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J, Volume 3, Issue 4 (December 2020) – 3 articles

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Open AccessEditorial
Updated Strategy and Scope of the Multidisciplinary Scientific Journal J
J 2020, 3(4), 401-402; https://doi.org/10.3390/j3040030 - 13 Nov 2020
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Abstract
The journal J was launched at the beginning of 2018 [...] Full article
Open AccessArticle
Saint Peter’s First Burial Site According to Maria Valtorta’s Mystical Writings, Checked against the Archeology of Rome in the I Century
J 2020, 3(4), 366-400; https://doi.org/10.3390/j3040029 - 31 Oct 2020
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Abstract
The discovery of the mortal remains of the apostle Peter in the Vatican caves, in the 1940s, has aroused several doubts among scholars. In any case, there is consensus on this not being Peter’s first burial site on the Vatican Hill. The recent [...] Read more.
The discovery of the mortal remains of the apostle Peter in the Vatican caves, in the 1940s, has aroused several doubts among scholars. In any case, there is consensus on this not being Peter’s first burial site on the Vatican Hill. The recent studies on Maria Valtorta’s mystical writings have shown that they contain a lot of data open to check through disparate scientific disciplines. Every time this check has been done, unexpected results have been found, as if her writings contain data not ascribable to her skills and awareness. Maria Valtorta describes also Peter’s first burial site, which, she writes, was not on the Vatican Hill. The analysis of these particular texts, checked against the archeology of Rome in the I century and its catacombs, has allowed us to locate Peter’s first burial site in a hypogeum discovered in 1864 but not yet fully explored, near the beginning of Via Nomentana, in Rome. A mathematical estimate of the probability that Maria Valtorta, by chance, invented the data that lead to this particular site shows that it is very small and reinforces the conclusion, already reached with archeology, that casualness is very doubtful. The full exploration of this hypogeum would assess the reliability of this alleged Peter’s first burial site. Full article
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Microglial Expression of Hdac1 and Hdac2 is Dispensable for Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE) Progression
J 2020, 3(4), 358-365; https://doi.org/10.3390/j3040028 - 31 Oct 2020
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Abstract
Previously, we reported that microglial expression of histone deacetylases 1 and 2 (Hdac1 and Hdac2) is required for microglial maturation and modulates disease progression in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease. Here, we analyze the role of microglial expression of Hdac1 and Hdac2 [...] Read more.
Previously, we reported that microglial expression of histone deacetylases 1 and 2 (Hdac1 and Hdac2) is required for microglial maturation and modulates disease progression in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease. Here, we analyze the role of microglial expression of Hdac1 and Hdac2 in another disease paradigm, namely experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model for multiple sclerosis. The aim of this study was to ascertain whether microglial expression of these two epigenetic regulators modulates disease progression in the context of autoimmune disease. Hdac1 and Hdac2 were knocked out either individually or in combination using a microglia-specific, tamoxifen-inducible Cre-deleter line (Cx3cr1-CreERT2). The clinical course as well as histopathological changes during EAE were assessed in adult mice lacking microglial expression of these genes. Overall, no differences in disease onset, progression or severity could be detected in mice lacking microglial expression of either one or both of Hdac1 and Hdac2 genes. Similarly, the histopathology showed no differences in lymphocyte or macrophage infiltration or demyelination in either of the analyzed groups. As such, we conclude that unlike in neurodegenerative disease, microglial expression of Hdac1 and Hdac2 does not play a role in EAE. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Biology & Life Sciences)
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