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Article

‘I’m Not Swedish Swedish’: Self-Appraised National and Ethnic Identification among Migrant-Descendants in Sweden

Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare, Malmö University, 211 19 Malmö, Sweden
Genealogy 2021, 5(2), 56; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy5020056
Received: 30 March 2021 / Revised: 28 May 2021 / Accepted: 1 June 2021 / Published: 7 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Genealogies of Racial and Ethnic Representation)
As a country of high migration, Sweden presents an interesting case for the study of belongingness. For the children of migrants, ethnic and national identification, as well as ascriptive identity, can pose challenges to feelings of belongingness, which is an essential element for positive mental health. In this article, survey data were collected from 626 Swedes whose parents were born in the following countries: Somalia, Poland, Vietnam, and Turkey. The results show that Poles significantly felt they received more reflective appraisals of ascription than any other group. However, despite not feeling as if they were being ascribed as Swedish, most group members (regardless of ethnic origin) had high feelings of belongingness to Sweden. Overall, individuals who felt that being Swedish was important for their identity indicated the highest feelings of belongingness. Further, individuals across groups showed a positive correlation between their national identification and ethnic identification, indicating a feeling of membership to both. These results mirror previous research in Sweden where individuals’ ethnic and national identities were positively correlated. The ability to inhabit multiple identities as a member of different groups is the choice of an individual within a pluralistic society. Multiple memberships between groups need not be contradictory but rather an expression of different spheres of inhabitance. View Full-Text
Keywords: belongingness; ethnic identity; Sweden; ascribed identity belongingness; ethnic identity; Sweden; ascribed identity
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MDPI and ACS Style

Adolfsson, C. ‘I’m Not Swedish Swedish’: Self-Appraised National and Ethnic Identification among Migrant-Descendants in Sweden. Genealogy 2021, 5, 56. https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy5020056

AMA Style

Adolfsson C. ‘I’m Not Swedish Swedish’: Self-Appraised National and Ethnic Identification among Migrant-Descendants in Sweden. Genealogy. 2021; 5(2):56. https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy5020056

Chicago/Turabian Style

Adolfsson, Caroline. 2021. "‘I’m Not Swedish Swedish’: Self-Appraised National and Ethnic Identification among Migrant-Descendants in Sweden" Genealogy 5, no. 2: 56. https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy5020056

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