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Open AccessCase Report

Dystocia in a Captive Reared Agouti (Dasyprocta leporina) in Trinidad and Tobago, West Indies

1
Department of Basic Veterinary Sciences (DBVS), School of Veterinary Medicine (SVM), Faculty of Medical Sciences, The University of the West Indies (UWI), Mt. Hope, Trinidad and Tobago
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The Open Tropical Forage-Animal Production Laboratory (OTF-APL), Department of Food Production (DFP), Faculty of Food and Agriculture (FFA), The University of the West Indies (UWI), St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Vet. Sci. 2020, 7(1), 30; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci7010030
Received: 30 December 2019 / Revised: 6 February 2020 / Accepted: 11 February 2020 / Published: 4 March 2020
Dystocia is a complication that occurs at parturition either due to foetal or maternal factors. This condition has been well studies in domesticated species. However, there is very little information on dystocia in the agouti (Dasyprocta leporina). The agouti is utilized for its meat in South America and the Caribbean. More recently, farming of these animals intensively is being practiced in the Neo-tropics. This case report attempted to provide some insight into dystocia in the agouti which has been rarely reported in animals in captivity. A female agouti weighing approximately 3 kg (kg), which was in the last stage of pregnancy, was found dead in its cage. The vulva of the animal had the hind-limbs of the offspring protruding. Upon necropsy the animal had little fat reserves and had two foetuses in the right horn of the uterus. The feet of on offspring were dislocated and exposed at the level of the vulva. Each foetus weighed approximately 200 g. The foetuses were well formed with fur, teeth and eyes. The placenta was attached to each of the foetuses. The pathological findings suggested that dystocia resulted in secondary uterine inertia, which was the cause of death of the adult female agouti. To prevent the recurrence of this situation the gestation should be staged (timed) using ultrasonography. Animals which are in their third stage of gestation should be monitored using cameras or with personnel at the facility to assist agoutis which are having difficulties at parturition. View Full-Text
Keywords: Neo-tropics; uterine inertia; Caribbean; South America; reproductive diseases; domestic livestock Neo-tropics; uterine inertia; Caribbean; South America; reproductive diseases; domestic livestock
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Jones, K.R.; Lall, K.R.; Garcia, G.W. Dystocia in a Captive Reared Agouti (Dasyprocta leporina) in Trinidad and Tobago, West Indies. Vet. Sci. 2020, 7, 30.

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