Next Article in Journal
Selection of Machining Parameters Using a Correlative Study of Cutting Tool Wear in High-Speed Turning of AISI 1045 Steel
Next Article in Special Issue
Effect of Water-Based Nanolubricants in Ultrasonic Vibration Assisted Grinding
Previous Article in Journal / Special Issue
Support Structures for Additive Manufacturing: A Review
Open AccessArticle

A Computer-Aided Sustainable Modelling and Optimization Analysis of CNC Milling and Turning Processes

School of Science, Engineering and Information Technology, Federation University, Mt Helen Campus, Ballarat 3350, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Manuf. Mater. Process. 2018, 2(4), 65; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmmp2040065
Received: 20 August 2018 / Revised: 7 September 2018 / Accepted: 25 September 2018 / Published: 27 September 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Towards Sustainable Manufacturing Processes)
The sustainability of a manufacturing process can be measured by three main factors which impact both ecological and financial constraints. These factors are the energy required to achieve a specific job, the material utilized for the job, and the time taken to complete that job. These factors have to be quantified and analysed so that a proper manufacturing system can be designed to optimize process sustainability. For this purpose, a computer package, which utilizes life cycle inventory models has been presented for CNC (Computer Numerical Control) milling and turning processes. Based on utilization of resources and production stages, the job completion time for the turning and milling processes can be divided into process (i.e., machining), idle and basic times. As parameters are different for evaluating the process times, i.e., depth and width of cut in case of milling, initial and final diameters for turning, two different case studies are presented, one for each process. The effect of material selection on the sustainability factors has been studied for different processes. Our simulations show that highly dense and hard materials take more time in finishing the job due to low cutting speed and feed rates as compared to soft materials. In addition, face milling takes longer and consumes more power as compared to peripheral milling due to more retraction time caused by over travel distance and lower vertical transverse speeds than the horizontal transverse speed used in a peripheral retraction process. View Full-Text
Keywords: manufacturing sustainability; milling process; turning process; energy consumption; power consumption manufacturing sustainability; milling process; turning process; energy consumption; power consumption
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Singh, K.; Sultan, I.A. A Computer-Aided Sustainable Modelling and Optimization Analysis of CNC Milling and Turning Processes. J. Manuf. Mater. Process. 2018, 2, 65.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop