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Article

Social Representations of Art in Public Places: A Study of Everyday Explanations of the Statue of ‘A Real Birmingham Family’

Centre for Health Services Studies, University of Kent, Canterbury CT2 7NF, UK
Genealogy 2021, 5(3), 59; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy5030059
Received: 5 May 2021 / Revised: 10 June 2021 / Accepted: 13 June 2021 / Published: 22 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Genealogies of Racial and Ethnic Representation)
This article focuses on the social/cultural representations of the statue of A Real Birmingham Family cast in bronze and unveiled in Britain’s second city in October 2014. It reveals a family comprising two local mixed-race sisters, both single mothers, and their sons, unanimously chosen from 372 families. Three of the four families shortlisted for the statue were ‘mixed-race’ families. The artwork came about through a partnership between the sculptress, Gillian Wearing, and the city’s Ikon Gallery. A number of different lay representations of the artwork have been identified, notably, that it is a ‘normal family with no fathers’ and that it is not a ‘typical family’. These are at variance with a representation based on an interpretation of the artwork and materials associated with its creation: that a nuclear family is one reality amongst many and that what constitutes a family should not be fixed. This representation destabilizes our notion of the family and redefines it as empirical, experiential, and first-hand, families being brought into recognition by those in the wider society who choose to nominate themselves as such. The work of Ian Hacking, Richard Jenkins, and others is drawn upon to contest the concept of ‘normality’. Further, statistical data are presented that show that there is now a plurality of family types with no one type dominating or meriting the title of ‘normal’. Finally, Wearing’s statues of families in Trentino and Copenhagen comprise an evolving body of cross-national public art that provides further context and meaning for this representation. View Full-Text
Keywords: social/cultural representations; Birmingham; Gillian Wearing; Ikon Gallery; mixed race; normality; family types social/cultural representations; Birmingham; Gillian Wearing; Ikon Gallery; mixed race; normality; family types
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MDPI and ACS Style

Aspinall, P.J. Social Representations of Art in Public Places: A Study of Everyday Explanations of the Statue of ‘A Real Birmingham Family’. Genealogy 2021, 5, 59. https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy5030059

AMA Style

Aspinall PJ. Social Representations of Art in Public Places: A Study of Everyday Explanations of the Statue of ‘A Real Birmingham Family’. Genealogy. 2021; 5(3):59. https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy5030059

Chicago/Turabian Style

Aspinall, Peter J. 2021. "Social Representations of Art in Public Places: A Study of Everyday Explanations of the Statue of ‘A Real Birmingham Family’" Genealogy 5, no. 3: 59. https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy5030059

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