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Article

Associations between Activity Pacing, Fatigue, and Physical Activity in Adults with Multiple Sclerosis: A Cross Sectional Study

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Department of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Health and Allied Sciences, Ho PMB 31 Volta Region, Ghana
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School of Sport, Rehabilitation and Exercise Science, University of Essex, Colchester CO4 3SQ, Essex, UK
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Center for Human Movement Sciences, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, PO Box 72, 9700 AB Groningen, The Netherlands
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Department of Rehabilitation, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, PO Box 72, 9700 AB Groningen, The Netherlands
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Department of Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 8SB, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2020, 5(2), 43; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk5020043
Received: 13 April 2020 / Revised: 7 June 2020 / Accepted: 9 June 2020 / Published: 15 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exercise Evaluation and Prescription)
Fatigue is common in people with multiple sclerosis (MS). Activity pacing is a behavioral way to cope with fatigue and limited energy resources. However, little is known about how people with MS naturally pace activities to manage their fatigue and optimize daily activities. This study explored how activity pacing relates to fatigue and physical activity in people with MS. Participants were 80 individuals (60 females, 20 males) with a diagnosis of MS. The participants filled in questionnaires on their activity pacing, fatigue, physical activity, and health-related quality of life, 3–6 weeks before discharge from rehabilitation. The relationships between the variables were examined using hierarchical regression. After controlling for demographics, health-related quality of life, and perceived risk of overactivity, no associations were found between activity pacing and fatigue (β = 0.20; t = 1.43, p = 0.16) or between activity pacing and physical activity (β = −0.24; t = −1.61, p = 0.12). The lack of significant associations between activity pacing and fatigue or physical activity suggests that without interventions, there appears to be no clear strategy amongst people with MS to manage fatigue and improve physical activity. People with MS may benefit from interventions to manage fatigue and optimize engagement in physical activity. View Full-Text
Keywords: activity pacing; multiple sclerosis; perceived risk of overactivity; perceived fatigue; health-related quality of life; rehabilitation activity pacing; multiple sclerosis; perceived risk of overactivity; perceived fatigue; health-related quality of life; rehabilitation
MDPI and ACS Style

Abonie, U.S.; Hoekstra, F.; Seves, B.L.; Woude, L.H.V.v.d.; Dekker, R.; Hettinga, F.J. Associations between Activity Pacing, Fatigue, and Physical Activity in Adults with Multiple Sclerosis: A Cross Sectional Study. J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2020, 5, 43. https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk5020043

AMA Style

Abonie US, Hoekstra F, Seves BL, Woude LHVvd, Dekker R, Hettinga FJ. Associations between Activity Pacing, Fatigue, and Physical Activity in Adults with Multiple Sclerosis: A Cross Sectional Study. Journal of Functional Morphology and Kinesiology. 2020; 5(2):43. https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk5020043

Chicago/Turabian Style

Abonie, Ulric S., Femke Hoekstra, Bregje L. Seves, Lucas H.V.v.d. Woude, Rienk Dekker, and Florentina J. Hettinga 2020. "Associations between Activity Pacing, Fatigue, and Physical Activity in Adults with Multiple Sclerosis: A Cross Sectional Study" Journal of Functional Morphology and Kinesiology 5, no. 2: 43. https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk5020043

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