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Open AccessFeature PaperReview

Successes and Challenges: Inhaled Treatment Approaches Using Magnetic Nanoparticles in Cystic Fibrosis

1
Department of Pharmacology & Therapeutics, Lung Health Research Centre, School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia
2
Department of Applied Physics, University of Granada, Av. Fuentenueva s/n, 18071 Granada, Spain
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Magnetochemistry 2020, 6(2), 25; https://doi.org/10.3390/magnetochemistry6020025
Received: 13 May 2020 / Revised: 28 May 2020 / Accepted: 2 June 2020 / Published: 4 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Magnetic Nanoparticles 2020)
Magnetic nanoparticles have been largely applied to increase the efficacy of antibiotics due to passive accumulation provided by enhancing permeability and retention, which is essential for the treatment of lung infections. Recurring lung infections such as in the life-shortening genetic disease cystic fibrosis (CF) are a major problem. The recent advent of the CF modulator drug ivacaftor, alone or in combination with lumacaftor or tezacaftor, has enabled systemic treatment of the majority of patients. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) show unique properties such as biocompatibility and biodegradability as well as magnetic and heat-medicated characteristics. These properties make them suitable to be used as drug carriers and hyperthermia-based agents. Hyperthermia is a promising approach for the thermal activation therapy of several diseases, including pulmonary diseases. The benefits of delivering CF drugs via inhalation using MNPs as drug carriers afford application of sufficient therapeutic dosages directly to the primary target site, while avoiding potential suboptimal pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics and minimizing the risks of systemic toxicity. This review explores the multidisciplinary approach of using MNPs as vehicles of drug delivery. Additionally, we highlight advantages such as increased drug concentration at disease site, minimized drug loss and the possibility of specific cell targeting, while addressing major challenges for this emerging field. View Full-Text
Keywords: cystic fibrosis; magnetic nanoparticles; ivacaftor; CFTR modulator; gene therapy; pulmonary; non-viral gene delivery cystic fibrosis; magnetic nanoparticles; ivacaftor; CFTR modulator; gene therapy; pulmonary; non-viral gene delivery
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MDPI and ACS Style

Tan, M.; Reyes-Ortega, F.; Schneider-Futschik, E.K. Successes and Challenges: Inhaled Treatment Approaches Using Magnetic Nanoparticles in Cystic Fibrosis. Magnetochemistry 2020, 6, 25.

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