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Article

Feeling Seen: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander LGBTIQ+ Peoples, (In)Visibility, and Social-Media Assemblages

Department of Indigenous Studies, Macquarie University, Sydney 2109, Australia
Genealogy 2021, 5(2), 57; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy5020057
Received: 15 April 2021 / Revised: 3 June 2021 / Accepted: 7 June 2021 / Published: 12 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Indigenous Identity and Community)
This article explores shifting social arrangements on social media as experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, intersex, and queer (LGBTIQ+) peoples. These digital social assemblages are situated within a broader context of heteropatriarchy and settler colonialism in Australia and beyond. In digital spaces, multiple marginalised groups encounter dialogic engagements with their friends, followers, networks, and broader publics. The exploration of how digital discourses (in)visibilise Indigenous LGBTIQ+ diversities underline the intimate and pervasive reach of settler colonialism, and highlight distinctly queer Indigenous strategies of resistance. Through the experience of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander LGBTIQ+ artists, activists, and celebrities, this article demonstrates the shifting unities and disunities that shape how we come to know and understand the complexities of Indigenous LGBTIQ+ identities and experiences. View Full-Text
Keywords: Aboriginal; Torres Strait Islander; gender; sexuality; LGBTIQ+; social media Aboriginal; Torres Strait Islander; gender; sexuality; LGBTIQ+; social media
MDPI and ACS Style

Farrell, A. Feeling Seen: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander LGBTIQ+ Peoples, (In)Visibility, and Social-Media Assemblages. Genealogy 2021, 5, 57. https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy5020057

AMA Style

Farrell A. Feeling Seen: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander LGBTIQ+ Peoples, (In)Visibility, and Social-Media Assemblages. Genealogy. 2021; 5(2):57. https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy5020057

Chicago/Turabian Style

Farrell, Andrew. 2021. "Feeling Seen: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander LGBTIQ+ Peoples, (In)Visibility, and Social-Media Assemblages" Genealogy 5, no. 2: 57. https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy5020057

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