens that differ from children and older adults. It is imperative for advances in the field of AYA oncology to pool data sources across institutions and create large cohorts to address the many pressing questions that remain unanswered in this vulnerable population. We will create a nationwide infrastructure (COMPRAYA) for research into the incidence, predictive/prognostic markers, and underlying mechanisms of medical and psychosocial outcomes for AYA between 18–39 years diagnosed with cancer. A prospective, observational cohort of (n = 4000), will be established. Patients will be asked to (1) complete patient-reported outcome measures; (2) donate a blood, hair, and stool samples (to obtain biochemical, hormonal, and inflammation parameters, and germline DNA); (3) give consent for use of routinely archived tumor tissue and clinical data extraction from medical records and registries; (4) have a clinic visit to assess vital parameters. Systematic and comprehensive collection of patient and tumor characteristics of AYA will support the development of evidence-based AYA care programs and guidelines. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology)
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Open AccessReview
Assessment of the Association of COPD and Asthma with In-Hospital Mortality in Patients with COVID-19. A Systematic Review, Meta-Analysis, and Meta-Regression Analysis
by , , , , , , , , and
J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10(10), 2087; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10102087 (registering DOI) - 13 May 2021
Abstract
Together, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma account for the most common non-infectious respiratory pathologies. Conflicting preliminary studies have shown varied effect for COPD and asthma as prognostic factors for mortality in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The aim of this study was [...] Read more.
Together, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma account for the most common non-infectious respiratory pathologies. Conflicting preliminary studies have shown varied effect for COPD and asthma as prognostic factors for mortality in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The aim of this study was to explore the association of COPD and asthma with in-hospital mortality in patients with COVID-19 by systematically reviewing and synthesizing with a meta-analysis the available observational studies. MEDLINE, Scopus, and medRxiv databases were reviewed. A random-effects model meta-analysis was used, and I-square was utilized to assess for heterogeneity. In-hospital mortality was defined as the primary endpoint. Sensitivity and meta-regression analyses were performed. Thirty studies with 21,309 patients were included in this meta-analysis (1465 with COPD and 633 with asthma). Hospitalized COVID-19 patients with COPD had higher risk of death compared to those without COPD (OR: 2.29; 95% CI: 1.79–2.93; I2 59.6%). No significant difference in in-hospital mortality was seen in patients with and without asthma (OR: 0.87; 95% CI: 0.68–1.10; I2 0.0). The likelihood of death was significantly higher in patients with COPD that were hospitalized with COVID-19 compared to patients without COPD. Further studies are needed to assess whether this association is independent or not. No significant difference was demonstrated in COVID-19-related mortality between patients with and without asthma. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Pulmonology)
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Open AccessArticle
Patients’ Prioritization on Surgical Waiting Lists: A Decision Support System
by , , , and
Mathematics 2021, 9(10), 1097; https://doi.org/10.3390/math9101097 (registering DOI) - 13 May 2021
Abstract
Currently, in Chile, more than a quarter-million of patients are waiting for an elective surgical intervention. This is a worldwide reality, and it occurs as the demand for healthcare is vastly superior to the clinical resources in public systems. Moreover, this phenomenon has [...] Read more.
Currently, in Chile, more than a quarter-million of patients are waiting for an elective surgical intervention. This is a worldwide reality, and it occurs as the demand for healthcare is vastly superior to the clinical resources in public systems. Moreover, this phenomenon has worsened due to the COVID-19 sanitary crisis. In order to reduce the impact of this situation, patients in the waiting lists are ranked according to a priority. However, the existing prioritization strategies are not necessarily systematized, and they usually respond only to clinical criteria, excluding other dimensions such as the personal and social context of patients. In this paper, we present a decision-support system designed for the prioritization of surgical waiting lists based on biopsychosocial criteria. The proposed system features three methodological contributions; first, an ad-hoc medical record form that captures the biopsychosocial condition of the patients; second, a dynamic scoring scheme that recognizes that patients’ conditions evolve differently while waiting for the required elective surgery; and third, a methodology for prioritizing and selecting patients based on the corresponding dynamic scores and additional clinical criteria. The designed decision-support system was implemented in the otorhinolaryngology unit in the Hospital of Talca, Chile, in 2018. When compared to the previous prioritization methodology, the results obtained from the use of the system during 2018 and 2019 show that this new methodology outperforms the previous prioritization method quantitatively and qualitatively. As a matter of fact, the designed system allowed a decrease, from 2017 to 2019, in the average number of days in the waiting list from 462 to 282 days. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mathematical Modeling and Its Application in Medicine)
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Open AccessArticle
Long-COVID Syndrome? A Study on the Persistence of Neurological, Psychological and Physiological Symptoms
by , , , , , , , and
Healthcare 2021, 9(5), 575; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9050575 (registering DOI) - 13 May 2021
Abstract
Background: Emerging aspects of the Covid-19 clinical presentation are its long-term effects, which are characteristic of the so-called “long COVID”. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of physical, psychological, and sleep disturbances and the quality of life in [...] Read more.
Background: Emerging aspects of the Covid-19 clinical presentation are its long-term effects, which are characteristic of the so-called “long COVID”. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of physical, psychological, and sleep disturbances and the quality of life in the general population during the ongoing pandemic. Methods: This study, based on an online survey, collected demographic data, information related to COVID-19, sleep disturbances, and quality of life data from 507 individuals. The level of sleep disturbances and quality of life was assessed through the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) and the EuroQol-5D (EQ-5D), respectively. Results: In total, 507 individuals (M = 91 and F = 416 women) completed the online survey. The main symptoms associated with “long COVID” were headache, fatigue, muscle aches/myalgia, articular pains, cognitive impairment, loss of concentration, and loss of smell. Additionally, the subjects showed significant levels of insomnia (p < 0.05) and an overall reduced quality of life (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The results of the study appear in line with recent publications, but uncertainty regarding the definition and specific features of “long COVID” remains. Further studies are needed in order to better define the clinical presentation of the “long COVID” condition and related targeted treatments. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Application of Lifecycle Measures for an Integrated Method of Environmental Sustainability Assessment of Radio Frequency Identification and Wireless Sensor Networks
by , and
Energies 2021, 14(10), 2794; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14102794 (registering DOI) - 13 May 2021
Abstract
Internet of Things (IoT) technology has advanced in recent years, leading to improvements of manufacturing processes. As a result of such improvements, environmental sustainability assessments for technologies have been requested by international control agencies. Although various assessment approaches are widely applied, IoT technology [...] Read more.
Internet of Things (IoT) technology has advanced in recent years, leading to improvements of manufacturing processes. As a result of such improvements, environmental sustainability assessments for technologies have been requested by international control agencies. Although various assessment approaches are widely applied, IoT technology requires effective assessment methods to support the decision-making process and that incorporate qualitative measures to create quantifiable values. In this paper, a new environmental sustainability assessment method is developed to assess radio frequency identification (RFID) and wireless sensors networks (WSN). This integrated assessment method incorporates a modified and redesigned conceptual methodology based on technical project evaluation (IMATOV) and an extension of conventional lifecycle measures. The results shows the most and least important metrics. The most important metrics are the categories “electronic devices disposed of completely” and “decrease in stocks”, with the greatest GWFs (20% and 19%, respectively) and IAVs (127% and 117%, respectively) and moderate consolidated degrees of fulfillment. Relatively low degrees of fulfillment are achieved by categories such as “decrease in numbers of assets”, “supply chain echelons benefiting RFID”, and “tag lifecycle duration”, with IAVs below 10%. This study promotes an integrated method to support decision-making processes in the context of environmental sustainability assessments based on lifecycle measures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Measurement Applications in Industry 4.0)
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Open AccessArticle
Influence of Service Levels and COVID-19 on Water Supply Inequalities of Community-Managed Service Providers in Nepal
by , and
Water 2021, 13(10), 1349; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13101349 (registering DOI) - 13 May 2021
Abstract
In Nepal, there are three types of water service providers; two types of government-managed service providers covering urban and municipal areas, and community-managed service providers called Water Users and Sanitation Associations (WUSAs). This study aims to assess the current water supply service levels [...] Read more.
In Nepal, there are three types of water service providers; two types of government-managed service providers covering urban and municipal areas, and community-managed service providers called Water Users and Sanitation Associations (WUSAs). This study aims to assess the current water supply service levels and water supply inequalities of WUSAs in terms of water consumption, supply hours, and customer satisfaction. Among the three types of water service providers, WUSAs offered the best performance in terms of their low non-revenue water (NRW) rates and production costs, high bill collection rates, and long supply hours. During the COVID-19 lockdown, water consumption increased, but bill payment notably decreased, possibly due to restricted movement and hesitation by customers to make payments. The multiple-year water consumption variations illustrated the uneven water consumption behavior of customers. Despite the variation in water supply hours, Lorenz curves, Gini coefficients (G), and water consumption analysis depicted low inequalities (G ≈ 0.20–0.28) and adequate water consumption among WUSAs even in 2019–2020. In the three WUSAs, more than 90%, 74%, and 38% of customers consumed water above the basic, medium, and high levels, respectively. Thus, maintaining high service levels of WUSAs is instrumental in achieving Goal 6 of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in Nepal. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Pollution and Sanitation)
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Sequencing Techniques and Genomics Technologies to Help with Diagnostics and Virus Characterization – Focus on COVID 19
edited by Miten Jain, Hugh E. Olsen, and
submission deadline 15 Apr 2021 | 9 articles
(This special issue belongs to the Section Technologies and Resources for Genetics)
COVID-19 Public Policies Around the World: Lessons Learnt from a Series of Case Studies of the First Pandemic Wave
edited by and Sana de Courcelles
submission deadline 15 May 2021 | 18 articles
(This special issue belongs to the Section Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion)
Design for Older Adults: The COVID-19 Pandemic and Human-AI Interaction
edited by Sergio Sayago and Paula Forbes
submission deadline 15 May 2021
COVID-19 and Molecular Genetics
edited by and Michela Biancolella
submission deadline 20 May 2021 | 4 articles
(This special issue belongs to the Section Molecular Genetics and Genomics)
COVID-19 and Global Chronic Disease
edited by
submission deadline 21 May 2021 | 2 articles
(This special issue belongs to the Section Comorbidity)

State-of-the-Art Webinars on COVID-19


WEBINAR 1: How to Avoid a New Lockdown?

The first webinar in the series, held on 17 April 2020, saw both Prof. Dr. Antoine Flahault, Director of the Institute of Global Health, University of Geneva, Switzerland, and Prof. Dr. Evelyne Bischof, Associate Professor, Shanghai University of Medicine and Health Sciences, Shanghai, China and Research physician, University Hospital of Basel, Basel, Switzerland speak on this topic.

The recording can be found here.

WEBINAR 2: Coronaviruses: History, Replication, Innate Immune Antagonism

The second webinar in the series, entitled “Coronaviruses: history, replication, innate immune antagonism”, saw Prof. Dr. Susan R. Weiss, Professor of Microbiology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania speak on this topic.

The recording can be found here.

WEBINAR 3: Could the COVID-19 Crisis be the Opportunity to Make Cities Carbon Neutral, Liveable and Healthy

The third webinar in this series was presented by Prof. Dr. Mark Nieuwenhuijsen, a world leading expert in environmental exposure assessment, epidemiology, and health risk/impact assessment with a strong focus and interest on healthy urban living. 

The recording can be found here

WEBINAR 4: COVID-19 - Global Supply Chains and the SDGs

For the fourth webinar of this series, Prof. Dr. Max Bergman, Dr. Dorothea Schostok and Prof. Dr. Patrick Paul Walsh gave a presentation on Global Supply Chains and the SDGs. 

The recording can be found here.

WEBINAR 5: The New Role of Family Physicians in Times of COVID-19

The fifth webinar of the COVID-19 Series saw Prof. Dr. Christos Lionis discuss the new role of family physicians that emerged during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The recording can be found here.

WEBINAR 6: Survey on Symptoms/Signs, Protective Measures, Level of Awareness and Perception Regarding COVID-19 Outbreak among Dentists

In the sixth webinar of this series, Prof. Dr. Guglielmo Campus and Prof. Dr. Maria Grazia present and discuss the risk and the preventions that can and should be taken by dentists during this pandemic.

The recording can be found here.

WEBINAR 7: Living with COVID-19: An Early Intervention Therapeutic Strategy to Control the Pandemic

The seventh webinar of the COVID-19 series, Dr. Hamid Merchant discussed the different therapeutic strategies that can be adopted in the early stages of the infection.

The recording can be found here.

WEBINAR 8: Impact of COVID-19 on Routine Immunization, Reproduction and Pregnancy Outcome

For the eighth COVID-19 webinar, Prof. Dr. Jon Øyvind Odland will discuss the effect that COVID-19 seems to have on pregnant women; whereas Prof. Dr. Giovanni Gabutti will discuss the role of routine immunization as a way of fighting COVID-19.

Date and Time: 30 June 2020 at 3.00pm (CEST) | 9.00am (EDT) | 9.00pm (CST Asia)

Register now.

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