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Quantum Beam Sci., Volume 2, Issue 2 (June 2018)

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Cover Story (view full-size image) The ELIMAIA beamline is an experimental platform (laser beam transport and pulse treatment, ion [...] Read more.
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Open AccessEditorial Novel Quantum Beams from Integrated Laser-Driven Accelerator Systems
Quantum Beam Sci. 2018, 2(2), 14; https://doi.org/10.3390/qubs2020014
Received: 13 June 2018 / Accepted: 14 June 2018 / Published: 15 June 2018
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laser-driven Quantum Beams)
Open AccessReview Quantitative Scanning Laue Diffraction Microscopy: Application to the Study of 3D Printed Nickel-Based Superalloys
Quantum Beam Sci. 2018, 2(2), 13; https://doi.org/10.3390/qubs2020013
Received: 6 April 2018 / Revised: 18 May 2018 / Accepted: 4 June 2018 / Published: 5 June 2018
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Abstract
Progress in computing speed and algorithm efficiency together with advances in area detector and X-ray optics technologies have transformed the technique of synchrotron radiation-based scanning Laue X-ray microdiffraction. It has now evolved into a near real-time quantitative imaging tool for material structure and
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Progress in computing speed and algorithm efficiency together with advances in area detector and X-ray optics technologies have transformed the technique of synchrotron radiation-based scanning Laue X-ray microdiffraction. It has now evolved into a near real-time quantitative imaging tool for material structure and deformation at the micrometer and nanometer scales. We will review the achievements of this technique at the Advanced Light Source (Berkeley, CA, USA), and demonstrate its application in the thorough microstructural investigations of laser-assisted 3D printed nickel-based superalloys. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Strain, Stress and Texture Analysis with Quantum Beams)
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Open AccessArticle Texture Evolution in U-10Mo Nuclear Fuel Foils during Plasma Spray Coating with Zr
Quantum Beam Sci. 2018, 2(2), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/qubs2020012
Received: 21 April 2018 / Revised: 17 May 2018 / Accepted: 17 May 2018 / Published: 24 May 2018
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Abstract
A uranium-molybdenum alloy clad in 6061 aluminum has the potential to lead to a wide application of low-enriched uranium fuels, replacing highly enriched uranium for research reactors. A Zr coating acts as a diffusion barrier between the fuel and the aluminum cladding. In
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A uranium-molybdenum alloy clad in 6061 aluminum has the potential to lead to a wide application of low-enriched uranium fuels, replacing highly enriched uranium for research reactors. A Zr coating acts as a diffusion barrier between the fuel and the aluminum cladding. In this study, U-10Mo (mass %) was coated with Zr using a plasma spray technique recognized as a fast and economical coating method. Neutron time-of-flight diffraction was used to study the microstructure evolution by quantifying the phase fractions of involved phases as well as the texture evolution of U-10Mo and Zr during plasma spray coating with Zr. Quantitative texture analysis revealed that the texture was drastically changed for high coating temperatures, likely due to selective grain growth. Furthermore, the Zr coating showed a preferential orientation, which could be correlated with the initial texture of the uncoated U-10Mo. This could be explained by the epitaxial growth of the Zr on the U-10Mo substrate. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Strain, Stress and Texture Analysis with Quantum Beams)
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Open AccessArticle Strain-Induced Martensitic Transformation and Texture Evolution in Cold-Rolled Co–Cr Alloys
Quantum Beam Sci. 2018, 2(2), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/qubs2020011
Received: 31 March 2018 / Revised: 9 May 2018 / Accepted: 16 May 2018 / Published: 22 May 2018
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Abstract
Co–Cr alloys have been used in biomedical purposes such as stents and artificial hip joints. However, the difficulty of plastic deformation limits the application of the alloys. During the deformation, Co–Cr alloys often exhibit strain-induced martensitic transformation (SIMT), which is a possible reason
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Co–Cr alloys have been used in biomedical purposes such as stents and artificial hip joints. However, the difficulty of plastic deformation limits the application of the alloys. During the deformation, Co–Cr alloys often exhibit strain-induced martensitic transformation (SIMT), which is a possible reason for the low formability. The distinct increase in dislocation density in the matrix phase may also result in early fractures. Since these microstructural evolutions accompany the textural evolution, it is crucial to understand the relationship among the SIMT, the increase in dislocations, and the texture evolution. To characterize those at the same time, we conducted time-of-flight neutron diffraction experiments at iMATERIA beamline at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility (MLF), Ibaraki, Japan. The cold-rolled sheets of Co–29Cr–6Mo (CCM) and Co–20Cr–15W–10Ni (CCWN) alloys were investigated in this study. As expected from the different stacking fault energies, the SIMT progressed more rapidly in the CCM alloy. The dislocation densities of the matrix phases of the CCM and CCWN alloys increased similarly with an increase in the rolling reduction. These results suggest that the difference in deformability between the CCM and CCWN alloys originate not from the strain hardening of the matrix phase but from the growth behaviors of the martensitic phase. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Strain, Stress and Texture Analysis with Quantum Beams)
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Open AccessEditorial Materials and Life Science with Quantum Beams at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex
Quantum Beam Sci. 2018, 2(2), 10; https://doi.org/10.3390/qubs2020010
Received: 7 May 2018 / Revised: 14 May 2018 / Accepted: 14 May 2018 / Published: 14 May 2018
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Abstract
The Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility (MLF) is the major neutron and muon quantum beam facility in the eastern part of the world [...]
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(This article belongs to the collection Facilities)
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Open AccessReview Coherent, Short-Pulse X-ray Generation via Relativistic Flying Mirrors
Quantum Beam Sci. 2018, 2(2), 9; https://doi.org/10.3390/qubs2020009
Received: 28 February 2018 / Revised: 13 April 2018 / Accepted: 13 April 2018 / Published: 24 April 2018
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Abstract
Coherent, Short X-ray pulses are demanded in material science and biology for the study of micro-structures. Currently, large-sized free-electron lasers are used; however, the available beam lines are limited because of the large construction cost. Here we review a novel method to downsize
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Coherent, Short X-ray pulses are demanded in material science and biology for the study of micro-structures. Currently, large-sized free-electron lasers are used; however, the available beam lines are limited because of the large construction cost. Here we review a novel method to downsize the system as well as providing fully (spatially and temporally) coherent pulses. The method is based on the reflection of coherent laser light by a relativistically moving mirror (flying mirror). Due to the double Doppler effect, the reflected pulses are upshifted in frequency and compressed in time. Such mirrors are formed when an intense short laser pulse excites a strongly nonlinear plasma wave in tenuous plasma. Theory, proof-of-principle, experiments, and possible applications are addressed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laser-driven Quantum Beams)
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Open AccessReview ELIMAIA: A Laser-Driven Ion Accelerator for Multidisciplinary Applications
Quantum Beam Sci. 2018, 2(2), 8; https://doi.org/10.3390/qubs2020008
Received: 4 March 2018 / Revised: 22 March 2018 / Accepted: 23 March 2018 / Published: 2 April 2018
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Abstract
The main direction proposed by the community of experts in the field of laser-driven ion acceleration is to improve particle beam features (maximum energy, charge, emittance, divergence, monochromaticity, shot-to-shot stability) in order to demonstrate reliable and compact approaches to be used for multidisciplinary
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The main direction proposed by the community of experts in the field of laser-driven ion acceleration is to improve particle beam features (maximum energy, charge, emittance, divergence, monochromaticity, shot-to-shot stability) in order to demonstrate reliable and compact approaches to be used for multidisciplinary applications, thus, in principle, reducing the overall cost of a laser-based facility compared to a conventional accelerator one and, at the same time, demonstrating innovative and more effective sample irradiation geometries. The mission of the laser-driven ion target area at ELI-Beamlines (Extreme Light Infrastructure) in Dolní Břežany, Czech Republic, called ELI Multidisciplinary Applications of laser-Ion Acceleration (ELIMAIA) , is to provide stable, fully characterized and tuneable beams of particles accelerated by Petawatt-class lasers and to offer them to the user community for multidisciplinary applications. The ELIMAIA beamline has been designed and developed at the Institute of Physics of the Academy of Science of the Czech Republic (IoP-ASCR) in Prague and at the National Laboratories of Southern Italy of the National Institute for Nuclear Physics (LNS-INFN) in Catania (Italy). An international scientific network particularly interested in future applications of laser driven ions for hadrontherapy, ELI MEDical applications (ELIMED), has been established around the implementation of the ELIMAIA experimental system. The basic technology used for ELIMAIA research and development, along with envisioned parameters of such user beamline will be described and discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laser-driven Quantum Beams)
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